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Author Topic: What is the name of the “Thing” that holds Gears in place in a Gearing mechanism  (Read 1882 times)
Gingerwerewolf
Deck Hand
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


Rufus Der Eisenhans


« on: September 17, 2013, 11:47:19 am »

Hello there Gents!

I’ve got a weird question that you may know the answer to:

What is the name of the “Thing” that holds Gears in place in a Gearing mechanism - Watches obviously!

IE inside a time peice, there are usually several sheets of Metal cut to shape and with holes in them that the Gears and their axels are mounted upon.

Do those sheets, and the way that they are cut, have a name?

Thanks!
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Argus Fairbrass
Rogue Ætherlord
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England England


So English even the English don't get it!


« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2013, 02:41:13 pm »

If you're referring to the things that hold the little pillars and bars, the only terms I'm familiar with are plates and bridges. Someone else may know of some others.
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Abslomrob
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Canada Canada



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« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2013, 03:52:17 pm »

On most vintage watches, the wheels (which contain the leaves and teeth) are on pinions (that's the long metal post).  The pinions are held by pierced jewels or bushings which sit in the plates.  The dial-side is normally referred to as the "Pillar plate", while the back has either plates, bridges or cocks.  Old American watches are often "Full Plate" or "3/4 plate" designs (meaning that the back contains a "plate" that holds most of the pinions).  Higher quality swiss watches of that era often used "Finger bridges" or cocks.  The difference is that a bridge is attached to the pillar plate on both sides of the pivots, while a cock is only attached on one side.  The balance wheel is nearly always held by a cock.  Most modern swiss wristwatches have a "barrel bridge", a "train bridge" and sometimes a separate escape wheel cock.
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Gingerwerewolf
Deck Hand
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


Rufus Der Eisenhans


« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2013, 08:41:15 pm »

That is fantastic thank you both! Exactly what I wanted to know Cheesy
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