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Author Topic: Rusted relics  (Read 22422 times)
selectedgrub
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« Reply #100 on: November 16, 2014, 07:05:25 am »

How big is that?

Life size.
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selectedgrub
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« Reply #101 on: November 17, 2014, 06:25:39 am »


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Maets
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« Reply #102 on: November 17, 2014, 02:18:32 pm »

That is an awesome piece. Perfect setting.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #103 on: November 18, 2014, 05:09:58 am »




 seriously groovy!
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #104 on: November 18, 2014, 05:16:44 am »

Mr Grub,

 In  your travels have you stumbled across any  wrought iron of a Maori design motif.  I was giving this some consideration today and all I could find on the net were these 2 examples. While they are both fabulous  I had hoped there would be more.







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selectedgrub
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« Reply #105 on: November 19, 2014, 07:35:12 am »

I'll go through some photos.
It's ringing a bell Annie but one of the Maori churches maybe???.

I pulled some from google using "Koru iron gate"

That is an awesome piece. Perfect setting.

Thanks man.

seriously groovy!

Thanks heaps.
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selectedgrub
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« Reply #106 on: November 23, 2014, 12:18:22 am »





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von Corax
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« Reply #107 on: November 23, 2014, 04:04:19 am »

For you.  Wink




(A bit late, but…)
Not an abandoned relic. The surrounding grass has obviously been grazed, and the grass underneath is the same length as that surrounding; thus this trailer has been placed here within a few weeks of the photograph.
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selectedgrub
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« Reply #108 on: November 23, 2014, 04:19:30 am »

Are you kidding me?
You've already ****** my soap dish holder thread.
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jonb
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« Reply #109 on: November 23, 2014, 05:13:19 am »



(A bit late, but…)
Not an abandoned relic. The surrounding grass has obviously been grazed, and the grass underneath is the same length as that surrounding; thus this trailer has been placed here within a few weeks of the photograph.

You know less about grass than you think.
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von Corax
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« Reply #110 on: November 23, 2014, 08:15:56 am »



(A bit late, but…)
Not an abandoned relic. The surrounding grass has obviously been grazed, and the grass underneath is the same length as that surrounding; thus this trailer has been placed here within a few weeks of the photograph.

You know less about grass than you think.

It also hasn't been there long enough to shade out the grass underneath, there's dried grass wrapped around the suspension, and there are no tops sticking out from anywhere under the trailer (there are a few tops visible just beyond the rear corner of it); these details and a hundred others too subtle to identify tell me this trailer gets moved regularly. Is that what you had in mind, jonb, or was there something else?

(We now attempt to return you to regular programming.)
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von Corax
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« Reply #111 on: November 23, 2014, 08:19:16 am »

Are you kidding me?
You've already ****** my soap dish holder thread.


Sorry 'bout that, but my first thought on seeing the soap dish really was, "Sea food! Looks tasty!"

I didn't mean to kill the thread; maybe some info on the dish and the build might revitalize it?
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von Corax
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« Reply #112 on: November 23, 2014, 08:26:31 am »







The more I look at these, the more I like them.

They're also the sort of pic that makes me wish I could see a wider angle. The second is obviously the hub of an all-metal wagon wheel of the sort used on binders and other farm implements, but I may lose sleep wondering what a "33-RB" is. Wink
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jonb
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« Reply #113 on: November 23, 2014, 11:27:19 am »

How does grass grow?
Is the length of grass dictated to by conditions or the species?  In most species of grass the blade will grow to a given length. Conditions; how well or badly the the grass is growing will dictate how many leaves a given plant will produce. As the picture is taken at a low angle there is actually no information in it that could tell you how well or badly the grass is doing in a given section of the view compared to others. What are the species of grass present? from this picture alone we cannot tell, so we do not even know if the mix is predominantly made up of annuals, or more permanent species as such is the length or grass in the image at full hight or the hight you would expect of the time of year it was taken?
Do we know from that picture if the green is even predominantly grass or could sedge be present?
We do not know if animals are grazing this grass, or what species they might be, for instance if rabbits are present they might actually have a preference to graze under the object as it would offer some protection.
Without knowing how uneven the ground is we cant even tell if the tyres are flat or inflated. Given that what hight is the grass at any given point?
Even if we could tell if the tyres were inflated or not, industrial tyres can remain inflated for years without attention.

