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Author Topic: Soda blasting to prep plastic for spray painting?  (Read 6507 times)
Professor J. Cogsworthy
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« on: February 08, 2013, 06:31:28 pm »

Has anyone here ever used soda blasting to prep glossy plastics for spray painting?
I was thinking it would be an easy way to 'scuff' the glossy surfaces to help
them hang on the the paint better....

I'm thinking about putting together a DIY rig to try it... unless someone
here has already found out it will not work like I hope it will.

DIY Soda Blaster final build.
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No, no no, a thousand times no. Its pronounced - lah-BOHR-ah-tor-ee
53Bash
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« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2013, 06:48:42 pm »

When I end up buying 4-realz soda blaster I'll give it a test.  I expect it would work pretty well, unless the plastic is REALLY abrasive resistant (kevar, plastic cutting boards).  ABS and PVC plastic would probably be good test materials - they are pretty tough but not hard to get hands on, and paint tends to scuff off them easily even with priming.

Krylon "fusion" paints are made for glossy plastic.
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Drew P
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« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2013, 03:08:29 am »

I've used Fusion paint before=wouldn't trust it again for glossy stuff. Then again it took 3 years to come off.
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Robert E. Lee
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« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2013, 05:06:04 am »

I'm currently trying the fusion paint on a plastic airsoft pistol as a primer coat.  I'll apply a flat finish over that when it's fully cured.

I've used the fusion on plastic storage drawers and, properly cured, I've found it to be reasonably durable.
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Lokis_Tyro
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« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2013, 08:10:09 am »

If it doesn't work you can always change media if you're setup for it. I can't watch the video so sorry if this is redundant information in the link I'm going to provide. I used this as a guide to create mine.

http://www.aircooledtech.com/tools-on-the-cheap/soda_blaster/
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Lokis_Tyro
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« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2013, 08:12:49 am »

I forgot to add that in addition to that setup I added ceramic nozzles which can be had for next to nothing. I bought mine from Harbor Freight, which is one of those cheap-o tool chains. I believe they were 5 for 10 dollars.
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Drew P
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« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2013, 11:47:22 pm »

O,thank you,thank you,thank you! Smiley
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IGetPwnedOften
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If at first you don't succeed, use a bigger hammer


« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2013, 12:20:56 am »

Don't knock Harbor Freight - when I used to visit the US a lot in my youth, I spent many a happy hour wandering around the HF store in Springfield, MO. The first time I visited I bought a sliding power mitre saw and some clamps, and I'm still using them today, and that was nearly 20 years ago. I've got loads of tools, clamps and all sorts I bought in there for next to nothing compared to UK prices - take foam brushes for example; I bought a pack of 24 for less than $5, whereas in the UK you can easily expect to pay that much for one. I used to spend hundreds of dollars in there, then put everything in a big box and send it home via the USPS. Took maybe three weeks and saved me a fortune.

Anyway, on topic... What benefit do you get from the blasting? I must confess I've never had a problem painting glossy surfaces, unless it was with acrylic paint, but even then if I'm careful and give it several coats it seems to be OK. I appreciate roughing up the surface makes the paint adhere better, but is it worth it compared to the extra effort of blasting it first?

I'm not trying to be funny, I'm genuinely curious - maybe I'm missing a trick here.

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"Geoffrey, take their coats. No, not up the tree..."
Professor J. Cogsworthy
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Aude Aliquid Dignum


« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2013, 09:19:39 pm »

The idea was  all based on making the paint stick better and looking at how easy it looks like it is to put one of these together...

MUCH faster than trying to scuff the surface by hand....


and I'm sure it it works for the plastic I'll find other things to use it for also.
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