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Poll
Question: Do you have a "dream home," steamy or otherwise?
A classic Victorian house.
"Retro-modern" house.
Old Gothic church.
Remote cabin.
Old farmhouse.
A liveaboard boat.
An underground or cave house.
A castle/palace.
A small studio apartment.
An RV so I can travel to more SP cons.
An airship.
Gypsy wagon.
A tent.
A craftsman style house.
A tower (silo, windmill, lighthouse, ATC, etc...)
I have no dreams.
Microhome.  3/26/16

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Author Topic: POLL: Your (SP) Dream Home?  (Read 60721 times)
Zeppelin Kapitan Fritz
Zeppelin Admiral
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United States United States

Kapitän of the airborne assault carrier "Hermann"


« Reply #75 on: September 28, 2012, 04:25:24 pm »

     In Crimson Skies, there is a city in the mountains of Colorado called "Sky Haven". Basically, it's an air pirate stronghold with buildings built into the mountainsides out of zeppelin wreckage and lots of cool but impossible natural landscapes. I particularly liked the "Black Hats" HQ that appears in the mission where you have to rescue the Black Swan. I think something like that might make a cool steampunkish residence.
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Angus A Fitziron
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Research Air Ship R.A.S. 'Saorsa'


« Reply #76 on: September 28, 2012, 05:21:46 pm »

What are floor boards?  Wink
We put the pipes in the top layer of the concrete floor.


Oh you Dutch and your concrete! I was amazed when I stayed in my friend's house in Hellevoetsluis - the house seemed to be poured on site, even the zolder floor was cast concrete with a dam for the washing machine!

Still it works if you don't have much wood - have you thought of a post stressed concrete bicycle yet?

 Cool
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Birdnest
Zeppelin Admiral
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United States United States



WWW
« Reply #77 on: September 28, 2012, 06:02:29 pm »

The nice thing about wood is that it grows on trees.  It does help to be where the trees are though.
I'm not opposed to concrete, but personally prefer stone and brick (and if constructed properly, can be reinforced like concrete to some extent).  I think it's fine for a substructure for a root cellar or basement.

A lot can be done with an old structure like a gothic church of old ... towers and caves too.
Adding a geothermal hydronic system on the existing floor. You can use a variety of fuels for the boiler ... even a spiffy smokestack. (our shop has floor heat powered by geothermal, propane and wood).
Adding solar powered fans with belts, gears and pulleys.
There's lots of options that will enhance the historical character without hurting it.

The trick with tall buildings is airflow ... fans, convection, etc. 
My first choice for heating is always going to be hydronic floor heating in that the heat is at your feet - I even at lower temp settings think it feels warmer.  Some well placed fans will distribute the heat into the stone for that good 'ol thermal mass.  Wood flooring (or similar temperature sensitive materials) simply needs to 'float' with space to expand / contract.
We currently heat ours with a single wood stove ... from Norway!  We can't afford the infloor heat addition yet.

The small remote cabin, from personal experience, is super efficient (because it's small) - it is a lifestyle choice though to be OK with limited space.  You can be quite extravagant when there's so little to buy.  Floor coverings or wall coverings can be upgraded to anything of your choice.
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Captain
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United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


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« Reply #78 on: September 28, 2012, 06:30:15 pm »

What are floor boards?  Wink
We put the pipes in the top layer of the concrete floor.



Oh you Dutch and your concrete! I was amazed when I stayed in my friend's house in Hellevoetsluis - the house seemed to be poured on site, even the zolder floor was cast concrete with a dam for the washing machine!

Still it works if you don't have much wood - have you thought of a post stressed concrete bicycle yet?

 Cool


Are you all familiar with Thomas Edison's concrete houses?  Apparently after his inventions improved the cement making industry he made cast iron(?) house mold sets for rapids home construction.  Some of these homes are still in use in New Jersey.

I am a bit of a fan of the rising technology of "3-D Printing" also known as rapid prototyping and rapid manufacturing.  http://www.gizmag.com/d-shape-3d-printer/21594/   If we are careful not to reinvent any of Edison's concrete house problems this could be great.  Basically anything that you can draft on a computer could be "printed" in about a day.  They are currently developing quick drying concretes and a sort of sand/epoxy mixture both of which are supposed to be very strong and cheap.  Since this technology is not limited to straight lines and squared corners these new houses might look just a little Lovecraftian
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-Karl
SeVeNeVeS
Immortal
**
England England



« Reply #79 on: September 28, 2012, 07:10:40 pm »


In the UK that is called underfloor heating. The problem with using this kind of system with suspended (wooden) floors is that wood is rubbish when it comes to efficient heat transfer.

