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Author Topic: Fibrous plaster work  (Read 1284 times)
Kevin C Cooper Esq
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« on: February 10, 2013, 05:10:32 pm »

I thought some of you would be interested in this. Especially if you've been considering remodelling a room in the house.
Creating a Plaster Cast Dome and Pendentives - Ryedale Plasterers Limted
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Hez
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aka Miss Primrose C Leigh


« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2013, 07:23:55 pm »

Thank you, I enjoyed that.  I particularly like seeing young people making a living at ancient crafts as it reassures me that the techniques and talents aren't going extinct.

If you want to make something on a smaller scale:
I used to use plaster cast rolls (the stuff they use on broken arms) to make molds of hands.  We could then use high temperature plastics to create splints for people with arthritis.  If you try this use lots of vaseline on your arm or the hair will come off with the mold.  You also have to make sure that the front and back of the mold touch but do not overlap, draw down in between the edges of the front and back fabric strips with a pencil so they separate for removal.  When you put the mold back together just use another strip of cast material over the join.  It will seal on even after the first pieces are dry.
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Drew P
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« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2013, 07:43:49 pm »

Kevin,thank you so much for that! Such wonderful work-inspiring!

Gosh,I've got to go make something.
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Maets
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« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2013, 09:51:46 pm »

Fascinating. Great find.
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Narsil
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« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2013, 09:57:28 pm »

Thank you, I enjoyed that.  I particularly like seeing young people making a living at ancient crafts as it reassures me that the techniques and talents aren't going extinct.

If you want to make something on a smaller scale:
I used to use plaster cast rolls (the stuff they use on broken arms) to make molds of hands.  We could then use high temperature plastics to create splints for people with arthritis.  If you try this use lots of vaseline on your arm or the hair will come off with the mold.  You also have to make sure that the front and back of the mold touch but do not overlap, draw down in between the edges of the front and back fabric strips with a pencil so they separate for removal.  When you put the mold back together just use another strip of cast material over the join.  It will seal on even after the first pieces are dry.

I would add that while plaster bandage is safe to use for life casting you should never attempt to cast body parts by immersing them in mixed plaster. There are two reasons for this firstly the plaster cast can lock onto the body-part, making it difficult to remove and secondly plaster sets by a chemical reaction which generates heat, in even a moderate thickness of plaster this heat can be enough to cause severe burns

The drying effect of plaster can also cause problems for models with sensitive skin. If in doubt alginate is the safest material for making body casts as it is hypo-allergenic and remains soft enough to be removed quickly in the event of a problem. It also has practical benefits in terms of taking surface detail.

Having said that the practice described above of taking limb and body moulds with plaster bandage is absolutely fine, although it may be wise to test a small area of skin on the model for any adverse reactions (which are admittedly rare). 
« Last Edit: February 10, 2013, 10:06:30 pm by Narsil » Logged







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Kevin C Cooper Esq
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Asymetry is the bane of my life


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« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2013, 12:01:48 am »

Kevin,thank you so much for that! Such wonderful work-inspiring!

Gosh,I've got to go make something.
Yes I've got some grand plans, I've started small with a ceiling rose design.
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Kevin C Cooper Esq
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« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2013, 12:03:14 am »

I would second what Narsil said Re: life casting, I use alginate to make hand and foot casts of babies and children.
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Hez
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« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2013, 07:05:03 am »

I was actually thinking of small scale architectural work using the plaster bandages rather than the alternating plaster, mesh plaster or the big pieces.  We used alginate for facial molds (burn scar management) but the plaster strips were adequate and much cheaper for hands.
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Kevin C Cooper Esq
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« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2013, 11:59:04 am »

I was actually thinking of small scale architectural work using the plaster bandages rather than the alternating plaster, mesh plaster or the big pieces.  We used alginate for facial molds (burn scar management) but the plaster strips were adequate and much cheaper for hands.
I suppose it would depend on the quantity required weighed up against the cost, would plaster bandages be cheaper than plaster and hessian bought from a builders Merchant?
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Hez
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« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2013, 06:15:16 pm »

Certainly would if you were doing scale models.
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Kevin C Cooper Esq
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« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2013, 07:30:49 pm »

Certainly would if you were doing scale models.
Yes, not quite the way I interpreted "small scale architectural work".
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Hez
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« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2013, 03:52:46 am »

Certainly would if you were doing scale models.
Yes, not quite the way I interpreted "small scale architectural work".

I have a cold and my communication skills have gone splurb.  Along with my typing coordination and my spelling.
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Twosoc
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« Reply #12 on: February 15, 2013, 07:06:03 pm »

You can't really go wrong with buying in bulk it always comes in handy. If you're in the UK Clayman have very reasonable prices.
A cheaper alternative to hessian is the chopped strands used in fibre glassing, sometime known as choppies. or you can get it in standard sheets.
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53Bash
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« Reply #13 on: February 15, 2013, 08:15:55 pm »

5 kg isn't "bulk".  When I was in art school we had 50 lbs bags of molding plaster.  One piece I did, I used about a dozen of those bags.  Granted, the results were absurdly heavy (I didn't plan the armature very well) but the piece wasn't much bigger than the item shown in the video (and was actually made much the same way - it was essentially  a large ball with an opening and internal decoration).
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Kevin C Cooper Esq
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Asymetry is the bane of my life


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« Reply #14 on: February 15, 2013, 09:42:19 pm »

You can't really go wrong with buying in bulk it always comes in handy. If you're in the UK Clayman have very reasonable prices.
A cheaper alternative to hessian is the chopped strands used in fibre glassing, sometime known as choppies. or you can get it in standard sheets.

It completely slipped my mind that some of the plaster guys use glass fibre for reinforcement, and I should know, I used to own a glass fibre business and I made moulds for the ornamental plaster trade. (It was a long time ago though.
If you want large quantities of plaster any good builders merchant should stock casting plaster and usually much cheaper than art materials stockists.
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Twosoc
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« Reply #15 on: February 16, 2013, 06:53:30 pm »

Quote
5 kg isn't "bulk".
 Its a drop down menu, they go to 25 kilo sacks I believe, the more you buy the cheaper it is.  I've found the best way to mix in the choppies is to use a paint stirrer on a drill, this way it separates the clumps and disperses the fibres in the plaster. Its better if you can vac it afterwards but not essential.

Plaster wise, you really don't need to buy expensive "dental" or industrial plaster as you'll be adding reinforcement anyway, sometimes the expensive plasters only contain added cement powder.  Usually if it doesn't have an unusual name like herculite etc, its bog standard casting plaster, with suitable reinforcement it will hold up to most applications.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2013, 06:59:25 pm by Twosoc » Logged
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