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Author Topic: Steampunk tents, what kinds? for steampunk convention  (Read 11901 times)
Cpt. Vanderstorme
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« on: April 07, 2013, 03:06:52 pm »

Hello fellow steampunks,

I'm attending this dutch european steampunk convention in Meppel in july, and i want to be on the terrain with the steampunks, but i have no tent. What tent would be reccommended to get for this? does anyone know where to buy such thing? preferably in the netherlands, but any suggetion is welcome:)
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MWBailey
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"This is the sort of thing no-one ever believes"

rtafStElmo
« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2013, 03:30:08 pm »

Are you seeking a period-specific (late 1800s/Victorian, say) tent, or a modern item?

Most of the tents of the 1800s were made of canvas, from the rather flimsy so-called "cotton duck" variety to sacking material, to stuff that resembles a heavy-duty dropcloth. There're a few companies that make such things, but there are also patterns and instructions out on the web (or there used to be, at any rate) for making your own from things as mundane as painter's tarps and such. The types range from soldiers' pup tents to huge officer's and safari-type affairs. I'll post  a site, if I can find it; it's been a while since I've slept on the ground instead of in the car... (lol).


OoOpS... forgot to mention, some kind of waterproofing (Scotchguard at the minimum) is a good idea and might even be said to be imperative; also, seam-sealing measures come in handy as well.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2013, 03:41:31 pm by MWBailey » Logged

Walk softly and carry a big banjo...

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Cpt. Vanderstorme
Officer
***
Netherlands Netherlands


It's the Captain, Lilith Vanderstorme!


WWW
« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2013, 03:40:45 pm »

Are you seeking a period-specific (late 1800s/Victorian, say) tent, or a modern item?

Most of the tents of the 1800s were made of canvas, from the rather flimsy so-called "cotton duck" variety to sacking material, to stuff that resembles a heavy-duty dropcloth. There're a few companies that make such things, but there are also patterns and instructions out on the web (or there used to be, at any rate) for making your own from things as mundane as painter's tarps and such. The types range from soldiers' pup tents to huge officer's and safari-type affairs. I'll post  a site, if I can find it; it's been a while since I've slept on the ground instead of in the car... (lol).


Search for "canvas tent"

I could live in this...

haha lol^^ yeah if you could find one of such sites it'd be great!
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MWBailey
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United States United States


"This is the sort of thing no-one ever believes"

rtafStElmo
« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2013, 03:44:07 pm »

Are you seeking a period-specific (late 1800s/Victorian, say) tent, or a modern item?

Most of the tents of the 1800s were made of canvas, from the rather flimsy so-called "cotton duck" variety to sacking material, to stuff that resembles a heavy-duty dropcloth. There're a few companies that make such things, but there are also patterns and instructions out on the web (or there used to be, at any rate) for making your own from things as mundane as painter's tarps and such. The types range from soldiers' pup tents to huge officer's and safari-type affairs. I'll post  a site, if I can find it; it's been a while since I've slept on the ground instead of in the car... (lol).


Search for "canvas tent"




I could live in this...

haha lol^^ yeah if you could find one of such sites it'd be great!




Holy...

I wonder how many trucks it'd take to haul that thing around, lol.
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MWBailey
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"This is the sort of thing no-one ever believes"

rtafStElmo
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2013, 04:14:16 pm »

General Info, no patterns (at least as far as I could see), but some info on tent types:
http://buckskinning.org/lodge.htm




Shelter Half/Shelter Halves: This is the simplest type of canvas tent; literally two tarps buttoned together. They were the staple infantry enlisted tent almost the world over for most of the century. One soldier of an assigned or self-picked pair would carry one half of the tent (often one tarp and one pole, but types varied).
http://www.wwandcompany.com/store/us-items/shelter-halves.html

The "Wall Tent" about halfway down this page is the other most common type; it's the one that was most often associated with the Boy Scouts here in the US when I was a young 'un. I know several people who own this type, both reenactors and also just people who like to camp primitively.

http://www.fcsutler.com/fccanvas.asp
« Last Edit: April 07, 2013, 04:28:51 pm by MWBailey » Logged
Narsil
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« Reply #5 on: April 07, 2013, 04:27:20 pm »

Traditional type canvas tents are still reasonably easy to get hold of eg

http://www.armynnavy.com/catalog/catalog/product_info.php/products_id/6330

For a medium to long duration fixed camp these large canvas tents are excellent with a number of distinct advantages over more modern versions.