The best way is at least 50mmm, idealy 100mmm insulation under the pipework, concrete on top then ceramic tiles. (I believe its called thermal coefficient of materials or something).

Great on new builds but very difficult to install in an existing dwelling without major upheaval.

~SeVeN~
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bicyclebuilder
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Netherlands Netherlands


A.K.A. Scanner Camera Builder


« Reply #80 on: September 28, 2012, 07:17:54 pm »

What are floor boards?  Wink
We put the pipes in the top layer of the concrete floor.


Oh you Dutch and your concrete! I was amazed when I stayed in my friend's house in Hellevoetsluis - the house seemed to be poured on site, even the zolder floor was cast concrete with a dam for the washing machine!

Still it works if you don't have much wood - have you thought of a post stressed concrete bicycle yet?

 Cool

We don't have much wood. When we do have wood, we would like to use it to the fullest. (no pun inteded)

A concrete bicycle? I think it's do-able. What I'm actually pondering on is a rebar bicycle. With the eiffeltower structure as an influence. Perhaps the bicycle after that can be a concrete one. Who knows.
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The best way to learn is by personal experience.
Captain
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


WWW
« Reply #81 on: September 28, 2012, 07:57:14 pm »

In the UK that is called underfloor heating. The problem with using this kind of system with suspended (wooden) floors is that wood is rubbish when it comes to efficient heat transfer.

The best way is at least 50mmm, idealy 100mmm insulation under the pipework, concrete on top then ceramic tiles. (I believe its called thermal coefficient of materials or something).

Great on new builds but very difficult to install in an existing dwelling without major upheaval.

~SeVeN~


The plumbers who were installing my infloor heat warned me that wood floors, especially carpeted floors like mine, were not going to work well.  My cabin had more than a crawl space and less than a basement in which they spent many hours running PEX pipe and I spent many more hours wiring insulation under it.  It turned out that wood did not have to be a good insulator since the heat HAD to go somewhere and preferred to go up.  We just could not have asked for it to work better.

Funny story though - I installed two long life bronze return pumps, one for each zone, mounted to post set in the floor.  When we first turned the heat on NOTHING seemed to happen at all because they were so quiet. I added a board from the pump post to the floor boards just so that if I listened very carefully I could be reassured that it was working like noisier heaters.   Wink  A retired rodeo clown who had run out of bones to break and started a (very good) BBQ joint bought the cabin when we moved.  He admitted to first removing the "noise" board then replacing it for the same reason. 

In hind sight I wish that we had run coils of PEX pipe from both zones under the bathroom since a bathtub and bathroom floor can never be too warm.  I also installed a separate hot water heater for the infloor heat since I imagined the returning water being ice cold after going all through the system but it actually came back scalding hot.  I hear that other people run their infloor heat and house hot water off just one heater which now makes sense.  I think that I would have also run the coils around the fireplace base since the stone can radiate heat and, if the fire is lit, reclaim a little. 


This is NOT the cabin but a very similar one in the same county.  Not quite a dream home but I wish that I could have packed it up and brought it to Alaska with us.  It was very comfortable and quiet. 
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Shadow Of The Tower
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



« Reply #82 on: September 30, 2012, 10:38:40 am »

Quote
This is NOT the cabin but a very similar one in the same county.  Not quite a dream home but I wish that I could have packed it up and brought it to Alaska with us.  It was very comfortable and quiet.


When I designed the Tower I was living in a 12'x12' (3.6mx3.6m) wood framed cabin in Fairbanks Alaska. Rent was $350 a month and it cost me five dollars a day to heat in the winter AND I couldn't get the temperature above 60ºF if it was below -20º outside, which being Fairbanks was about four months out of the year.

It taught me four things...walls should never be thinner than 12'' ,windows should never cover more than 10% of your walls,I can live just fine in a small space, and a years rent costs as much as it does to build something that size.

Using those lessons I resolved to never build a house using standard construction, or one so big that I can't afford to build it without going into debt.

My current home in the tower is till tiny by american standards, less than 800 square feet, but compared to the 144 feet where myself AND my girlfriend lived for TWO years, its huge and I have 0 debt.

