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Author Topic: ~ {{ The Fried Foods from Around the World thread }} ~  (Read 15420 times)
bicyclebuilder
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« Reply #25 on: May 20, 2013, 02:40:59 pm »

French Toast / Eggy Bread, Payn Perdue and Torrejas

French Toast may not me deep fried and is fried in a pan, but it's still fried!
#SNIP#

When I was single, I used to make them a lot. Half a loaf of bread was to little, one loaf to much. By the time the bread was getting harder, I made frensh toast for dinner.
Now, our daughter and I usually feed old bread to the ducks in the pond.
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« Reply #26 on: May 20, 2013, 07:20:19 pm »

As far as French Toast goes, I have a couple of hints. The first is that dark rum is an excellent addition to the batter. The second is that many things besides ordinary bread may be used. A day-old baguette sliced diagonally works well. Some places use various sweet breads or pastries, in place of bread, including an insidious cinnamon-roll version that a place in Arcata, California does all too well. Also, you can throw a not-too-thick slice of battered bread into a hot waffle iron.
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« Reply #27 on: May 20, 2013, 07:56:05 pm »

As far as French Toast goes, I have a couple of hints. The first is that dark rum is an excellent addition to the batter. The second is that many things besides ordinary bread may be used. A day-old baguette sliced diagonally works well. Some places use various sweet breads or pastries, in place of bread, including an insidious cinnamon-roll version that a place in Arcata, California does all too well. Also, you can throw a not-too-thick slice of battered bread into a hot waffle iron.

I think the first large picture I posted in the previous page shows the baguette version of French Toast.  But I'm not entirely surprised that olive oil is used in Spain version of the same ("Torrejas", although I would not be a fan of using olive oil in that application.
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« Reply #28 on: May 21, 2013, 07:34:58 am »

Chopitos Fritos (Fried Cuttlefish) and Calamares (Calamari) - Spain

Self explanatory, these are a type of tapas or bar food dishes from Spain



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lientie
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« Reply #29 on: May 31, 2013, 12:18:24 am »

I'm hungry now, all this food looks amazing..

One I tried after seeing it on Saturday morning kitchen is bananas deep fried in tempura batter, with some good Cornish ice cream and homemade butterscotch sauce (which it turns out it's basically liquid fudge?). So good..also it's bananas so definitely healthy. Yep.
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« Reply #30 on: May 31, 2013, 06:06:27 pm »

Although Juneau definitely fries a few foods like fry bread and beer battered halibut, we cannot compare to when I lived in North Carolina.

  Fired dill pickles which I still crave once in a while. 

Fried Hushpuppies are still one of my wife's comfort foods. 

Fried Twinkies (or whatever the current substitute for Twinkies is)

Fried pies.

And the ever safe fried turkey.   Wink
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« Reply #31 on: May 31, 2013, 07:01:09 pm »

Nobody has mentioned onion rings yet?

Yum!
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« Reply #32 on: May 31, 2013, 11:09:58 pm »

Although Juneau definitely fries a few foods like fry bread and beer battered halibut, we cannot compare to when I lived in North Carolina.

  Fired dill pickles which I still crave once in a while. 

Fried Hushpuppies are still one of my wife's comfort foods. 

Fried Twinkies (or whatever the current substitute for Twinkies is)

Fried pies.

And the ever safe fried turkey.   Wink



Are those pies covered in..icing sugar? That would be too much for me o.O (especially if they're savory pies..)
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« Reply #33 on: May 31, 2013, 11:34:55 pm »

I used to eat deep fried pies, you can get them from any decent(?) chippy. Also battered burgers (battered battenburg burgers!) and deep fried pizza.
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« Reply #34 on: June 01, 2013, 04:55:39 am »

Fried Twinkies (or whatever the current substitute for Twinkies is)


Fried Little Debbie Swiss Cake Rolls?
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« Reply #35 on: June 01, 2013, 09:24:10 am »

*snip*

Fried pies.

*snip*



Are those pies covered in..icing sugar? That would be too much for me o.O (especially if they're savory pies..)


These are generally fruit pies: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fried_pie
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« Reply #36 on: June 01, 2013, 10:08:51 am »

I may be pushing it, but perhaps not all of the dish needs to be fried or deep fried....

