The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 23, 2017, 12:51:49 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Steampunk tents, what kinds? for steampunk convention  (Read 11673 times)
Peter Brassbeard
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States



« Reply #50 on: April 18, 2013, 04:45:21 am »

Reading this, I had to look up the Boy Scouts Handbook The First Edition, 1911 www.gutenberg.org/files/29558/29558-h/29558-h.htm
It has a chapter "TENT MAKING MADE EASY" that describes several designs you could make on a budget if you don't mind roughing it.
Logged
Cpt. Vanderstorme
Officer
***
Netherlands Netherlands


It's the Captain, Lilith Vanderstorme!


WWW
« Reply #51 on: April 18, 2013, 02:20:17 pm »

Reading this, I had to look up the Boy Scouts Handbook The First Edition, 1911 www.gutenberg.org/files/29558/29558-h/29558-h.htm
It has a chapter "TENT MAKING MADE EASY" that describes several designs you could make on a budget if you don't mind roughing it.


Thanks for that, i have two boy scouts belts Theyre so cuuute <3.<3
but that would let it make sense too when i do it that way lol
Logged

Arabella Periscope
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Edwardian summer


« Reply #52 on: April 19, 2013, 01:21:21 am »



Can you borrow one like these? 

What are they, where can you get one?
Logged

Kenneth: 'If you're so hot, you can tell me how to say she has ideas above her station.'
Brian:'Oh yes, I forgot. It's fairly easy, old boy.
Elle a des idees au-dessus de sa gare.'
Kenneth: 'Idiot.  It's not that kind of station.'

Terence Rattigan 'French Without Tears.'
Octavius von Gilgamesh
Immortal
**
Australia Australia


Captain of the Ariadne's Sorrow


« Reply #53 on: April 23, 2013, 09:00:55 am »

These look interesting, especially if you have a large group.....

http://www.gigwam.co.uk/
Logged

May the gods stand between you and harm, in all the empty places where you must walk.
Cpt. Vanderstorme
Officer
***
Netherlands Netherlands


It's the Captain, Lilith Vanderstorme!


WWW
« Reply #54 on: April 25, 2013, 12:37:49 am »

sure looks interesting, but it isnt rly.. steampunk if i may be so rude
Logged
elShoggotho
Guest
« Reply #55 on: April 25, 2013, 04:38:13 am »

German black tent, yurt version. Traditional equipment for boy scouts and related people. It will survive any weather, is quite cool inside even in the middle of summer, you can light a fire (or run a steam boiler) inside due to the chimney, and it's good for a squad of fully armoured clanks. Drawbacks: you need a van to transport it, it takes three people minimum to set it up (seven would be a standard team), and it's quite expensive. Usual price new is around € 1,200.




Oh the amazingness I have seen with these things.  Have you seen the "Black Magic" setups done with these?
Something along the lines of this happens when several scout groups (and their tents) meet.
Logged
GCCC
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #56 on: May 08, 2013, 01:46:24 am »

"sure looks interesting, but it isnt rly.. steampunk if i may be so rude"

My dear Lady, simply ANYTHING can be made steampunk...(and I can certainly see the system in question being used as some sort of Morlock or similar encampment...)

BUT, I take your point. Previous posters have already offered a wide range of, in my opinion, quite excellent options. As I perceive matters, your primary concerns are going to be (a) portability (for ease of travel within your stated parameters), followed by (b) accessibility (i.e., how easy it is to obtain the tent/materials), and, I suspect, a combination of (c) & (d), affordability and time.

So, things to keep in mind when making your final selection(s):
If (c) and/or (d) are a factor, bear in mind you can do "quick-and-dirty" for this one event. In which case, procure an inexpensive, easily available commercial tent which meets your bare-minimum physical requirements (both portability on the train AND what needs to go inside the tent--in addition to yourself, of course) and then procure either a suitably patterned cloth (bedspread, curtain, etc.) that can be draped over this tent to camouflage the modernity. Remember, you don't have to be perfect on this first outing, and you can upgrade to something that's closer to what you want later, when you have more time and money.
If neither (c) nor (d) are an issue, bear in mind that you can still upgrade to something better after this event. For example, most any tent can be made to outwardly resemble some sort of dirigible or submersible (I will leave it to people more talented than I to figure out how). However, there's still the transport by train bit...
For (a), I would be inclined to suggest any of the "backpacker" tent models, designed to be carried on the back by hikers with all their other gear. Lightweight, doesn't take a lot of space, and I understand they're easy to setup. I'm also fond of the idea of the "pop-up" models (literally, they're a flat disk which you throw in the air and it lands unfolded and set up), although I've never tried one myself. With one of the backpacking pop-ups, you'll only need stakes to keep it from blowing away, so that cuts down on the gear you'd need to take. To make one of these steampunk "acceptable", I would try either the alternate fabric camouflage idea or the excellent silkscreen idea (the materials for which can be had relatively inexpensively at your local arts supply store; instructions can be obtained online).
For (b)...I got nuthin'. I will leave that to my European cousins, who will have a better grasp of what is convenient to your location.

