The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 23, 2017, 10:49:44 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Hard Copy or Kindle?  (Read 2787 times)
5paz
Gunner
**
United States United States


« on: October 17, 2012, 11:43:46 pm »

I got into a discussion yesterday while waiting to get my tattoo finished about which is better: a Hard Copy or Books on a Kindle/Nook.

While I love the feel of having a book in my hand I find myself leaning towards my ipad with kindle app. The reason is I don't have much room where I live to store books and it is easier to carry around. But even with these reasons I still want hard copy books.

So what is your take on this?
Logged
TimeTinker
Rogue Ætherlord
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Steampunk Facilitator MVSS


WWW
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2012, 12:48:40 am »

You may find the following thread interesting:

http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,36706.0.html

it's been quiet for about 8 weeks but might be worth a bit of minor thread necromancy.
Logged

BE SPLENDID!
Mercury Wells
Rogue Ætherlord
*
I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2012, 12:49:01 am »

Hard copy for myself...all the way. The smell of the pages, the cover artwork  & the actual sound of manualy turning of the pages. (including the age of said book/s*)
Though the same argument can be said of vinyl (or cylinder Wink ) compared to modern formats.



*unless your copy is really old &/or rare of course (then, if possible photocopy or scan it, then print yourself)
Logged

Oh...my old war wound? I got that at The Battle of Dorking. Very nasty affair that was, I can tell you.

The Ministry of Tea respectfully advises you to drink one cup of tea day...for that +5 Moral Fibre stat.
TVC15
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


Extremely hazardous...have some?


« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2012, 01:57:19 am »

I would have to agree with Wells. Next time you read Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 take note of what is implicated.
Logged

Well, it seemed like a good idea at the time...
pakled
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Minions Local 305, at your thervice!


« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2012, 04:33:37 am »

Since I don't own a real ebook reader, I'm partial to paper, but don't always have the valuta necessary for it...
Logged
Argus Fairbrass
Rogue Ætherlord
*
England England


So English even the English don't get it!


« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2012, 05:08:27 am »

I've actually just begun acquiring some of Barnes and Noble's rather attractive leather bound collection . I certainly won't get them all but some of the classics still warrant this treatment. It is rare to see these days and they sure are purdy.

I'm also quite tempted to get a staggeringly priced but wonderfully ironic BookBook cover for my Mac. So yes I guess you could say I'm definitely a hard copy kinda guy.  Cheesy
Logged

Have her steamed and brought to my tent!
Cubinoid
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Cubinoid and Tixia Loxtonian

cubinoid
WWW
« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2012, 08:48:12 am »

Whilst I understand that a kindle can probably store my entire library of books, it doesn't look half as good on the shelves, nor provide the same level of insulation.
Logged

We are proud to present the Surrey Steampunk Convivial, for your pleasure:
Shadow Of The Tower
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2012, 09:50:27 am »

Personally I think the e-book is one of the greatest things to come along in a long time.

Yes, books are wonderful but if you read as fast as I do it means that you soon find yourself the owner of literally thousands of pounds of paper that you need to organize, store and protect. I have lost and had to leave behind hundreds of books over the years, something I plan to never have to do again thanks to e-books and audiobooks.

What about the library you say? we'll first off it doesn't always have what you want, when you want it, and second the nearest library is 56 miles away, round trip.

If a book is very special or if it is a reference book that I want in my shop I may buy a physical copy but other than that I am done with bookstores forever.
Logged

gavinfuzzy
Gunner
**
Singapore Singapore


~Till All Are gOne~


WWW
« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2012, 10:01:41 am »

Hard copy, but only for Steampunk & Transformers. Everything else I can and will settle for an electronic version. Steampunk mainly for the cover art, and the feeling of holding a real book in your hand while reading it. I'll mainly try to find the hardcover version too...

Transformers... eh, I only buy hardcopy cause I collect Transformers.  Undecided

Actually, I usually pirate a book in digital format to get a feel of it first. I'll end up buying it afterwards. That way I still have an electronic copy...
Logged
Capt. Dirigible
Rogue Ætherlord
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Shirts?.....I got plenty at 'ome.