Because of the above, a statement like;
Quote
thus this trailer has been placed here within a few weeks of the photograph.
seems unjustifiable.
I do not know if I am programmed to point this out, but I admit that I can take delight in popping pomposity.
 
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Wormster
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« Reply #114 on: November 23, 2014, 12:04:00 pm »

I do not know if I am programmed to point this out, but I admit that I can take delight in popping pomposity.

Jeez! pity the poor farmer that left his trailer in the sheep field for a few days and came back to your essay- the grass is short because the fooking sheep nibble it - Its New Zealand fregawd's sake all the have is sheep and bloddy clouds (sorry Grub!)

As for the RB 33 photo, probably some casting off some Ruston-Bucyrus  plant!

Lovin the Maori work there, anymore floating about??
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« Reply #115 on: November 23, 2014, 12:33:10 pm »

This ol' grass aside, bluegrass, grass, weed, grass up....  Tongue

Keep 'em coming Mr Grub, Grassy-arse.........grazie Wink
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von Corax
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« Reply #116 on: November 23, 2014, 12:40:24 pm »

How does grass grow?
Is the length of grass dictated to by conditions or the species?  In most species of grass the blade will grow to a given length. Conditions; how well or badly the the grass is growing will dictate how many leaves a given plant will produce. As the picture is taken at a low angle there is actually no information in it that could tell you how well or badly the grass is doing in a given section of the view compared to others. What are the species of grass present? from this picture alone we cannot tell, so we do not even know if the mix is predominantly made up of annuals, or more permanent species as such is the length or grass in the image at full hight or the hight you would expect of the time of year it was taken?
Do we know from that picture if the green is even predominantly grass or could sedge be present?
We do not know if animals are grazing this grass, or what species they might be, for instance if rabbits are present they might actually have a preference to graze under the object as it would offer some protection.
Without knowing how uneven the ground is we cant even tell if the tyres are flat or inflated. Given that what hight is the grass at any given point?
Even if we could tell if the tyres were inflated or not, industrial tyres can remain inflated for years without attention.

Because of the above, a statement like;
Quote
thus this trailer has been placed here within a few weeks of the photograph.
seems unjustifiable.
I do not know if I am programmed to point this out, but I admit that I can take delight in popping pomposity.
 

I may not know as much about grass as I think, but I'm sure I know more about grass than you think, and based on some 40-odd years' empirical study, I'd say that field is grazed regularly by either sheep or cattle. It's been fenced for livestock (again, based on 30-odd years experience in fencing.) I can see that the ground surface has not been smoothed, but that it has no more than 10 cm or so of unevenness and no visible rock, so it's been in pasture for some time. The leaves are all relatively short and uniformly bright green, indicating that they're young leaves, but they are not of uniform size or length, meaning they have not been mown to that length. The state of the tree foliage suggests very late spring or early summer, by which time nearly all pasture grasses will have begun growing the upright seed stem which rises prominently above the leaf rosette. (How do I know these grasses do so? Look behind the near tire, below the rear edge of the trailer body, and you see the tall dead stems of last year's growth above a number of small tussocks between the trailer and the fence. These clumps are typical of those which grow over livestock droppings; cattle or sheep will not graze over their own droppings for two or three years afterwards.) The fact that such dead stems are not found growing from under the tires or tongue (where cattle won't bother to dig, when there's more succulent growth mere centimetres away) means that the trailer was not there last summer, and the absence of new stems suggests that the spot where the trailer sits has been grazed sometime this season as well. (Sedge, AFAIK, also grow tall flower stems, and follow roughly the same growth schedule as grasses.) I do see what appear to be a number of stalks draped over the front of the bed, but can't tell whether they grew there or rode there from the trailer's previous spot.