Chalupas and Tostadas:

The name Chalupa ("chaw-loo-pah") is Nahuatl (Aztec) for canoe, and the name Tostada ("toh-stah-dah") is Spanish for "toasted"

In the case of the chalupa, a maize dough ("masa") is formed into a shallow "canoe" like dish and fried in lard. In the case of the tostada, a day-old maize tortilla is fried to salvage the bread.  Both of these are mounted with various foods; a tostada typically is filled with beans, cheese, sour cream, chopped lettuce, sliced onions, which is then topped with diced and fried meat, usually chicken or pork.

Shrimp Tostada
(Image, Sergio Andrade, 2007, creative commons 2.0)


A Chalupa
(Image in public domain)
« Last Edit: June 01, 2013, 10:17:57 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #37 on: June 03, 2013, 05:32:25 pm »

*snip*

Fried pies.

*snip*



Are those pies covered in..icing sugar? That would be too much for me o.O (especially if they're savory pies..)


These are generally fruit pies: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fried_pie


North Carolina fried pies are usually sweet.  Very sweet.  http://www.bgpies.com/

I cannot believe that I forgot the Kult of Krispy Kreme: 



Krispy Kreme donuts are fried and have a near religious status in North Carolina.  When the "bug light" goes on at a local shop people swarm to the store like insects.





This is one fried food I am very able to resist. 
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« Reply #38 on: June 03, 2013, 06:06:16 pm »

That is insane. A doughnut burger: instant heart attack - also a novelty or fad that cannot be considered "typical" or "folkloric" fare in the US - the doughnut stands alone much better.

~~~

My Australian roommate is on a quest for "mythical American Fast Food" as he tries to find and gobble down all manner of stereotypically American fast food, much to my chagrin and vituperation (he had to confirm for himself and would not accept my word that there is no such thing as a "Mexican Hat bowl"- a giant "Tex-Mex" fried tortilla bowl in the size and shape of a real hat *facepalm* - what did he watch on TV as a child??)

I think rather than sending him down the ridiculous path of fried cola, I should point out more traditional carnival/fair food such as the Corn Dog

As Americans prefer yellow maize for their cornmeal and corn bread, the Corn Dog is a sausage mounted on a wooden stick, wrapped in cornbread batter and then deep fried.  The trick of this food being, of course, that the use of yellow corn (maize) combines a certain sweetness with the savoury taste of the sausage.  Usually I tend to like the flavour combo, depending on the quality of the sausage:



Cross-section:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

« Last Edit: June 03, 2013, 06:57:32 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
RJBowman
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« Reply #39 on: June 03, 2013, 06:56:17 pm »

Fried cola is a real thing; it's batter, made with cola, poured into a frier. I haven't had it, but it looks like it would taste like a cola-flavored funnel cake.

There are factory-produced corn dogs that are fried and frozen, to be heated before serving, but they are inferior to freshly made.

Some corn dog stands also sell cheddar cheese fried in batter on a stick. I tried it, but didn't care much for it.
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« Reply #40 on: June 03, 2013, 06:59:57 pm »

I found the sausage itself makes a big difference in the taste as well.  Usually I reheat frozen ones in a toaster oven, so the outside is semi-decent.  This is like "movie pop-corn;" the venue affects the taste as well!  It's not the same unless you are at a fair..

Texas State Fair 2008
(Image by Andreas Praefcke; Creative Commons 3.0 license)
« Last Edit: June 03, 2013, 07:11:02 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Mr. Boltneck
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« Reply #41 on: June 03, 2013, 11:30:24 pm »

Here's an Instructable for deep-fryed S'mores: http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-Fried-Smores-Recipe/
N.B. I have not tested this recipe, nor do I have any plans to do so, so I cannot vouch for it, although it looks... plausible.
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« Reply #42 on: June 04, 2013, 12:20:33 am »

Fried cola is a real thing; it's batter, made with cola, poured into a frier. I haven't had it, but it looks like it would taste like a cola-flavored funnel cake.

There are factory-produced corn dogs that are fried and frozen, to be heated before serving, but they are inferior to freshly made.

Some corn dog stands also sell cheddar cheese fried in batter on a stick. I tried it, but didn't care much for it.


So if fried cola is a variation on fried choux pastry, then I must include the concept:

Funnel Cake / Strauben and other Choux Pastry

Quote
Funnel cake or funny cake is a regional food popular in North America at carnivals, fairs, sporting events, and seaside resorts.

Funnel cakes are made by pouring batter into hot cooking oil in a circular pattern and deep frying the overlapping mass until golden-brown. When made at concession stands, a pitcher with an integral funnel spout is employed.

Funnel cakes are typically served plain with powdered sugar, or with jam, cinnamon, Nutella, fresh fruit, or other toppings. In the book I'm Just Here for the Food, Alton Brown recommends they be baked with choux pastry, which expands from steam produced by its high water content.

In North America, funnel cakes were originally associated with the Pennsylvania Dutch region.

In Austrian cuisine the equivalent is called Strauben and is made and served similarly.