« Reply #9 on: October 18, 2012, 11:18:31 am »

The popularity of Kindle type electronic books over regular books is to me the same feeling I got when CDs took over from vinyl albums. Yes there's the obvious advantage in storing many titles on one device compared to several shelves of books but there's something about an actual book. The cover artwork, the smell of the pages..seeing how far you have progressed and how much more there is to go. People argued that the sound quality of CDs is far superior to vinyl and less likely to get scratched or damaged but there was something wonderful about buying a new 12" album, getting it home and playing it while looking at the cover art work, reading the lyrics etc.It's just not the same with a little 5" plastic case and a tiny paper insert. It's the same with a book vs a Kindle. There is something wonderfully tactile about a book. Yes, it can get torn or damaged but if you drop and smash a Kindle you've lost your entire book collection not just the one book.

Also, like a vinyl album sleeve, books are ideal to skin up on.... Wink
Logged

I say, Joe it's jolly frightening out here.
Nonsense dear boy, you should be more like me.
But look at you! You're shaking all over!
Shaking? You silly goose! I'm just doing the Watusi
Mechanic Williams
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom

I need a bigger hammer. BIGGER! That's it...


« Reply #10 on: October 18, 2012, 11:20:17 am »

Hard copies all the way.

And here's why.

With a hard book, you drop it on the floor, and there's maybe a few scratches, but the book is whole, with no real need to replace it.

But with a Kindle, you drop it, and no only is your book gone, but so is the entire medium, which is stupidly costly if you're like me and have the hand-eye co-ordination of a dead duck.

Plus there's just something about holing a hard-copy book than tops anything a Kindle or an Ipad can offer. Also, with the amount of books I have, when the zombie-apocalypse strikes I can make myself a book fort =D
Logged

If you can't fix it with a hammer, it's an electrical problem.
Dr Fidelius
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


Professor of Applied Paleontology, Miskatonic U.


« Reply #11 on: October 18, 2012, 12:22:59 pm »

Personally I think the e-book is one of the greatest things to come along in a long time.

Yes, books are wonderful but if you read as fast as I do it means that you soon find yourself the owner of literally thousands of pounds of paper that you need to organize, store and protect. I have lost and had to leave behind hundreds of books over the years, something I plan to never have to do again thanks to e-books and audiobooks.

What about the library you say? we'll first off it doesn't always have what you want, when you want it, and second the nearest library is 56 miles away, round trip.

If a book is very special or if it is a reference book that I want in my shop I may buy a physical copy but other than that I am done with bookstores forever.


Bolding mine.

You say that as if it were bug, but it is actually a feature.
Logged

The opinions expressed here are my own, and do not represent any other persons, organizations, spirits, thinking machines, hive minds or other sentient beings on this world or any adjacent dimensions in the multiverse.
Inflatable Friend
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Italy Italy



« Reply #12 on: October 18, 2012, 12:44:47 pm »

No reason why you can't have both!


There are certain authors whose work I'll always have in hardcopy. Terry Pratchett, Iain Banks, Charles Stross, Jim Butcher, books with nice covers and the array of art, anatomy, photography and related books that I'm slowly building a rather scary library of. Having shelves arrayed with the collections of these makes me smile, there's a satisfaction in having them all there looking good. But I also tended to end up with a lot of read once books that, while enjoyable, probably wern't going to get read again anytime soon. To save precious shelf space (small house and a demented hatred of double stacking shelves) and to stop he poor lady down the charity shop from rolling her eyes everytime I dragged a box of books down (then promptly took another box of new ones home) I invested in the kindle.

It's great, I still get the key books I want in physical form, plus I get to fill up my kindle with vast amounts of free classical books but I also tend to buy digital copies of the hard copy books because of the sheer practicality of the kindle. Something like the Hydrogen Sonata looks wonderful on my shelf next to all the other Banks books, but lugging it around in a bag is a lot less pleasurable - Thankfully I can switch between both mediums, meaning lovely shelf pretties and a spine saved from woeful twisting.

Having a kindle doesn't mean you can't buy good books in hard form as well!
Logged
TimeTinker
Rogue Ætherlord
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Steampunk Facilitator MVSS


WWW
« Reply #13 on: October 18, 2012, 01:36:15 pm »

Just to point out that as a Kindle user if you drop your Kindle and break it you do not lose your entire collection since your books are available from your Kindle account for redownloading.  (At least this is how it worked for me...)

