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Author Topic: Putting a small gear on a large shaft  (Read 2041 times)
Jake of All Trades
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« on: March 07, 2007, 03:52:19 am »

Are they any tips or tricks to be known for increasing the diameter of the shaft opening on a plastic or metal gear, wheel, pulley, etc?  I don't need incredible precision, but better than one would get by "just drilling it".  I've tried the latter many times before, and have always had, er, "wobbly" results...
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Tel Janin
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« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2007, 04:53:09 am »

Got a lathe  handy? Should be able to get pretty precise and unwobbly results that way.
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Jake of All Trades
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« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2007, 04:54:08 am »

I wish! Grin
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egdinger
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« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2007, 05:27:28 am »

Do you have a drill press? If so I clamp the whatever in a vice and use a rod or drillbit the exact size of the hole to center everything then change to the bit you want to and drill, if it's not to big a jump in size. Seems like that should work, unforantly I havn't tried this method because I don't have a drill press near by when ever I need one.
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cartertools
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« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2007, 06:14:16 am »

Do you have a drill press? If so I clamp the whatever in a vice and use a rod or drillbit the exact size of the hole to center everything then change to the bit you want to and drill, if it's not to big a jump in size...

Easier would be to use a rod with a pointy end (say a 60 degree point) in the drill press and use it to center the gear.
This would get it pretty close. You could file the point on the rod while it is held in the drill chuck, just be careful, etc.
If you have a 60 degree combined centerdrill or spotting drill you could also just use that, or one of the pointy type combo edgefinders.

If you can find a copy of "Precision Hole Location", there are a lot of good methods...

Ultimately though, a lathe as other have suggested would be the perfect solution.



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BlueFly
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« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2007, 02:09:36 pm »


Easier would be to use a rod with a pointy end (say a 60 degree point) in the drill press and use it to center the gear.
This would get it pretty close. You could file the point on the rod while it is held in the drill chuck, just be careful, etc.

If you're willin' to pay for shipping, I could turn you a center finder on my lathe.  I've got plenty of scrap laying around, so it wouldn't cost a thing to make.  Just let me know how large a diameter you need it for.
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CapnHarlock
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« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2007, 03:25:57 am »

I know nothing about the company in the following link , I was simply looking for a picture and description of what may well be my next big tool purchase  - fairly low cost, but high-function  - a drill-press attachment for a hand-held rotary tool - this may be a good short-term solution for the drilling dilemma

http://www.hmcelectronics.com/cgi-bin/scripts/query.cgi?query=220-01
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