The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 23, 2017, 09:29:33 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Trouble with drawing  (Read 1466 times)
DR.Robert Quincey Bobbins
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« on: February 18, 2013, 03:34:44 pm »

Hello

 I am currently haveing trouble drawing mechicanical bits into my artwork and was wondering if anyone could give me pointers? My Zeppilins area jumbled mess and don't get me started on my drawbridge. Cry
Logged

What? your bicycle broke?........well you're the one that wanted it collapsible
Inflatable Friend
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Italy Italy



« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2013, 04:04:07 pm »

Practice, draw from life using whatever mechanical objects you can find, practise, make models, even rough volumes, practice, practice, draw more from life, practice and maybe use photographs for reference (don't use other peoples art for reference, just for inspiration).

There are a few good books on mechanical drawing, both technical and more imaginary. If you'd like once I get home I can dig out a few titles or web links.

Oh, and practice (really, practise and pushing yourself is everything when it comes to art. That and drawing what you see, not what you think you do).
Logged
Narsil
Immortal
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom



WWW
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2013, 04:33:11 pm »

Yeah, drawing requires lots of practice and drawing objects from life is one of the best ways to learn.

There are two key skills that you need to develop to draw well. The first is the motor control and hand-eye coordination to be able to physically control the marks you make on the paper. The second thing is the analytical ability to really see and analyse what is in front of you.

When you look at something a lot of what you 'see' is built up by your brain assuming what is there based on a few clues and you prior knowledge of what you expect to see. To be able to draw well you need to learn to visually analyse things in much greater detail. Both of these skills can be learned by practice.

It's also well worth getting a few books of anatomy for artists, these can often be found relatively cheaply in budget art shops and online. Copying anatomical drawings is a good way to sharpen up your technical skills and drawing from life is good for improving your observation.

It can be very useful  to practice drawing quickly. Collect a few interesting objects, pick one at random and give yourself a strict 5 minute time limit to draw it, after 5 minutes stop and try again with something else. This will force you to focus on the most important aspects of the form an not get bogged down on detail. If you do this for half an hour every day you will soon notice an improvement.

It is also well worth practising drawing simple geometric shapes in isometric and perspective views as these are the basic elements for blocking out more complex structures.

Also if you are drawing geometric structures (like airships)  there is nothing wrong with using instruments like rulers, compasses and templates to get the proportions accurate.

Another good tip is to give yourself plenty of room to work, it's often easier to work on large sheets of paper, especially if you are trying to draw something complex. You can always crop it down to size later if you want.


Don't worry about making your drawings pretty or trying to copy a particular style, concentrate on getting them clear and accurate and your own style will develop naturally.

Also don't expect  a drawing to look good straight away, you will often need to go through several versions before something looks right but you need to keep plugging away at it.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2013, 04:46:48 pm by Narsil » Logged







A man of eighty has outlived probably three new schools of painting, two of architecture and poetry and a hundred in dress.
Lord Byron
Lady Ava
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Gravatar

Adventurer, Dress-maker and General All-Round Awesome.

electrogirlak
WWW
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2013, 04:34:19 pm »

Drawing makes me a very sad lady.
I can pretty much only draw from observations, the other posters are correct when they say practice like your life depends on it.
Logged

''I'm a loose bolt in a complete machine. What a match! I'm half-doomed and you're semi-sweet.''
‎"You want steampunk to be a novelty, a LOLcat, a meme. I want it to be my life. Which of us is going to fight harder for it?" - Dimitri Markotin
*DISCLAIMER*     This dungeon is fictional, and any similarities to other dungeons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.


http://www.facebook.com/antevortefashion
Mention you're from BG when ordering for free shipping!
RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
*****


« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2013, 05:12:08 pm »

Are drafting courses still offered by schools?
Logged
MechanicalMouse
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


A tall mouse with huge cogs!


« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2013, 05:47:01 pm »

And don't worry about posting pictures up, there are plenty of people here who would give honest, politely worded critical advise.
Logged
Captain Marcus Stahlsturm
Gunner
**
England England


Scoundrel, rascal, pirate captain and philosopher


« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2013, 07:36:07 pm »

Reference! Definitely use references. It's a near impossibility to draw from memory or imagination. Trying to draw a zeppelin? Find pictures of zeppelins as reference
Logged

"zombies Cap'n, thousands of 'em!"
"How many thousands, matey?"
MechanicalMouse
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


A tall mouse with huge cogs!


« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2013, 09:04:04 pm »

Another idea for reference work is to assemble objects of the rough shape of the desired composition, such as boxes, lego, bottles and so on which you can use to get the main shapes right. Its easier to then add the details.
Logged
DR.Robert Quincey Bobbins
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2013, 09:28:56 pm »

Thanks everyone

That was all good advice I'll post my drawing when I am finished witth it.Most of my drawings are black and white,I tend to stray from color they never turn out as planned.
Logged
Captain Marcus Stahlsturm
Gunner
**
England England


Scoundrel, rascal, pirate captain and philosopher


« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2013, 09:30:30 pm »