Also hint - don't have seperate Kindle accounts for members of the same family.  Share one and share your books automatically.
Logged
Desirae
Deck Hand
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Advertised product may not match reality


« Reply #14 on: October 18, 2012, 03:02:47 pm »

Personally, I've always been one for physical hardcopies. I read a lot, and the feel of the paper under my hands, the physical act of turning the pages, the feeling of acomplishment when one reaches the end of a a really long, really good book, and the fact that to read it requires a positive physical act (go to my bedroom, pick book from shelf, come down to living room, snuggle up in a chair with the book and a good cup of tea, and immerse myself in another world) really makes reading a book an enjoyable experience for me.
To paraphrase (and butcher the quote, sorry) Carl Sagan, "A book is a lilnk to the mind of another human being, who may be next to you, or may be on the other side of the world, hundreds of years ago." I just don't feel this with an electronic copy. I am also much the same way with regards to CDs and MP3s.

The only time that I prefer electronic versions is when travelling, when size/weight restrictions are in effect, such as when travelling long distances or just so that I have a library of tabletop or RPG rules that would be too heavy and bulky to transport were I to carry them in corporeal form. The generally lower cost of e-books and PDFs is nice too, but if I know a book is going to be good, I'll buy a hard copy to increase the satisfaction from reading it.
Logged

How do I know you're not a figment of my imagination?
Rockula
Board Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Nothing beats a good hat.


« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2012, 03:13:45 pm »

I don't do Kindle or e-books. Just a personal preference.

Then again I've had the same mobile 'phone for 10 years. It doesn't play tunes or surf the web or have 'apps' and it doesn't stay glued in my ear 24/7.

I'm sure all these modern 'appliances' are most convenient but until they invent a way to transfer beer over the aether I don't think any of them are going to appeal to me.

Oh, and yes, I still play vinyl.
 Smiley
Logged

The legs have fallen off my Victorian Lady...
Ada Thorold
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #16 on: October 18, 2012, 05:08:10 pm »

Hard copies when reading for pleasure, in particular when they are the next book in a series that I own, I like things to match! And yes, hard copies smell nice.
E-books for text books (unless they are really expensive and I think I may want to sell them on) or just to have something to read on the train, self published books on kindle are particularly good for this.

~A~
Logged
Revd_Jericho
Rogue Ætherlord
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom


AKA Arthur Foot III

karlthulhu
WWW
« Reply #17 on: October 18, 2012, 08:52:53 pm »

As a book lover and former book shop worker with a library of literally hundreds and hundreds of books I thought that the world of the eBook would never tempt me. Then I saw my friend's kindle. And then I bought one. My world changed, as did my relationship with books.
Seriously, I adore my kindle. When you read as many books as I do it is invaluable, as I just don't have room to store any more books (unless they're beautiful illustrated books/graphic novels etc, somehow I always find room for them) plus there's the bonus of not having to drag two books to work with me when I'm reaching the end of one of them.
Logged

Shadow Of The Tower
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



« Reply #18 on: October 18, 2012, 09:20:32 pm »

Quote
Seriously, I adore my kindle. When you read as many books as I do it is invaluable, as I just don't have room to store any more books

Yeah, thats all there is to it for me.  Physical books have every advantage, until you have a lot of them and don't own a huge house or ever plan on moving. I have books that have been in storage for the past ten years and have never been unpacked in all that time for lack of space yet have been drug thousands of miles from place to place anyway.

What really frustrates me is the long list of books that I read a decade ago that I no longer own or can remember the title or author to even though I can remember about half of the plot. Hopefully with electronic books this  will never happen to me again.


As for the apocalypse, first off, all my technical books are physical copies, (I just find them easier to use, and sense the become outdated relatively quickly I don't mind as much when they wear out)  and kindle/ipads/ipods/phones are so ubiquitous, relatively tough and easy to charge I don't see them ever all being lost even in a major disaster.

And they are certainly more survivable than paper books. Unless you live in a giant underground bunker chances are good that you will have to move around a lot to survive and you aren't going to be hauling more than a couple books in your backpack.

