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Author Topic: a random fleeting thought that i managed to lay hold of......  (Read 1838 times)
Bobby_Brazil
Gunner
**
Brazil Brazil

steamed up


« on: September 16, 2007, 07:46:28 pm »

ok a new thread on an old subject, my velocipede project. my interests are varied as are my hobbies. instead of painting my chome black as most of it is worn through anyway, i think i shall sand blast it then polish it, and blue all of the nuts,bolts, springs, gooseneck etc. i have done it to a machete and it came out well
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Listen for the unsaid, while believing the unseen
Sir Ratchetspanner
Officer
***
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2007, 07:49:03 pm »

Is it chrome plated brass, or steel?

Chrome plated brass looks great when you sand it down, leaving some of the pitting from the corrosion, and exposing some tiny hints of brass. The overall look is a dull grey with a strange gold tint at certain angles.. then when you get close you can see all of the detail.
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Bobby_Brazil
Gunner
**
Brazil Brazil

steamed up


« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2007, 07:58:49 pm »

most of all it is steel, i was going to actually ruin my good chrome to expose the brass underneath. for the headlight and taillight i am going to modify a battery powered torch that uses a obsolete batteryt that is hard to find, the light is not with a bulb but a fuse looking thing like the inside of a light bulb, the lense is held in place by a spring steel band that while is circular it is composed of triangular pieces. the funny thing is these lamps can be had for less tha $5 at swap meets, i paid 50 cents for mine.
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Markus Stratus
Gunner
**
United States United States


Jack-of-All-Trades by this point


WWW
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2007, 05:01:49 am »

How are you going to blue them? with the blue heat treatment where you heat it 'till it's blue or with the rust blue treatment where you use some chemicals and alot of patience and scrubbing? if it's the latter tell me how you get them to go blue, because so far I only know how to do brown and black.

Cheerio,
Markus
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As Above, So below.

Sir Ratchetspanner
Officer
***
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2007, 05:18:38 am »

If you want to use the heat treatment method, be warned that it can make the metal brittle. Dont even think about trying it on the springs.

As for the chemical method.. allow me to consult an old tome. "Enginnering Workshop Data" Caxton press, 1936.

"One recommended chemical method is to brush or sponge over the previously polished surface of the steel with a solution consisting of 2 parts of crystallised chloride of iron, 2 parts solid chloride of antimony, and 1 part of gallic acid in 4-5 parts of water. Allow the parts to dry in the air. This operation should be repeated two or three times. Afterwards wash well in water, dry, and rub with boiled linseed oil to deepen the shade."

There is also a method given for a black coating:

"If the steel articles are first heated, then dipped in engine lubricating oil and then heated in an oven for 5-10 minutes at 150-180 degrees C, a good adherant black skin is formed on the surface"

There is a method given for a rainbow appearance on steel as well.. But I shall not quote it, as it blithely instructs you to use molten cynide.
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Smaggers
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United Kingdom United Kingdom


You cannot mesmerize me...I'm British!


WWW
« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2007, 01:39:35 pm »

Quote
"If the steel articles are first heated, then dipped in engine lubricating oil and then heated in an oven for 5-10 minutes at 150-180 degrees C, a good adherant black skin is formed on the surface"


This may have a low PAF* rating.  The smell may haveg around for a good long time.





*Partner Acceptance Factor.
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"I should probably finish one project before taking on another, but the badger won't fit in the freezer." -Steamblast Mary

http://smaggers.deviantart.com/
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Bobby_Brazil
Gunner
**
Brazil Brazil

steamed up


« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2007, 02:03:53 pm »

the stuff that i had used previously i bought about two years ago at a gun shop, it can in a tube, without looking up the tube and if memory serves, rub it in/on after an interval, rinse or wipe off, the above mentioned machette has held up admirably, i think the secret is having the pieces clean, clean, clean.
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Great Bizarro
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2007, 05:17:15 pm »

Best bet is to have it black chromed. It is a process where you remove the existing chrome plate with an acid down to the nickel then use a solution and a power source to deposit black chrome on it.
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"No matter where you go, there you are"
Bobby_Brazil
Gunner
**
Brazil Brazil

steamed up


« Reply #8 on: September 18, 2007, 02:03:58 pm »

Best bet is to have it black chromed. It is a process where you remove the existing chrome plate with an acid down to the nickel then use a solution and a power source to deposit black chrome on it.
that's a neat idea i'd not thought off
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sidecar_jon
Snr. Officer
****


« Reply #9 on: September 18, 2007, 08:05:05 pm »

the stuff that i had used previously i bought about two years ago at a gun shop, it can in a tube, without looking up the tube and if memory serves, rub it in/on after an interval, rinse or wipe off, the above mentioned machette has held up admirably, i think the secret is having the pieces clean, clean, clean.


some ive seen years ago was called.."cold black" or something similar

ah yes here it is! http://caswelleurope.co.uk/coldox.htm
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