~~~

Choux pastry, or pâte à choux (pronounced: [pɑt a ʃu]), is a light pastry dough used to make profiteroles, croquembouches, éclairs, French crullers, beignets, St. Honoré cake, Indonesian kue sus, and gougères. It contains only butter, water, flour, and eggs. Like Yorkshire Pudding or David Eyre's pancake, instead of a raising agent it employs high moisture content to create steam during cooking to puff the pastry.

Choux pastry is usually baked but for beignets it is fried. In Spain and Latin America, churros are made of fried choux pastry, sugared and dipped in a thin chocolate blancmange for breakfast. In Austrian cuisine, it is also boiled to make Marillenknödel, a sweet apricot dumpling; in that case it does not puff, but remains relatively dense. They are sometimes filled with cream and used to make cream puffs or éclairs.[1]



Funnel Cake (with no toppings) in Coney Island
(Image 2012 (cc) David Sandbrand, Creative commons license 3.0)


A Pair of Choux Pastry Swans
(Image 2008 (cc) Foodista, Creative commons license 2.0)

« Last Edit: June 04, 2013, 12:25:55 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #43 on: June 04, 2013, 01:08:59 am »

That is insane. A doughnut burger: instant heart attack - also a novelty or fad that cannot be considered "typical" or "folkloric" fare in the US - the doughnut stands alone much better.

~~~

My Australian roommate is on a quest for "mythical American Fast Food" as he tries to find and gobble down all manner of stereotypically American fast food, much to my chagrin and vituperation (he had to confirm for himself and would not accept my word that there is no such thing as a "Mexican Hat bowl"- a giant "Tex-Mex" fried tortilla bowl in the size and shape of a real hat *facepalm* - what did he watch on TV as a child??)

I think rather than sending him down the ridiculous path of fried cola, I should point out more traditional carnival/fair food such as the Corn Dog

As Americans prefer yellow maize for their cornmeal and corn bread, the Corn Dog is a sausage mounted on a wooden stick, wrapped in cornbread batter and then deep fried.  The trick of this food being, of course, that the use of yellow corn (maize) combines a certain sweetness with the savoury taste of the sausage.  Usually I tend to like the flavour combo, depending on the quality of the sausage:



Cross-section:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)



I am afraid that the Krispy Kreme doughnut burger is not as rare as it should be in North Carolina.  Wink

Traveling through South Dakota I found fry bread burgers while locally we have "Indian Taco" sales. 



Please suggest that your Australian roommate try this Burgerzilla if he gets to Anchorage:  http://www.supersizedmeals.com/food/article.php/20080925-Burgerzilla_Anchorage_Alaska 

I have heard several guys mention "deep fried bacon" but I do not believe that anyone is making it here.  Yet.  There seems to be a spreading bacon fetish. 

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« Reply #44 on: June 04, 2013, 04:48:40 am »

Is the bacon cooked or raw when it's dipped in batter?
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« Reply #45 on: June 04, 2013, 05:18:24 am »

Is the bacon cooked or raw when it's dipped in batter?

Generally raw; there is one recipe which calls for previously fried (streaky) bacon strips to be battered and baked!


Chicken Fried Bacon

Definitely a relatively new concoction (not traditional), and invented in Texas, as it reads in Wikipedia:

Quote
Chicken-fried bacon consists of bacon strips dredged in batter and deep fried, like chicken fried steak. It is an American dish that was introduced in Texas in the early 1990s.[1] Frank Sodolak of Sodolak's Original Country Inn in Snook, Texas, claims to have invented the dish; however, a similar recipe in the Louisiana Cookery cookbook by Mary Land uses salt pork, the bacon of its day. It is usually served as an appetizer with cream gravy or sausage gravy for dipping and sauce


Chicken-Fried Bacon
(Image 2002 by cara fealy choate  Creative Commons 2.0)


Ha, ha!  This video is like a really bad collection of stereotypes all coming true in front of your face  Cheesy  Or maybe pre-historical man still extant on Earth...  You will notice not a single person in this little town is thin!!  But since I live in Texas I'll have to travel and see if such primitive cultures do in fact still exist in the hill country  Grin

Chicken Fried Bacon (Texas Country Reporter)
« Last Edit: June 04, 2013, 07:46:45 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #46 on: June 04, 2013, 06:47:38 am »


