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Author Topic: Airships: They don't make them like they used to  (Read 2128 times)
Atterton
Time Traveler
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Only The Shadow knows


« Reply #25 on: February 25, 2016, 10:48:07 pm »

The New Yorker has an article on the potential of cargo airships:

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/02/29/a-new-generation-of-airships-is-born
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #26 on: February 26, 2016, 02:00:40 am »



JLockheed Martin are advertising  an airship for passenger and cargo transport.

http://youtu.be/JO76dkzV28k
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #27 on: February 26, 2016, 03:25:39 am »

The curious thing is that up until 2005 (and probably until present day) there is zero discussion on practical engineering science relevant to airships at American universities. Certainly as an ASE major, I never saw any undergraduate or graduate courses on the subject. This includes aircraft design courses touching on sizing (preliminary design) of lighter than air vehicles.

I see that based on the success rate of recent attempts, designing and building an airship is a bit more challenging than professionals guess. Victims of engineering hubris, perhaps? Isn't it time that some discussions take place between industry and faculty at universities?
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #28 on: February 26, 2016, 03:40:57 am »

Nice article (the New Yorker).  Thanks for posting.
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #29 on: February 26, 2016, 04:46:48 am »

The curious thing is that up until 2005 (and probably until present day) there is zero discussion on practical engineering science relevant to airships at American universities. Certainly as an ASE major, I never saw any undergraduate or graduate courses on the subject. This includes aircraft design courses touching on sizing (preliminary design) of lighter than air vehicles.

I see that based on the success rate of recent attempts, designing and building an airship is a bit more challenging than professionals guess. Victims of engineering hubris, perhaps? Isn't it time that some discussions take place between industry and faculty at universities?

While I am by no means an expert or knowledgeable on the subject , it does appear that most of the research and use of  airships in various forms, are military . There has not been a craft that has demonstrated enough viability for there to be an industrial interest in  funding  research. It has relied on those with a fascination or fixation on zeppelin and dirigible to keep the flames fanned on research and development ; which puts  the subject in the realm of eccentricity.

The secrecy that often surrounds military and industrial development along with a perception of being a crack pot  idea without apparent validity, may have kept the subject out of the public sphere

If there is anything New Zealand likes more than the development  of eccentric  or avant-garde flight craft  - it is a  top secret governmental / military conspiracy .
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Captain
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« Reply #30 on: February 26, 2016, 05:17:04 am »

You all might like this SP airship site too:  http://www.thesteampunkempire.com/group/naca 
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-Karl
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #31 on: February 26, 2016, 05:28:53 am »

You all might like this SP airship site too:  http://www.thesteampunkempire.com/group/naca 


 Sky Pirates ! That has a subversive ring to it. It might be worth looking into.
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #32 on: February 26, 2016, 05:54:10 am »



 Here is an intriguing article regarding UFO sightings in New Zealand  from pre WW1 that may be reference to early  military  experiments in aviation  warfare. There were other sightings of a similar nature in the mid - late 1890s.


http://www.ufocusnz.org.nz/content/THE-NEW-ZEALAND-UFO-WAVE-OF-1909/53.aspx
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #33 on: February 26, 2016, 08:12:51 am »

The curious thing is that up until 2005 (and probably until present day) there is zero discussion on practical engineering science relevant to airships at American universities. Certainly as an ASE major, I never saw any undergraduate or graduate courses on the subject. This includes aircraft design courses touching on sizing (preliminary design) of lighter than air vehicles.

I see that based on the success rate of recent attempts, designing and building an airship is a bit more challenging than professionals guess. Victims of engineering hubris, perhaps? Isn't it time that some discussions take place between industry and faculty at universities?


While I am by no means an expert or knowledgeable on the subject , it does appear that most of the research and use of  airships in various forms, are military . There has not been a craft that has demonstrated enough viability for there to be an industrial interest in  funding  research. It has relied on those with a fascination or fixation on zeppelin and dirigible to keep the flames fanned on research and development ; which puts  the subject in the realm of eccentricity.

The secrecy that often surrounds military and industrial development along with a perception of being a crack pot  idea without apparent validity, may have kept the subject out of the public sphere

If there is anything New Zealand likes more than the development  of eccentric  or avant-garde flight craft  - it is a  top secret governmental / military conspiracy .


But that doesn't stop universities from being involved in military projects. Quite the contrary.  Take my own research when I first graduated and entered graduate school: hyper-velocity cannon projectiles fitted with cameras and automated control processors at the tip.  The project was wholly non-commercial.  Funded by the Army and the Air Force. Our particular contract came from the Air Force.

Secret? Classified you say? Ney!! Not all military research is classified. Not all military research is secret. A lot of it is open to international students. Myself as an American undergrad, an Italian post-doctorate fellow and an American post doctorate girl were all working in this project. This was openly non-classified technology discussed - in the open - at meetings sponsored by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) - and the subject of student presentation competitions (!), and I should know, because I won the AIAA Southwest Regional Student Conference held at NASA, Houston in 1997, precisely with that research. Totally open to the public.

http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/abs/10.2514/6.1998-7

You're right, the money is not commercial - but the government is VERY good at spending money  Grin
« Last Edit: February 26, 2016, 08:14:37 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
keithjones
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« Reply #34 on: March 03, 2016, 02:49:20 am »

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