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Author Topic: Help: repairing glass  (Read 993 times)
Adelaide Blake
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« on: November 16, 2012, 09:12:27 pm »

I have a glass dip pen, and today it split very neatly in two. I need to put the two parts back together, and as far as I can describe, it's a ball and socket kind of thing, but with a small area of contact. If anyone could give me advice on how to do this I would be ever so appreciative, bearing in mind I am a humble student and can't afford anything extravagant. Thanks in advance
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Ravenson
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« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2012, 09:38:43 pm »

Start by posting a picture if you can.   If the glass broke you are going to have a hard time fixing it so it works if it is the type of pen I am thinking of.

JJ
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Adelaide Blake
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« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2012, 10:02:05 pm »




I hope these photos work...my internet certainly doesn't. Anyway, it's a break in the stem of the pen, not the nib, I can still write with it now, it's just a bit short, like a worn down pencil. I have never repaired glass items before, being more of a wood or fabric sort of person, so I don't know what to use to get the stem back in one piece


**EDIT by Mod (Siliconous Skumins) to correct URLs for pictures.   Smiley   **
« Last Edit: November 17, 2012, 12:41:10 am by Siliconous Skumins » Logged
George Salt
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« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2012, 01:02:31 am »

I'd try a slow-curing epoxy.. comes as two tubes, squirt out equal amounts, mix thoroughly and apply with the supplied mini spatula.  You can pick it up from B&Q/Homebase/etc, Tescos as well I imagine but they may only have the rapid curing (5 minute) which isn't as strong.  the key will be holding the pieces very steady whilst the epoxy cures.
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Adelaide Blake
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« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2012, 01:18:01 am »

Thanks Smiley I shall try that and see what happens

And thank for correctingnthe pictures proof I shouldn't try and do so many things at once on such a bad connection I think
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Siliconous Skumins
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« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2012, 01:20:23 am »

Hope you don't mind, but I adjusted your links to the pictures in your post - I figured it was easier than explaining how to use images hosted on flickr and you editing your links...  Smiley  You have to select a picture size, and use that link which ends with ".jpg" to get pictures to work. Flickr is a bit fiddly as an image host.  Wink


Anyhow, I see that the contact area is quite small, and it looks like it was a seam between two different glass segments. A few ideas come to mind:

Super glue should work for this, but may leave white marks / glue blobs. And you would need the stronger stuff used for glass - the household stuff is a weakend version to ensure you don't stick your fingers together...

You could also use a clear epoxy two part glue, that will give good results, and the dried glue will be similar in looks to glass. Again, there are versions which work better with glass, though most work fine.

Finally, if you want to repair the glass with glass - but don't fancy your luck with glassblowing, there is an old technique to repair glass items:  Water Glass!

Water glass is an old name for Sodium Silicate, to make it you need :
    6 g silica gel beads (silica gel packs from shoes and electronics packaging)

    8 g sodium hydroxide (drain cleaner - use gloves / eye protection)

    10 ml water

Heat to dissolve everything together, then use a dropper to apply a small amount to one end of the pen, then connect the two together. You will need to support the pen as straight as possible for around 24hrs as it dries. This will form a layer of Silica glass to form a join between the two sides. If you make a mistake, or the pen moves during the night, you can simply use hot water to dissolve the Sodium Silicate and start again.  Smiley

Video of the process:

Make Sodium Silicate


SS
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Ravenson
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« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2012, 02:36:33 am »

Those pictures work great.  for that type of Break I would use the super glue they use to put your rear view mirror on you car windshield.  It is made for gluing to glass and you should be able to find it at an auto parts store.  Just so you know gluing glass is tricky.

Jeff
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Wilhelm Smydle
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« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2012, 05:34:06 pm »

Do you know who made it?
 The original artist has the tools, skill and experiance to do the job right.
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Adelaide Blake
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« Reply #8 on: November 17, 2012, 06:24:51 pm »

It was a gift many years ago, from thailand, so I can't go back to the original artist. I'm going to try water glass, because I already have everything in the house, thanks for your help everyone Cheesy
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Hez
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« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2012, 11:07:32 pm »

Do, please, show us the results.
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