- They tend to be tough durable and easy to repair in the field
- As canvas is reasonably heat and spark resistant they can be lit and heated with candles, lanterns and stoves and can be used near open fires. In fact there are folding wood stoves available for traditional style tents.
-They are quite comfortable for long stays as canvas is naturally breathable they tend to be much less clammy and humid than coated nylon tents, especially in warmer weather.

On the downside they do tend to be rather heavy and are only really practical if you are traveling with a vehicle. They are also not necessarily as easy to put up and take down as a modern tent.

When choosing any tent there are quite a few different factors to consider. A larger tent will tend to be more comfortable, especially for longer stays and will give you more room to put your stuff. A covered porch is extremely useful for cooking etc in bad weather. However a smaller tent will of course tend to be lighter and stand up better to extreme weather as well as being warmer to sleep in (less volume to heat).

Similarly a double skinned tent will be warmer in cold weather and cooler in hot weather as well as being more rain-proof.

It's also worth noting that while most modern tents are made from coated nylon canvas tents rely on the tension of the fabric to shed water, this means that they need to be put up correctly to be properly weatherproof.

One possible compromise is to use a small modern tent to sleep in and also take a large canvas tarpaulin and perhaps some poles to erect an awning to provide shade and a covered area for bad weather.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2013, 04:35:33 pm by Narsil » Logged







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Cpt. Vanderstorme
Officer
***
Netherlands Netherlands


It's the Captain, Lilith Vanderstorme!


WWW
« Reply #6 on: April 07, 2013, 04:46:36 pm »

Traditional type canvas tents are still reasonably easy to get hold of eg

http://www.armynnavy.com/catalog/catalog/product_info.php/products_id/6330

For a medium to long duration fixed camp these large canvas tents are excellent with a number of distinct advantages over more modern versions.

- They tend to be tough durable and easy to repair in the field
- As canvas is reasonably heat and spark resistant they can be lit and heated with candles, lanterns and stoves and can be used near open fires. In fact there are folding wood stoves available for traditional style tents.
-They are quite comfortable for long stays as canvas is naturally breathable they tend to be much less clammy and humid than coated nylon tents, especially in warmer weather.

On the downside they do tend to be rather heavy and are only really practical if you are traveling with a vehicle. They are also not necessarily as easy to put up and take down as a modern tent.

When choosing any tent there are quite a few different factors to consider. A larger tent will tend to be more comfortable, especially for longer stays and will give you more room to put your stuff. A covered porch is extremely useful for cooking etc in bad weather. However a smaller tent will of course tend to be lighter and stand up better to extreme weather as well as being warmer to sleep in (less volume to heat).

Similarly a double skinned tent will be warmer in cold weather and cooler in hot weather as well as being more rain-proof.

It's also worth noting that while most modern tents are made from coated nylon canvas tents rely on the tension of the fabric to shed water, this means that they need to be put up correctly to be properly weatherproof.

One possible compromise is to use a small modern tent to sleep in and also take a large canvas tarpaulin and perhaps some poles to erect an awning to provide shade and a covered area for bad weather.


I got one little suitcase on weels as luggage and i'm going by train. it's only for 2 days too
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Narsil
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« Reply #7 on: April 07, 2013, 05:16:21 pm »

Traditional type canvas tents are still reasonably easy to get hold of eg

http://www.armynnavy.com/catalog/catalog/product_info.php/products_id/6330

For a medium to long duration fixed camp these large canvas tents are excellent with a number of distinct advantages over more modern versions.

- They tend to be tough durable and easy to repair in the field
- As canvas is reasonably heat and spark resistant they can be lit and heated with candles, lanterns and stoves and can be used near open fires. In fact there are folding wood stoves available for traditional style tents.
-They are quite comfortable for long stays as canvas is naturally breathable they tend to be much less clammy and humid than coated nylon tents, especially in warmer weather.

On the downside they do tend to be rather heavy and are only really practical if you are traveling with a vehicle. They are also not necessarily as easy to put up and take down as a modern tent.

When choosing any tent there are quite a few different factors to consider. A larger tent will tend to be more comfortable, especially for longer stays and will give you more room to put your stuff. A covered porch is extremely useful for cooking etc in bad weather. However a smaller tent will of course tend to be lighter and stand up better to extreme weather as well as being warmer to sleep in (less volume to heat).

Similarly a double skinned tent will be warmer in cold weather and cooler in hot weather as well as being more rain-proof.

It's also worth noting that while most modern tents are made from coated nylon canvas tents rely on the tension of the fabric to shed water, this means that they need to be put up correctly to be properly weatherproof.