Additionally, whatever your ultimate choice is, and irrespective of the concerns for cosmetic compatibility, you must consider what you need to be able to do in your tent:  What, besides yourself, needs to go inside? Can you change clothes inside? Is there room for you to sleep comfortably, in addition to being able to keep your gear and costuming safe and dry? For instance, you're young(er than myself; considerably so), which is to your advantage; you can get by with less room than some of us older ones require. Those of us who don't "bend" like we used to require an interior space that allows us to stand up completely, otherwise we'd never be able to get dressed. Those of us who can no longer tolerate the hard ground (and when I was your age, I could sleep without problem on pointy rocks) need substantially more bedding material. Are you fine crawling in and out of your tent, or do you want/need to be able to walk through the door flap? For example, when I was your age I could exist just fine in what used to be called a pup-tent (is it still? I have no idea). As I grew older, my physical requirements changed, and I progressively moved into roomier and taller tents. You, therefore, are the only one who can ascertain what you can get by with right now. Remember, you can upgrade later.

Above and beyond all this, however, is the most important single piece of advice I can impart:  Regardless your ultimate decision regarding your steampunk tent, remember that it doesn't matter if it impedes your enjoyment of your event. Whatever you do, the most critical thing is that you go to this soiree and HAVE FUN.

I, as I am sure others are, will be looking forward to your report not only on your ultimate tent choice but the event itself. Go forth, do great things, and again, have fun!
Logged
Clym Angus
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Lord of Misrule


WWW
« Reply #57 on: May 08, 2013, 07:18:55 pm »

Gigwam.... well in smooth vinyl I can fully understand your reservations it looks like a go anywhere S&M bordello (sigmund freud would have a field day)

BUT imagine if you will the Steampunk habitat! same design of homely colored canvas with copper trim! Turned in a self supporting hexagon of cross access.

YES! This has potential!

Hmmm you can make "castles" out of this stuff, it would be nice to be able to select how many doors you can put in and where. To be honest an adequate taylor or seamstress or talented and well read amateur could adjust this accordingly.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2013, 07:28:57 pm by Clym Angus » Logged

HPFlashman
Gunner
**
Norway Norway



« Reply #58 on: May 09, 2013, 02:14:56 am »

I`m with GCCC on this, there are some factors that needs to be adressed by the Honourable Miss Katarina, if the question should be reasonable answered.  Smiley

I may be new and somewhat curious as to the whole Steampunk scene, but I have do have around a 100 days a year in tents, varying from the small mountain tents to a variety of the Bell tents that housed 14 men easily. The latter complete with wood floors and woodburning stoves for the last 2,5 decades and you cant have your cake and eat it when it comes to tenting.

Tents are either light, portable and uncomfortable or heavy, sluggish and comfortable.  Shocked

If you have the inclination of making something yourself, the following link has in my opinion a rather interesting design: BAKER TENT which are a known and a correct Victorian era form. For one person I think it will be comfortable and light enough to lug around.  There are also commercial vendors of the Baker tent, but as I have no idea about how they fare, I wont post any links.  Smiley

Happy tent hunting and when you go, bring some sort of chair, preferably with a backrest, it will heighten the experience immensely.
Logged

With highest regards

Harry
Argus Fairbrass
Rogue Ætherlord
*
England England


So English even the English don't get it!


« Reply #59 on: May 09, 2013, 09:31:06 pm »

Hmm, interesting thread.

I must confess I haven't been camping for over a decade, but used to a lot in my youth.

I would agree on the subject of Steampunk tents, canvas seems the most authentic material, but my memories of it's performance in a heavy downpour were not always great.

