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Author Topic: Scroll Paper  (Read 10266 times)
Dreebus Cole
Deck Hand
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United States United States


« on: February 01, 2013, 10:21:17 pm »

Does anyone know what would be the best type of paper to use to make scrolls?  In this case, a scroll around 15 meters in total length, and around 30cm wide (can be flexible depending on available materials).
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Sam Watson
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


Steampunk Cowboy


« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2013, 10:32:50 pm »

Basically, any kind of paper you like. Original scrolls were made mostly of either papyrus or parchment, neither of which come in long sheets. They were just glued together to make the right size.

If you do want a long uninterrupted strip, you can buy a roll of paper at an art store, and cut the height and length you want.
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Samuel Xavier Watson
Narsil
Immortal
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



WWW
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2013, 10:38:01 pm »

Calico or fine canvas would be ideal, strong, tough and flexible and relatively inexpensive. Note that you can usually get sized canvas and calico much cheaper from fabric wholesalers than from art shops (which generally charge a massive premium for absolutely everything).

If you want to draw, write or paint on it it would be best to prepare it by treating it with size (essentially thin glue used to seal the fibres) and perhaps a primer. There are a few different types of size and primer available in both traditional and modern types.

If you want something really luxurious then a soft leather would be very good but relatively expensive, although if it's for a special project you might be able to fine seconds and offcuts for an acceptable price. If you shop around you might be able to get the required quantity of pig or goatskin hide for sensible money.

The real premium writing media are vellum/parchment (made from stretched and scraped animal hides) and linen paper (the same stuff that banknotes are made from), both are extremely strong and durable but pretty expensive.

If you go for ordinary cartridge paper be aware that it isn't the easiest stuff to handle in large sheets and is very prone to tearing and creasing if you're not careful .

 A lot depends on the level of quality you want to go for. If you just want a disposable stage prop then you could just cut a few rolls of lining wallpaper to the right width. If you're actually going to produce a 15m long document it seems sensible to use something a bit more durable than ordinary paper (long rolls of paper are inherently very prone to damage).

« Last Edit: February 01, 2013, 10:52:19 pm by Narsil » Logged







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Wilhelm Smydle
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2013, 12:27:28 am »

What are you doing with the scroll, rice paper is ideal for some projects.
Often a good arts store will be able to order in all sorts of specialty items.
For a less durable option a school supply shop or walmart will have small rolls of white paper for banners.

Butcher paper or parchment paper may also work well depending on the application it's slippery on one side but works well for shoji screens if rice paper is unavailable.
I actually think it works a little better than rice paper if your doing shadow theater with candle light.
I have not found any mulberry paper to use.

As most of my paper projects are not designed for durable use price and easy of locating local materials is a big part of why I use what I use.
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Dreebus Cole
Deck Hand
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United States United States


« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2013, 02:25:46 am »

The scrolls are intended to be used and read, so the material needs to be higher quality than normal printer paper.  Several of the scrolls will be gifts, but at least two of them will be sent to publishers for review/to garner interest in my work.  The paper will also need to be able to be printed on with a commercial printer; my understanding is that vellum is notoriously hard to get certain inks to adhere to.
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53Bash
Gunner
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United States United States



« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2013, 08:13:23 pm »

Might want to look at bakers parchment, which is essentially a pre-made scroll (like a roll of tinfoil), if fairly tough, and has a rather nice texture.
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Dreebus Cole
Deck Hand
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United States United States


« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2013, 10:13:24 am »

Ooo... Good call on the parchment, I will have to give that a look.
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George Salt
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2013, 02:08:45 pm »

The scrolls are intended to be used and read, so the material needs to be higher quality than normal printer paper.  Several of the scrolls will be gifts, but at least two of them will be sent to publishers for review/to garner interest in my work.  The paper will also need to be able to be printed on with a commercial printer; my understanding is that vellum is notoriously hard to get certain inks to adhere to.

You need to define "higher quality" in this instance.  This could mean thicker and heavier weight, which might cause problems for printing.  It could also mean finer and thinner (think bible pages) which would also cause printing problems for a continous roll.

I strongly suggest talking to your printer about options.  Most commercial printers  I know (in the UK) have at least one digital print line (lith printing is getting quite rare and specialised now), and you'll need to work with the papers the printing lines can work with and that are routinely stocked (unless you want to pay custom stock).  You'll also need to find a printer who has a system for splitting/trimming a roll lengthwise and who can print to a spool and not just to cut-sheets for the bindery.

Find your printer first, or you're going to spend too long thinking about solutions to the wrong problems.
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Dreebus Cole
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2013, 05:02:36 pm »

By higher quality I just mean a paper that will not rip super easy.  I should have said more durable.
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RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
*****


« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2013, 06:16:01 pm »

Baker's parchment is sometimes coated with silicone or other non-stick material; not the best surface for ink.
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Dreebus Cole
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2013, 06:28:50 pm »

Baker's parchment is sometimes coated with silicone or other non-stick material; not the best surface for ink.
Just figured that out.  I should have known that, I cook all the time...
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53Bash
Gunner
**
United States United States



« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2013, 01:48:54 am »

Hmm, could be.  Come to think, the few times she absolutely needed cooking parchment, my mom used high quality cotton "typing paper" (that you would send a hand typed resume on, for example) and brushed it with oil.  Not sure I've ever seen the actual stuff in person.

How about a 17" x 55' roll of acid free linen textured photo paper?  http://www.redrivercatalog.com/browse/inkjetlinenrolls.htm

You could tear off the top and bottom edges to get it down to 30cm, creating deckle edge that would look a bit more "hand made scroll" like.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2013, 01:52:09 am by 53Bash » Logged
George Salt
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2013, 10:30:09 am »

How are you having this printed?  - printers really know their papers, so I would speak to them first..
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bicyclebuilder
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Netherlands Netherlands


A.K.A. Scanner Camera Builder


« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2013, 10:45:12 am »

How about the cheapest, thinest wallpaper you can find?
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Twosoc
Deck Hand
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #14 on: February 15, 2013, 06:57:59 pm »

What about lining paper? I don't know if it will be in 30m rolls, but certainly strong and printable, most wallpaper shops should sell it.
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Dreebus Cole
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #15 on: March 01, 2013, 02:32:49 am »

This project was put on hold due to a rather painful turn of events for me.  I hope to be able to be back in the right mindset to work on this scroll, and my book, in the near future.

Thank you for all the suggestions, and I will still be keeping an eye here from time to time.  I just do not wish to actually do any work on the thing until I am in a better state of mind for fear of souring it for myself with bad memories.
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steampunknarwhal
Deck Hand
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Steampunk Narwhal... what a wonderful combination!


« Reply #16 on: May 10, 2013, 11:30:45 pm »

I've seen papyrus paper in stores before. Try dragging wet tea bags across it for a little bit.
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