I admit that my observation is merely personal opinion, but it is opinion informed by experience. Your penchant for pomposity-popping is perfectly praiseworthy, but please verify your victim before venting vitriol. Wink

Again, I apologize to Mr. Grub for this divergence from the defined direction of discourse.
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jonb
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« Reply #117 on: November 23, 2014, 12:55:22 pm »

Rabbits in New Zealand.
http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/rabbits/page-1

From a photograph of a rusted relic which appears to be on a downward slope on rough ground we are told things can be precisely placed to within centimetres. No.

Furthermore this thread is Rusted relics not abandoned relics, so what is the point of your original post if it is not to try some way of derailing the thread?
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selectedgrub
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« Reply #118 on: November 23, 2014, 06:01:56 pm »

+1


As for the RB 33 photo, probably some casting off some Ruston-Bucyrus  plant!

Lovin the Maori work there, anymore floating about??

You're quite right.
Excavator.

I only have a lot of carving pictures like these.







Maori did not work metal so there's no rust but some of them are quite old.
Just hoping no one will come and rant about dating wood now.






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von Corax
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« Reply #119 on: November 23, 2014, 09:19:41 pm »

Again I apologize for allowing myself to be baited.

Just hoping no one will come and rant about dating wood now.

I fear I have no knowledge of dendrochronology, Wink so I'll merely observe that the mind boggles at the time and effort which must have gone into those carvings.

Can you tell me whether the red gable in the last pic has been painted, or is that the natural colour of the wood?
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #120 on: November 23, 2014, 09:42:10 pm »

I do not know if I am programmed to point this out, but I admit that I can take delight in popping pomposity.

Jeez! pity the poor farmer that left his trailer in the sheep field for a few days and came back to your essay- the grass is short because the fooking sheep nibble it - Its New Zealand fregawd's sake all the have is sheep and bloddy clouds (sorry Grub!)

As for the RB 33 photo, probably some casting off some Ruston-Bucyrus  plant!

Lovin the Maori work there, anymore floating about??

All they have is sheep !!!!!!! What ever do you mean

 Baaa hhaaaaa ahaaaaa
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thezombiekat
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« Reply #121 on: November 24, 2014, 12:36:21 am »

+1


As for the RB 33 photo, probably some casting off some Ruston-Bucyrus  plant!

Lovin the Maori work there, anymore floating about??

You're quite right.
Excavator.

I only have a lot of carving pictures like these.







Maori did not work metal so there's no rust but some of them are quite old.
Just hoping no one will come and rant about dating wood now.







That is beautiful work. I can't help but wonder what tools would be used to make it. Everything comparable I have seen was made with iron chisles. 
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selectedgrub
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« Reply #122 on: November 24, 2014, 05:54:52 am »



Not my photo

Greenstone was common tooling.
Modern carver now use chainsaw then grinders finished with chisels and mallets.


Can you tell me whether the red gable in the last pic has been painted, or is that the natural colour of the wood?


That's an old meeting house
Been reapplied over time as it fades
Native bark fibres soaked, tannins mixed with ash then dried.



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selectedgrub
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« Reply #123 on: December 06, 2014, 09:41:32 pm »

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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #124 on: December 06, 2014, 11:22:59 pm »

+1


As for the RB 33 photo, probably some casting off some Ruston-Bucyrus  plant!

Lovin the Maori work there, anymore floating about??

You're quite right.
Excavator.

I only have a lot of carving pictures like these.







Maori did not work metal so there's no rust but some of them are quite old.
Just hoping no one will come and rant about dating wood now.








 Some of the Pinus Radiata  work does look a little new Wink
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