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Author Topic: Painting oxidation?  (Read 1893 times)
Alva Maria
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« on: May 21, 2013, 09:48:28 pm »

I need a bit of help with a piece I'm doing, and while I have a strong background in art, painting isn't exactly my forte-- propmaking even less so. Does anyone have any tips or tricks to turning faux copper into faux blue green oxidation realistically? I need some help pretty quickly, my first show case with this thing is on Thursday
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Narsil
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« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2013, 10:35:41 pm »

Copper oxidation is basically a palette of blue, green and turquoise, it's texture will tend to be fairly matte, although heavier deposits will tend to become increasingly granular and may exhibit crystalline spots and additional colours.

Surface layers can be applied by stippling (with a brush or sponge) alternate mottle layers of blue and green paint, ideally a fairly intense, mid-tone like cobalt blue and chrome green. A light spray of water can help give  a more natural texture, just enough to blend the colours slightly but not enough to make it run.

Lighten the final layers by mixing white paint with the colours to give a slightly chalky effect to the highlights.

More developed corrosion tends to have a bit more texture  this can be achieved by adding a thickening medium to the paint and/or something like sand , crushed marble, coral sand etc  to give a more granular texture.

Where more texture is used dry brushing and ink washes can be used to increase the depth and tonal range of the effect.

If you're working with oil paints the encaustic can be a very good way of simulating corrosion but this isn't that durable for props which need to be frequently handled.

As with all effects you'll get the best results by taking some time to study the real thing. Real copper oxides can vary considerably from blue to green and may include yellow tints and may be either a filary flat colour or distinctly mottled.

For a quick result dry brushing with turquoise paint mixed with white can be very effective.
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Alva Maria
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« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2013, 12:25:03 am »

Thank you! I did go out and get what you recommended, in way of colors, and I'll try and post results later
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Steam Titan
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fulgur adducere


« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2013, 01:21:09 am »

yeah on smaller scale minatures in the past I've dappled teal and the like allover the aress where the oxidation would happen most
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SpaceClown
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« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2013, 09:25:11 pm »

A bit late to the party, but this is a quick and easy approach with good results. 



SC
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