One possible compromise is to use a small modern tent to sleep in and also take a large canvas tarpaulin and perhaps some poles to erect an awning to provide shade and a covered area for bad weather.


I got one little suitcase on weels as luggage and i'm going by train. it's only for 2 days too


I think with that in mind a traditional canvas tent is probably out then Smiley 

I've used quite a few tents and shelters over the years from a simple trap fixed to a tree to serious mountain tents.

If you are traveling by train then it is probably best to go for light weight, for festival type use a cheap, small 2 man tent should be absolutely fine. Many manufacturers now make tents specifically designed for festivals eg

http://www.millets.co.uk/equipment/112665-eurohike-record-pop-up-tent-multi.html

Something like that won't give you a huge amount of space but as you can't carry that much anyway that shouldn't be a problem.
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Cpt. Vanderstorme
Officer
***
Netherlands Netherlands


It's the Captain, Lilith Vanderstorme!


WWW
« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2013, 05:18:33 pm »

Traditional type canvas tents are still reasonably easy to get hold of eg

http://www.armynnavy.com/catalog/catalog/product_info.php/products_id/6330

For a medium to long duration fixed camp these large canvas tents are excellent with a number of distinct advantages over more modern versions.

- They tend to be tough durable and easy to repair in the field
- As canvas is reasonably heat and spark resistant they can be lit and heated with candles, lanterns and stoves and can be used near open fires. In fact there are folding wood stoves available for traditional style tents.
-They are quite comfortable for long stays as canvas is naturally breathable they tend to be much less clammy and humid than coated nylon tents, especially in warmer weather.

On the downside they do tend to be rather heavy and are only really practical if you are traveling with a vehicle. They are also not necessarily as easy to put up and take down as a modern tent.

When choosing any tent there are quite a few different factors to consider. A larger tent will tend to be more comfortable, especially for longer stays and will give you more room to put your stuff. A covered porch is extremely useful for cooking etc in bad weather. However a smaller tent will of course tend to be lighter and stand up better to extreme weather as well as being warmer to sleep in (less volume to heat).

Similarly a double skinned tent will be warmer in cold weather and cooler in hot weather as well as being more rain-proof.

It's also worth noting that while most modern tents are made from coated nylon canvas tents rely on the tension of the fabric to shed water, this means that they need to be put up correctly to be properly weatherproof.

One possible compromise is to use a small modern tent to sleep in and also take a large canvas tarpaulin and perhaps some poles to erect an awning to provide shade and a covered area for bad weather.


I got one little suitcase on weels as luggage and i'm going by train. it's only for 2 days too


I think with that in mind a traditional canvas tent is probably out then Smiley 

I've used quite a few tents and shelters over the years from a simple trap fixed to a tree to serious mountain tents.

If you are traveling by train then it is probably best to go for light weight, for festival type use a cheap, small 2 man tent should be absolutely fine. Many manufacturers now make tents specifically designed for festivals eg

http://www.millets.co.uk/equipment/112665-eurohike-record-pop-up-tent-multi.html

Something like that won't give you a huge amount of space but as you can't carry that much anyway that shouldn't be a problem.



nonono, you get me all wrong! i need a stempunk tent! an actual steampunktent, or i wont be able to put it up next to the steampunk people
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MWBailey
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United States United States


"This is the sort of thing no-one ever believes"

rtafStElmo
« Reply #9 on: April 07, 2013, 05:54:29 pm »

Seems to me the shelter halves or "A" type would be best, then.
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Stella Gaslight
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« Reply #10 on: April 07, 2013, 06:09:40 pm »

Ahh but modern peices will work just fine with some camouflage.  We use canvas tents for some sca events and they are heavy as heck so we came up with a light and easy version of this

Take one patio umbrella and find some fabric to match the top. (waterproof is best) then make your walls and either sew or safty pin in to place leaving an opening in the front. Add some gromits for staking decorate it up a bit and you have a pretty tent that looks like it is from another time without needing a crew to haul it.
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Cpt. Vanderstorme
Officer
***
Netherlands Netherlands


It's the Captain, Lilith Vanderstorme!


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« Reply #11 on: April 07, 2013, 06:27:31 pm »

Ahh but modern peices will work just fine with some camouflage.  We use canvas tents for some sca events and they are heavy as heck so we came up with a light and easy version of this

Take one patio umbrella and find some fabric to match the top. (waterproof is best) then make your walls and either sew or safty pin in to place leaving an opening in the front. Add some gromits for staking decorate it up a bit and you have a pretty tent that looks like it is from another time without needing a crew to haul it.


