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Author Topic: Graffiti art  (Read 14040 times)
selectedgrub
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« on: November 24, 2013, 10:51:10 am »

New Zealand artist Owen Dippie.




« Last Edit: January 01, 2014, 12:09:48 pm by selectedgrub » Logged
Maets
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« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2013, 01:50:20 pm »

Nice art work.  Hopefully it will last a long while.

Nice website.
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selectedgrub
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« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2013, 02:35:53 am »

Yes, These will. Thanks.
He has started working on the Pietà piece again so will get some updates in a couple of weeks.
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Drew P
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« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2013, 06:18:39 am »

I saw that the other day-with a spray can? Really?

A may zing!
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« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2013, 12:28:59 pm »

I discovered one day a young fellow who used to work for me was a 'tagger', and it led to a conversation. He said that graffiti was an art form and that those who hold it back don't understand art, don't appreciate art, and don't understand the form. I said I agree, but Picasso, Monet and van Gogh didn't just sign their name and call it art. It matters not how detailed, how technical or how time-consuming the composition of your signature is, tagging is just a signature without the masterpiece to go with it.

This is art, and I doubt that few would argue that.
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Sorontar
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« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2013, 02:14:59 pm »

I discovered one day a young fellow who used to work for me was a 'tagger', and it led to a conversation. He said that graffiti was an art form and that those who hold it back don't understand art, don't appreciate art, and don't understand the form. I said I agree, but Picasso, Monet and van Gogh didn't just sign their name and call it art. It matters not how detailed, how technical or how time-consuming the composition of your signature is, tagging is just a signature without the masterpiece to go with it.

This is art, and I doubt that few would argue that.


If this is unsanctioned, it is graffiti due to it being vandalism. If it is sanctioned, it is a wall mural. That isn't to say that graffiti can't be a piece of art, but using the correct terms matters.

Have a look at the walls in Sheffield, Tasmania, Australia ( http://www.sheffieldmurals.com/). They are murals because they were sanctioned.

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« Last Edit: December 07, 2013, 02:16:34 pm by Sorontar » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2013, 03:45:30 pm »

I have loved graffiti art since I first saw it back in the mid '80s. It is an artform and there's many books on the subject.

Tagging is awful.
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« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2013, 04:56:31 pm »

Awesome work! Nice find.
Over here in the Netherlands, in Eindhoven, we have a big roundabout with a bicycle path going underneith. Inside the roundabout there are walls with a lot of graffiti. It is sanctioned but isn't a permanent exposition. It changes constantly with similair art as shown before.
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selectedgrub
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« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2013, 08:04:12 pm »

I have taken many photos of Graffiti. To me it is urban art.
Tagging is vandalism. Graffiti is an art, sanctioned or not.
Alot of these pieces will still be there in years to come. Some where not commissioned at all but remain.

Here's a few of the "better" ones.

















But wait.
There's more....
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selectedgrub
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« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2013, 08:10:06 pm »
















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selectedgrub
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« Reply #10 on: December 07, 2013, 08:15:24 pm »
















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« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2013, 08:15:14 am »

Yup, fantastic!
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SeVeNeVeS
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« Reply #12 on: December 08, 2013, 09:15:44 am »

I have always liked Graffiti art if it is art and not just tagging.

I think people like Banksy took it to another level tho.

I also like the idea of reverse graffiti.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/10/29/reverse-graffiti-activist_n_138621.html?

Although not graffiti I also love some the buildings done by John Pugh

~SeVeN~
« Last Edit: December 08, 2013, 09:28:45 am by SeVeNeVeS » Logged

Athanor
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« Reply #13 on: December 08, 2013, 07:57:03 pm »

Thanks for those images, selectedgrub. The contrast between these examples of "unsanctioned" art, and some of the "sanctioned" so-called "art" on view in public places, or hanging in high-class art galleries with price tags in the thousands of dollars, couldn't be greater. The best graffiti art is bold, vigorous - compelling, even - and carries cogent social criticism, whereas much that passes for "sanctioned" art nowadays seems (to me, at least) crude, uninteresting, and pretentious; often with the excuse that "art must reflect the spirit of the age," whatever that means.

Something to consider; "recognized" artists are publicly feted, wined and dined, well rewarded for their work, even get interviewed by Oprah and get their names in the news; graffiti artists are anonymous, unpaid, do their work surreptitiously, may even be punished for it, but they do it anyway for sheer love of the art, or because they feel somehow driven to do it. Who is showing the greater artistic integrity?