Those were old tents though that probably needed re waterproofing. I understand you wanting to avoid the nylon nightmare syndrome, but canvas is pretty heavy and if you're on your own may not be the most practical solution.

I would have thought just a small classic shape nylon tent of either a white, cream, or khaki colour would pass with these Steampunk stitch counters (whoever they may be).

When I say classic shape I mean this.

http://www.heritagetents.co.uk/products/historic-wedge-tents.html

But if you really want canvas, I had a very small khaki one with a seperate ground sheet, all in all still quite heavy though. Rather than paying authentic re enactor prices (honest to god some people are charging ridiculous amounts for a canvas cover and a couple of polls). Instead see what army surplus might be available, as personal cover tents are I believe still used by the military, and should I would have thought be Steamy enough.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/offer-listing/B008GDPF9E?SubscriptionId=AKIAJ2AAONXYNQIB5SKQ&tag=100ad-21&linkCode=sp1&camp=2025&creative=12734&creativeASIN=B008GDPF9E

http://store.colemans.com/cart/tent-half-shelter-unused-single-p-2412.html
Logged

Have her steamed and brought to my tent!
GCCC
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #60 on: January 10, 2014, 10:32:58 am »

I haven't heard anything on this in a while...Has anyone heard from our young tent-seeker? I'm very curious to hear about her final solution, and to see pictures of same.
Logged
Cpt. Vanderstorme
Officer
***
Netherlands Netherlands


It's the Captain, Lilith Vanderstorme!


WWW
« Reply #61 on: January 11, 2014, 09:50:56 pm »

I haven't heard anything on this in a while...Has anyone heard from our young tent-seeker? I'm very curious to hear about her final solution, and to see pictures of same.

Heythar!
Yes i have heard from her haha:p
I didn't make one in the end. my friend had a little tent that happened to be allright for the ones organising the event. still though. I want to make one after all. thanks for commenting on here, this reminds me i still have to do this.

~ Cpt. V
Logged
Keith_Beef
Snr. Officer
****
France France


« Reply #62 on: January 11, 2014, 11:15:32 pm »

i dont even know what silk screens are?

Zeefdruk
Logged

--
Keith
GCCC
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #63 on: January 12, 2014, 07:19:10 am »

Ah! Very well, then...Please don't forget to post back here when you do; I'm still very curious as to the ultimate outcome.

Your servant,
GCCC
Logged
akumabito
Immortal
**
Netherlands Netherlands


Mundus Patria Nostra!


WWW
« Reply #64 on: January 12, 2014, 11:17:36 pm »

My dear Captain, if I remember correctly, you're not averse of some sewing. If that's the case, the most cost-effective answer might be to construct your own tent. While not as lush as some of the safari / campaign tents, the humble teepee could serve all your needs for a steamish festival/convention tent. You could make it as big or as small as you want. They are fairly easy to set up (as long as they're not too big/heavy) and you'll only need a couple yards of canvas and some poles. The pattern is essentially just half a circle with some added flaps.

You can see it quite clearly on this page - might give you a few ideas about decorating it as well..

http://www.tipi.com/design_your_tipi.php
Logged

Otto Von Pifka
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


goggles? they're here somewhere.....


« Reply #65 on: January 14, 2014, 11:59:56 am »

a giant beach umbrella can be converted with a few sheets for the sides.

most umbrellas are fairly lightweight and some of the pole centers unscrew for transport. the sides don't need to be as waterproof and can be made from either cheap bedsheets or from more expensive ripstop nylon. carpet runners can be cut to act as some ground cover and placed over a plastic tarp with a well placed hole for the umbrella pole.
a few tethers from the tiptop of the centerpole, out to a couple of tent stakes, can make it survive a few gusts of wind.

this is a great way to make a kids backyard tent on the cheap, BTW.

they even sell cheap led lights that go around the pole, like a little flying saucer, tons of light that make the whole thing glow at night.
Logged
CapnHarlock
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
United States United States



WWW
« Reply #66 on: January 15, 2014, 02:57:21 am »

I agree with Akumibito-san  - with a bit of effort, tipis can be "nearly perfect" shelters, in a lot of climates.