O. M. Genius.
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Captain
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« Reply #12 on: April 07, 2013, 06:51:11 pm »



Can you borrow one like these? 
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-Karl
Stella Gaslight
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« Reply #13 on: April 07, 2013, 06:52:38 pm »

Just make sure you have the overlapping bit that comes down from the canopy and goes over the start of the walls.  It realy helps keep rain out.  And try it out in your back yard before depending on it.  We found out we needed more stakes than we thought.
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akumabito
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« Reply #14 on: April 07, 2013, 07:27:20 pm »

Traditional type canvas tents are still reasonably easy to get hold of eg

http://www.armynnavy.com/catalog/catalog/product_info.php/products_id/6330


Katarina, de Vrijbuiter had een eenvoudige canvas tent die daar wel wat op leek voor nog geen 150 euro.
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Cpt. Vanderstorme
Officer
***
Netherlands Netherlands


It's the Captain, Lilith Vanderstorme!


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« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2013, 07:31:47 pm »

Traditional type canvas tents are still reasonably easy to get hold of eg

http://www.armynnavy.com/catalog/catalog/product_info.php/products_id/6330


Katarina, de Vrijbuiter had een eenvoudige canvas tent die daar wel wat op leek voor nog geen 150 euro.


srsly?
waar vind ik dat? is dat ook online?
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oldskoolpunk
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« Reply #16 on: April 07, 2013, 10:03:00 pm »


Festival tent, black, small, UKP60.

Start with one of these small festival tents in black. Silk-screen appropriate patterns (gears, arcane symbols, etc.) on the black surface.  Small enough to carry (64x7cm cylinder bag w/shoulder straps), reasonably comfortable, sleeps 2, not too expensive.
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Stella Gaslight
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« Reply #17 on: April 07, 2013, 10:28:16 pm »

Slik screen inks are pretty easy to find and thined they paint on well. Just rember to heat set it or you will have problems.
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Cpt. Vanderstorme
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It's the Captain, Lilith Vanderstorme!


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« Reply #18 on: April 07, 2013, 11:21:31 pm »

i dont even know what silk screens are?
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Stella Gaslight
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« Reply #19 on: April 07, 2013, 11:39:27 pm »

Have you ever seen a printed t shirt?  It is the ink they use to that. You can use it with slik screens wich are like stencles or you can paint it on.  I sugest thinning it a bit if you are painting it on because most of them are pretty thick out of the bottle.
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CapnHarlock
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« Reply #20 on: April 08, 2013, 12:45:12 am »

Miss Katarina;

if in a warm. dry area, consider sewing together 2-3 large , dark. wool-blend blankets for an "Arabic" look tent

If not, a old.  military-surplus canvas puptent is a good choice.

In any case, a s USED copy of "Tents, Architecture of the Nomads"  by Torvald Faegre ( ISBN 038511656X )
http://www.amazon.com/Tents-Architecture-Nomads-Torvald-Faegre/dp/038511656X#  will provide a lot of ideas for the future.

PLEASE do not forget "modern'" waterproof groundcloths and something comfortable for under your bedroll.





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« Reply #21 on: April 08, 2013, 03:12:08 am »

You could go for something different, a geodesic dome, yurt, or teepee would stand out.
The half wall military style tents would also work well.
Building on small mobiltrailer can work well I have sceen the gypsy carts,English cottage, and even japanese tea house turnout great depending on how much work has gone into the project.

There are more and more micro homes that proform well.
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Mimsy Beaucoup
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« Reply #22 on: April 08, 2013, 10:10:07 am »


We do authentic victorian and edwardian camping and use canvas bell tents, we love them, huge and spacious and comfortable to live in.





Here is where we get them from
https://www.canvastentshop.co.uk/products/canvas-tents/bell-tents.aspx

Just make sure if they get wet you air dry them, so you will need a room big enough to lay it out or a garden to put it up, this is true of all canvas tents. Canvas is way better than nylon etc tents, not roasting in sunshine, no condensation and waterproof naturally.
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George Salt
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« Reply #23 on: April 08, 2013, 11:26:02 am »


We do authentic victorian and edwardian camping and use canvas bell tents, we love them, huge and spacious and comfortable to live in.



I love it!

But I have to ask, how do you transport the bed?  Is it a lightweight frame bed? or something inflatable?
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markf
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« Reply #24 on: April 08, 2013, 11:46:18 am »

I imagine the range of tents will vary wildly, from simple to extravagantly steamy, but this one would be a home in any environment (despite a faulty chameleon circuit). markf

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