Another idea for reference work is to assemble objects of the rough shape of the desired composition, such as boxes, lego, bottles and so on which you can use to get the main shapes right. Its easier to then add the details.
This is especially good for getting the perspective right as you will have a 3D model that you can position however you like
Logged
DR.Robert Quincey Bobbins
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2013, 03:20:21 am »

ok thanks
look forward to some knew artwork by yours truly
Logged
DR.Robert Quincey Bobbins
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #11 on: February 19, 2013, 03:23:21 am »

sorry I meant new sometimes thinking of an idea and typeing a reply gets my brain all confused and I lose my train of thought
Logged
Kevin C Cooper Esq
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Asymetry is the bane of my life


WWW
« Reply #12 on: February 19, 2013, 09:40:32 pm »

I was blessed with a natural ability to draw, that is to draw from life and to copy pictures, but I can draw very little from imagination, unless it's a plan for a shed! So as others have said use reference material whenever possible, and as others have also said, practice, practise, practise and then practise some more.
Logged

Narsil
Immortal
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom



WWW
« Reply #13 on: February 19, 2013, 11:38:14 pm »

I was blessed with a natural ability to draw, that is to draw from life and to copy pictures, but I can draw very little from imagination, unless it's a plan for a shed! So as others have said use reference material whenever possible, and as others have also said, practice, practise, practise and then practise some more.


On the subject of natural drawing ability it's worth mentioning that it's great if you are lucky enough to have a natural ability at anything but it would be wrong to be put off by assuming that just because you don't have a natural talent for drawing you will never be able to draw well.

For most people drawing is a learned skill, acquired by study and practice, depending on your basic aptitude and experience this learning curve may be more or less steep. What is important is that you do the right sort of practice. What constitutes the 'right' practice depends to a degree on what you are trying to achieve  although there are certain basics like life and still life drawing as well as the principles of shade and perspective which will stand you in good stead.

As with most things the best practice is exercise which stretch you. Casually doodling is a perfectly good activity in itself but it won't do much to improve your drawing technique. The way to do that is to draw things which you find difficult. These may not necessarily be things that you particularly want to draw but stretching yourself will make the things you do want to do that much easier.  

It's also important not to let yourself be intimidated by looking at exquisitely rendered graphic images and feeling that you will never be that good. For a start specialist illustrators are just that, specialists, who devote the majority of their effort to producing drawings and illustrations which are intended as works of art in their own right, However the majority of practical drawings are produced to record and communicate ideas with the minimum of fuss and bother and its gaining fluency in the fundamentals of scale, proportion, line and observation which will allow you to do this.  

Perhaps the most fundamental skill is the ability to look at (or imagine) a scene, determine what are the key elements and put them down on paper with the minimum expenditure of pencil. A good way to develop this is to attempt to draw things which are basically impossible to render 'photographically' things like tangles of string, gnarled trees, piles of pasta, rice etc etc. These sorts of exercise will force you to think a bit more creatively about the link between what you see and what you put down on paper. It will also help you to work out how complex scenes like leaves and branches  on a tree work visually.  It will also help you to break down the assumptions between what you actually see and what you know to be there.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2013, 10:56:56 am by Narsil » Logged
MechanicalMouse
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


A tall mouse with huge cogs!


« Reply #14 on: February 20, 2013, 08:02:19 am »

Wonderful advice
Logged
DR.Robert Quincey Bobbins
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #15 on: February 20, 2013, 02:50:59 pm »

Very good advice indeed to everyone involved reading this post has given me the courage to PRESS ONWARD TO VICTORY!!!!!!(or in most cases artistic death.) Smiley
Logged
von Corax
Squire of the Lambda Calculus
Moderator
Immortal
*
Canada Canada

Prof. Darwin Prætorius von Corax


« Reply #16 on: February 21, 2013, 05:46:04 am »

There are a few good books on mechanical drawing, both technical and more imaginary. If you'd like once I get home I can dig out a few titles or web links.

OHYESPLEASEYESPLEASEYESPLEASE!

*Ahem*

Yes, I believe a list of titles and links would be appreciated.
Logged

By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
By the Beans of Life do my thoughts acquire speed
My hands acquire a shaking
The shaking becomes a warning
By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
The Leverkusen Institute of Paleocybernetics is 5838 km from Reading
DR.Robert Quincey Bobbins
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #17 on: February 21, 2013, 07:32:31 pm »

I agree with von Corax
Logged
Birdnest
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States



WWW
« Reply #18 on: February 21, 2013, 09:59:24 pm »

As a designer / drafter for many years ... I have come to love that ever present resource known as Google.  There are loads of great tutorials for programs ... such as Autocad ... on how to draw << your thing here >>.  You don't really need to own some program to gain useful information about setting up the drafting geometry for any desired 'mechanical bits'.

To badly paraphrase Narsil ... don't get discouraged by the apparent complexity. Start simple and build from there (i.e. learn the basics and build your skills from there).  Just dive in and practice practice practice.
Logged

Onward ho!
von Corax
Squire of the Lambda Calculus
Moderator
Immortal
*
Canada Canada

Prof. Darwin Prætorius von Corax


« Reply #19 on: February 22, 2013, 04:23:47 am »

As a designer / drafter for many years ... I have come to love that ever present resource known as Google.  There are loads of great tutorials for programs ... such as Autocad ... on how to draw << your thing here >>.

Two problems with Google: first, there are loads of crappy tutorials as well as loads of great tutorials, and second, if you don't know what you're looking for it's a lot harder to find it.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.265 seconds with 17 queries.