Before building a "modern" variant from online instructions, I would recommend reading "The Indian Tipi: Its History, Construction, and Use" by Reginald and Gladys Laubin.
1957
ISBN-10: 0806122366
ISBN-13: 978-0806122366

You still may build a quicker "weekend camping" version out of a tarp, and bamboo or conduit. You will still get good ideas about design and construction practices (primarily, it should not be a symmetrical cone, or the air-flow will fail), and a respect for the old traditions involved.

Logged

Jeremiah Cornelius Harlock
At Your Service

"It's so hard to know if you're bound for a fall,
But better to have tripped than never danced at all."
"Dancing Under The Rose" - The Albion Band.
Keith_Beef
Snr. Officer
****
France France


« Reply #67 on: January 15, 2014, 08:57:26 am »

Or for a really traditional shelter used by Gypsies, Tinkers and Travellers in the British Isles, build a "bender", so called because it is simply a canvas cover over bent (usually willow or hazel) poles that can often be found and cut on-site.
Logged
CPT_J_Percell
Board Moderator
Zeppelin Captain
**
England England


The werewolf Airship Captain.


WWW
« Reply #68 on: January 15, 2014, 06:29:46 pm »



My good man, you must put some gears on it to call it steampunk!
Logged

I suffer from a random misfiring synapse and a bad case of wolfen the turns me into a seven-foot-tall werewolf or a seven-foot great wolf!
https://dragon-rehoming-centre.myshopify.com/
http://purbry.wordpress.com
Cpt. Vanderstorme
Officer
***
Netherlands Netherlands


It's the Captain, Lilith Vanderstorme!


WWW
« Reply #69 on: January 16, 2014, 12:08:44 am »

My dear Captain, if I remember correctly, you're not averse of some sewing. If that's the case, the most cost-effective answer might be to construct your own tent. While not as lush as some of the safari / campaign tents, the humble teepee could serve all your needs for a steamish festival/convention tent. You could make it as big or as small as you want. They are fairly easy to set up (as long as they're not too big/heavy) and you'll only need a couple yards of canvas and some poles. The pattern is essentially just half a circle with some added flaps.

You can see it quite clearly on this page - might give you a few ideas about decorating it as well..

http://www.tipi.com/design_your_tipi.php


I sure am not averse of sewing indeed! Still making my own outfits at all times. Thanks for your comment, i randomly got inspired to design an entirely new tent.... Wowie, such inspirations. Will have to get back on this!
Logged
akumabito
Immortal
**
Netherlands Netherlands


Mundus Patria Nostra!


WWW
« Reply #70 on: January 16, 2014, 12:43:04 pm »

Looking forward to seeing it!
Logged
GCCC
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #71 on: February 17, 2014, 02:50:43 am »

Ran into this and thought this would be the most germane place to post it...

The manufacturers of this tent claim to have been inspired by airships, of all things. Either version (suspended or ground) are really pricey, but at least we've another possible solution to the question of what a Steampunk tent might look like...

http://www.treehugger.com/sustainable-product-design/luminair-tree-tents.html

I'm thinking that whether I hang it from the trees or use the tripod mount for terrestrial use, I'd want to paint the exterior like an adventurer's hot air balloon, and suspend a mock gondola/basket beneath, which would serve as the front porch/door, using the the "rigging" as the means of egress. Alternately, using the first image from the page, mock it into a Martian tripod...

Thoughts?
« Last Edit: February 17, 2014, 02:53:17 am by GCCC » Logged
IGetPwnedOften
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


If at first you don't succeed, use a bigger hammer


« Reply #72 on: February 18, 2014, 05:38:59 pm »

If that is indeed made from ash as they say, then lightweight is not a term I would use - I bet it weighs a ton. The design, however, certainly has potential and it looks quite roomy inside.
Logged

"Geoffrey, take their coats. No, not up the tree..."
ColeV
Gunner
**
United States United States



« Reply #73 on: February 24, 2014, 01:22:19 am »

I was recently part of a team that copied George Washington's Marquee tent (all hand-sewn with replicated fabric). We did make a number of smaller tents as well with commercial fabric. I'd highly recommend looking into hemp canvas. If stretched taught it's almost entirely water resistant and very sturdy. We got ours from Hemp Traders in the US, though I'm sure there are European sellers out there since much of the fabric comes from that market area still.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Logged
GCCC
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #74 on: February 24, 2014, 08:32:48 am »

Is its water-resistance a naturally occurring aspect of the material, or was it treated?
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.41 seconds with 16 queries.