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Author Topic: How to make a cane  (Read 1952 times)
Lord Jasper
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« on: October 13, 2012, 05:15:25 am »

What I really want to know is how to make the body of the cane (i.e. the stick) specifically, what would be the best/cheapest way to make a polished nice-looking cane?
 I already have a good idea of what I wanted to do with the head but I would be very grateful for advice.
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pressure-cooker
Gunner
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Netherlands Netherlands



« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2012, 09:16:34 am »

Buy an existing cane at the secondhand store and alter it the way you want it?
Or maybe this could help... http://www.instructables.com/id/How-To-Make-A-Custom-Fancy-Walking-Cane/

Good luck!
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Maets
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« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2012, 12:36:07 pm »

There are a number of cane threads here on BG.  Lots of possibilities.  Old canes, cue sticks, pipe of some sort, and more.  Look through the Tactile section for lots of ideas.

And welcome aboard.
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Prof Marvel
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« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2012, 04:39:28 am »

My Good Lord J -
both Maets and Monsuier Cooker offer excellent advice.

As I am both idle and have a distinct tendency to run off at the mouth ramble at the drop of a bowler, I would like to offer my perspective on the instructable:

- Personally, since I insist on a very stout stave that can do double-duty as a cludgel or fighting stick, I always choose strong, flexible straight grained shafts over "pretty wood" - ie: oak, ash, yew, etc. osage orange is a lovely choice but only if you do not ever cut across the grain.

- when affixing the handle to the shaft, I prefer to pre-drill a longish hole and secure the handle with a countersunk 1/4 lag screw, copious amounts of epoxy, and a steel ferule to reinforce the end-grain. suitable rubber tips are readily available to protect the floors.

yhs
prof marvel
« Last Edit: October 14, 2012, 08:53:48 pm by Prof Marvel » Logged

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Lord Jasper
Deck Hand
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United States United States

Timetraveling gentleman, adventurer, tophat wearer


« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2012, 05:16:59 am »

Thanks all, I think I know how I'm going to make it now; I have yet to decide the wood, I do think I'll look into this osage orange.
Also:
Personally, since I insist on a very stout stave that can do double-duty as a cludgel or fighting stick
I thought this was humorous because that was my exact thought when planning this cane.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2012, 05:37:39 am by Lord Jasper » Logged
Prof Marvel
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« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2012, 10:42:16 pm »

Thanks all, I think I know how I'm going to make it now; I have yet to decide the wood, I do think I'll look into this osage orange.


Osage Orange (aka  hedge-apple, Horse-apple, Bois d'arc, Bodark, or Bodock ) is a delightful wood, it is strong and flexible, somewhat heavy; just be aware that it can be gnarly, and you might be best off obtaining an intact branch and only debark it, leaving the existing shape and grain structure alone.

I got a beautiful 6" diameter Osage Orange log that I cut into staves to cure and make into "self" flat-bows . Every bow I made I managed to cut across the grain at some critical spot, causing the bow to crack or completely break at a later time.

Some hardwoods with straighter grain (or more forgiving) that lend themselves to canes and staffs  include oak, ash, thorn, hickory and even bamboo. I saw a stunning, remarkably narrow bamboo cane that had been reinforced with a 1/4 inch steel rod epoxied down the otherwise hollow center. I would advise against trying to take that one through the airport  Undecided

Hickory and Ash have been used for centuries as tool handles (especially shovel, axe, etc) due to their ability to bend and spring back. Hickory is used for "wiping sticks" or ramrods for muzzleloading rifles for it's strength and flexibility, and a completed wiping stick is not considered complete until it has been "tempered" by soaking is kerosene or coal oil overnight, then allowed to dry. The kerosene penetrates the wood and actually lubricates the longitudinal fibers, allowing them to slide against each other as it were and prevent undue cracking.

If you can  locate any of the so-called "iron woods" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ironwood
they are ideal for sticks of all types, but be aware that they are very tough, difficult to work, and will dull your tools rapidly.

hope this helps
yhs
prof marvel
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ramonwmq
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« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2012, 10:11:06 am »

My Good Lord J -
both Maets and Monsuier Cooker offer excellent advice.


Well Sir Marvel, Miss Pressure-cooker  Wink (no worries, made the same mistake once) and Maets offer indeed excellent advice. I`m also thinking of making a cane once i Finish my goggles (and my daughters). So this is a nice way to start.
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« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2012, 11:04:06 pm »

Rattan, wax wood, walnut, pecan also have a lot oc character.
I made a few several years ago useing lighter woods.
Adding a piece of metal at the foot adds strength.
I used brass pipe fittings that I reshaped a bit and used an interference fit.
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Prof Marvel
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learn from history, or be doomed to repeat it


« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2012, 03:59:50 am »

My Good Lord J -
both Maets and Monsuier Cooker offer excellent advice.


Well Sir Marvel, Miss Pressure-cooker  Wink (no worries, made the same mistake once)

Ahhhhhhhhh
oops
My apologies to the Fair Ms Pressure-cooker

yhs
prof marvel
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