And the sheer knowledge density you can store electronically is amazing. I have all of Wikipedia stored offline in my iPod. What an amazing age when you can carry an entire encylypedia in your pocket.
Logged
TimeTinker
Rogue Ætherlord
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Steampunk Facilitator MVSS


WWW
« Reply #19 on: October 18, 2012, 09:40:34 pm »

It is however a total pain when there are books that you want to read again and wish to buy for the kindle and they aren't available - like Patrick Tilley's Amtrak Wars series for example  Angry
Logged
Major Willoughby Chase
Guest
« Reply #20 on: October 18, 2012, 09:46:31 pm »

As a book lover and former book shop worker with a library of literally hundreds and hundreds of books I thought that the world of the eBook would never tempt me. Then I saw my friend's kindle. And then I bought one. My world changed, as did my relationship with books.
Seriously, I adore my kindle. When you read as many books as I do it is invaluable, as I just don't have room to store any more books (unless they're beautiful illustrated books/graphic novels etc, somehow I always find room for them) plus there's the bonus of not having to drag two books to work with me when I'm reaching the end of one of them.

Pretty much the same, word for word, except a couple of thousand instead of hundreds.  The end of two books to work is a blessing that cannot be underestimated.

I think in the last decade, there's only one book I have consciously removed from my bookshelves. Before then, books have only come off, when being replaced with new copies.  So I still own, give or take, all of the books I have ever bought.  There are books I care about deeply, ones I will always find shelf space for, but I am now starting to replace some of the ones I'm not so in love with, with ebook versions.  Part of it is a wrench, but another part of me remembers moving 2000+ books time, after time, after time, over the years and far prefers the idea of some of my less cherished reads becoming lighter.

As for the current kindle downside of not being able to lend them out.  This isn't really a problem.  I obsess about the condition of my books and trust few people to treat them well.  So really, other than to my parents, they never go out on loan anyway.
Logged
Kieranfoy
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia


Wot's a personal text?


« Reply #21 on: October 18, 2012, 10:26:02 pm »

Well, paper books are a wonderful experience, but if you're a traveller (ESPECIALLY if you're a lightning-fast reader) the advantages of having thousands of books on one easy-to-store device cannot be overstated.

Also, you can download many, many free ebooks. Also, if you happen to love reading fanfiction (which I do) you can used a fanfic downloader to store THOSE on your ebook, giving you thousands of books... for free!
Logged

Toll the Great Bell Once!
Pull the Lever forward to engage the
Piston and Pump...

Toll the Great Bell Twice!
With push of Button fire the Engine
And spark Turbine into life...

Toll the Great Bell Thrice!
Sing Praise to the
God of All Machines!
citizen_erased
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Netherlands Netherlands


kojitmal
WWW
« Reply #22 on: October 18, 2012, 10:43:48 pm »

While I still prefer to drag physical books around, I do dislike how I can`t bring the big ones with me because they just take up way too much space in my bag. Sometimes, I use my phone as a kindle though - I have the samsung galaxy note, which is big enough to be able to read comfortably on, plus it can open pdf files. The only downside is that I (as far as I know right now) can`t bookmark pages, meaning I have to look up where I left off last time, which can get quite a hassle. I also don`t like how batteries of electronics run out. Books don`t have batteries, so you can just read them ALWAYS. Plus I very much like the look of shelves filled with books. A kindle may have thousands of books on it, it just doesn`t have the same warm, fuzzy feeling all those shelves of books have. I like being able to stand in front of bookshelves and just look at all the titles and the covers (I especially like doing this at other people`s places).

I don`t know, I haven`t really picked a specific side at this moment. I can`t afford an e-reader/kindle though, while I can afford the occassional physical book, which kind of settles the matter for now.
Logged

Sometimes I vlog: www.youtube.com/realkojitmal
(I even once did a steampunk related video!)

There`s a blog too: http://kojitmal.wordpress.com
TimeTinker
Rogue Ætherlord
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Steampunk Facilitator MVSS


WWW
« Reply #23 on: October 18, 2012, 11:11:26 pm »

The Memsahib's kindle has a great little text-voice feature and can read the book to you.  Useful sometimes if you are busy.

My Kindle Fire allows me to bookmark, add notes, annotate, look up references etc.  Very user friendly.
Logged
Kieranfoy
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia


Wot's a personal text?


« Reply #24 on: October 18, 2012, 11:12:53 pm »

A regular Nook color is 141 dollars, or so. A goodly sum (especially on my stipend) but put, say, ten dollars a week aside, and you'll have it in a little more than half a year!
Logged
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.255 seconds with 16 queries.