And really, who, with even the merest smidgen of an artistic temperament, when faced with the acres of street-level bare grey concrete that modern architects seem so fond of ("reflecting the spirit of the age" again, perhaps?), doesn't feel the urge to go to work on it with spray cans? In many cases, even the crudest tagging would be an improvement.

Athanor.

 



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« Reply #14 on: December 08, 2013, 11:03:56 pm »

I love graffiti art. I have picked upon the ethos behind it in my own art work, even though I dont paint murals on walls. Graffiti and Latrinalia. Latrinalia being toilet graffiti which has now been given art value in resemblance to cave drawings. And has been recorded since the 1920's according to this book I have on the subject.

 I did my final dissertation on Graffiti on my degree in uni. For it I interviewed a graffiti artist who used to it do illegally who now does it legally by selling and holding workshops for kids. In it I put Banksy to him since the "Fine Art" world has a distrust for him since he sells his work, saying that he is a sell out since graffiti is a more anarchaic form of art, accessable to all etc. Basically what this guy said was that there is no shame in selling something you love doing and he has respect for Banksy, love his work too. Of which I thoroughly believe in that. What I have a distrust for is modern art, an artist who takes an everyday object, places it, composes it in such a way in a gallery and calls it art. To me graffiti is one of those art forms including alt culture that is true modern art. I have respect for Banksy because his art, even when it is selling, is still cheap. Such a shame the fine art world doesnt pick upon this in many respects.

 Some good work on show there. I love seeing it. I dont think you can beat the brave vandals who spray it on sub way trains. I do not know if this a problem today but back in the 70s and 80s it was a major issue. But daring. Since society sees no problem in spamming our vision with bill boards, a graffiti artist has very much done the same when you can see it on the subway train when it emerges...especially on the overhead lines in New York.

 I have a great burning issue with local authorities and their so called utopian ideas in city architecture. They destroy graffiti and maintain these horrid concrete walls that are the biggest eye sore. Manchester is such a place in Piccadilly Gardens especially. Such blank canvases ought to be given imagery and colour, something for people to look at. Its part of experience....people dont want minimalism everywhere, but why we have that plain philistine crap...because economy deems that we can't live without it! This is where alternative cultures such as goth and steampunk come in...as well graffiti art and their subculture.
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selectedgrub
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« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2013, 09:25:48 pm »

Most is done in the dark, in haste and with a skill, precision and control that almost makes it look airbrushed..
The Princess Di one is 3 stories high.  Shocked
Although those were legal, I can only imagine the logistics to rig and ladder, have money for the spray cans.
For little or no recognition and to leave something, that to me, beautifies the stark look of a concrete jungle.
It made me bewildered to read (in the link SeVeN posted) the council trying to remove the reverse graffiti.


   
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selectedgrub
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« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2013, 09:36:55 pm »

Some more of my collection.













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selectedgrub
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« Reply #17 on: December 20, 2013, 09:43:14 pm »












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selectedgrub
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« Reply #18 on: December 25, 2013, 07:43:57 am »

More:
http://selectedgrub.blogspot.co.nz/2013/11/blog-post_4.html

Stunning.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2014, 05:59:09 am by selectedgrub » Logged
Fairley B. Strange
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« Reply #19 on: December 26, 2013, 09:11:27 pm »

I enjoy street-art not just for it's technical execution, but also because of it's humour and whimsy coupled with seeing normal situations with a new slant, for example:

http://memolition.com/2013/02/02/the-best-examples-of-street-art-in-2012-48-pictures/
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selectedgrub
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« Reply #20 on: January 02, 2014, 06:12:24 am »

Thanks!!.
Really enjoyed that. Some simple but effective pieces.

Here's another. Vermeer



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Maets
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« Reply #21 on: January 02, 2014, 02:09:11 pm »

Nice find Fairley.

Continued nice selection Select.
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selectedgrub
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« Reply #22 on: January 04, 2014, 08:11:04 am »

Cheers.

Here's a series of small pieces.
These are about 1.5mtr squared.









This one made me think.
I thought maybe the artist couldn't count,
Then it just could be the awkwardness of shaking someones hand that had 5 fingers.
Or maybe "Take me to your leader Earth scum"



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Fairley B. Strange
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« Reply #23 on: January 04, 2014, 10:49:53 am »

]



This one made me think.
I thought maybe the artist couldn't count,
Then it just could be the awkwardness of shaking someones hand that had 5 fingers.
Or maybe "Take me to your leader Earth scum"





*insert cross-Tasman joke about newzealanders...*   Cheesy
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selectedgrub
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« Reply #24 on: January 05, 2014, 08:34:17 pm »

Yes, it makes us able to hold a rugby ball better.
But that's not why we beat you all the time.
 Tongue
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