Ha, ha!  This video is like a really bad collection of stereotypes all coming true in front of your face  Cheesy  Or maybe pre-historical man still extant on Earth...  You will notice not a single person in this little town is thin!!  But since I live in Texas I'll have to travel and see if such primitive cultures do in fact still exist in the hill country  Grin

Chicken Fried Bacon (Texas Country Reporter)


By all the gods, that bacon looks and sounds delicious!
But did that lady put a bunch of ketchup on her steak near the end??
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« Reply #47 on: June 04, 2013, 07:26:38 am »


Ha, ha!  This video is like a really bad collection of stereotypes all coming true in front of your face  Cheesy  Or maybe pre-historical man still extant on Earth...  You will notice not a single person in this little town is thin!!  But since I live in Texas I'll have to travel and see if such primitive cultures do in fact still exist in the hill country  Grin

Chicken Fried Bacon (Texas Country Reporter)


By all the gods, that bacon looks and sounds delicious!
But did that lady put a bunch of ketchup on her steak near the end??


Horrifying isn't it?  I suspect this is a little village of mutants.  No self-respecting Texan would do that to a good steak.  Have you seen the size of those steaks?  I don't care if I have to drive 8 hours (yes, Texas is that big), I might try to visit the town - just to get at some of those steaks - and try the chicken fried bacon.  Properly armed, of course.
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« Reply #48 on: June 04, 2013, 01:00:00 pm »

I'm a veggie, so I must say much of this is alien to me! But I love falafel and spring rolls and samosas and bhajis and pakora.

Really hungry now damn it =P
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« Reply #49 on: June 04, 2013, 04:50:40 pm »

Fried cola is a real thing; it's batter, made with cola, poured into a frier. I haven't had it, but it looks like it would taste like a cola-flavored funnel cake.

There are factory-produced corn dogs that are fried and frozen, to be heated before serving, but they are inferior to freshly made.

Some corn dog stands also sell cheddar cheese fried in batter on a stick. I tried it, but didn't care much for it.


So if fried cola is a variation on fried choux pastry, then I must include the concept:

Funnel Cake / Strauben and other Choux Pastry

Quote
Funnel cake or funny cake is a regional food popular in North America at carnivals, fairs, sporting events, and seaside resorts.

Funnel cakes are made by pouring batter into hot cooking oil in a circular pattern and deep frying the overlapping mass until golden-brown. When made at concession stands, a pitcher with an integral funnel spout is employed.

Funnel cakes are typically served plain with powdered sugar, or with jam, cinnamon, Nutella, fresh fruit, or other toppings. In the book I'm Just Here for the Food, Alton Brown recommends they be baked with choux pastry, which expands from steam produced by its high water content.

In North America, funnel cakes were originally associated with the Pennsylvania Dutch region.

In Austrian cuisine the equivalent is called Strauben and is made and served similarly.


~~~

Choux pastry, or pâte à choux (pronounced: [pɑt a ʃu]), is a light pastry dough used to make profiteroles, croquembouches, éclairs, French crullers, beignets, St. Honoré cake, Indonesian kue sus, and gougères. It contains only butter, water, flour, and eggs. Like Yorkshire Pudding or David Eyre's pancake, instead of a raising agent it employs high moisture content to create steam during cooking to puff the pastry.

Choux pastry is usually baked but for beignets it is fried. In Spain and Latin America, churros are made of fried choux pastry, sugared and dipped in a thin chocolate blancmange for breakfast. In Austrian cuisine, it is also boiled to make Marillenknödel, a sweet apricot dumpling; in that case it does not puff, but remains relatively dense. They are sometimes filled with cream and used to make cream puffs or éclairs.[1]



Funnel Cake (with no toppings) in Coney Island
(Image 2012 (cc) David Sandbrand, Creative commons license 3.0)


A Pair of Choux Pastry Swans
(Image 2008 (cc) Foodista, Creative commons license 2.0)




So does funnel cake just taste like eating pure batter? In the texture of it.
I like the look of the fried bacon. The krispy kreme burger definitely too much though..the ultra sweetness with the burger just can't work together o.O
« Last Edit: June 04, 2013, 04:53:11 pm by lientie » Logged
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