The Alaskan cabin, mine was is the one in the foreground.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2012, 10:41:30 am by Shadow Of The Tower » Logged

ramonwmq
Gunner
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Netherlands Netherlands


My real name :) Eoghan Waldive Summerquill

ramonwmq
WWW
« Reply #83 on: October 01, 2012, 10:17:58 am »

Nulland Shaft,

I always wanted to live in this building:


It`s a building for the Dutch coal mines located in Kerkrade the Netherlands.

I mean...having this in your home would be epic!


Not to mention the old steam engines.

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Angus A Fitziron
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Research Air Ship R.A.S. 'Saorsa'


« Reply #84 on: October 01, 2012, 10:29:38 am »

Nulland Shaft,

I always wanted to live in this building:



Yup! that's a win!



Not to mention the old steam engines.



There are steam engines as well?Huh?
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ramonwmq
Gunner
**
Netherlands Netherlands


My real name :) Eoghan Waldive Summerquill

ramonwmq
WWW
« Reply #85 on: October 01, 2012, 10:45:12 am »

Well Sir Angus A Fitzirion, there used to be, I don`t know how many survived.

Here`s a link to a photoalbum of that building (Schacht Nulland). But it`s a Dutch site. You can click the thumbnails for a bigger picture.

http://www.domanialemijn.nl/gallery/nulland.php

Those mining engines were not the smallest steam engines  Smiley

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Captain
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


WWW
« Reply #86 on: October 01, 2012, 05:20:19 pm »

Quote
This is NOT the cabin but a very similar one in the same county.  Not quite a dream home but I wish that I could have packed it up and brought it to Alaska with us.  It was very comfortable and quiet.


When I designed the Tower I was living in a 12'x12' (3.6mx3.6m) wood framed cabin in Fairbanks Alaska. Rent was $350 a month and it cost me five dollars a day to heat in the winter AND I couldn't get the temperature above 60ºF if it was below -20º outside, which being Fairbanks was about four months out of the year.

It taught me four things...walls should never be thinner than 12'' ,windows should never cover more than 10% of your walls,I can live just fine in a small space, and a years rent costs as much as it does to build something that size.

Using those lessons I resolved to never build a house using standard construction, or one so big that I can't afford to build it without going into debt.

My current home in the tower is till tiny by American standards, less than 800 square feet, but compared to the 144 feet where myself AND my girlfriend lived for TWO years, its huge and I have 0 debt.

The Alaskan cabin, mine was is the one in the foreground.



By some odd coincidence I am looking to possibly move to Fairbanks this winter and noticed a number of similar cabins for sale and rent: http://fairbanks.craigslist.org/apa/   Fortunately we know a number of people in the fencing, SCA, & SP communities there who have been trying to steer me away from such cabins.  The visual helps a lot though.  I have stayed in a tent at -64F near there but I am longer in the tooth now. 
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Captain
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


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« Reply #87 on: October 01, 2012, 07:06:29 pm »

I just found out that there are a number of old light houses available:  http://www.nps.gov/history/maritime/nhlpa/noas2012.htm

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von Corax
Squire of the Lambda Calculus
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
Canada Canada

Prof. Darwin Prætorius von Corax


« Reply #88 on: October 02, 2012, 01:29:49 am »

Well Sir Angus A Fitzirion, there used to be, I don`t know how many survived.

Here`s a link to a photoalbum of that building (Schacht Nulland). But it`s a Dutch site. You can click the thumbnails for a bigger picture.

http://www.domanialemijn.nl/gallery/nulland.php

Those mining engines were not the smallest steam engines  Smiley




Oooh— A tower, old steam engines and it comes with its own underground lair as well! WIN!
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The Leverkusen Institute of Paleocybernetics is 5838 km from Reading
Esper Ranger
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


Imagineering Done Right!


« Reply #89 on: October 02, 2012, 11:50:50 pm »


In the UK that is called underfloor heating. The problem with using this kind of system with suspended (wooden) floors is that wood is rubbish when it comes to efficient heat transfer.

The best way is at least 50mmm, idealy 100mmm insulation under the pipework, concrete on top then ceramic tiles. (I believe its called thermal coefficient of materials or something).

Great on new builds but very difficult to install in an existing dwelling without major upheaval.

~SeVeN~


When I lived in Japan, where the houses seemingly have little to no insulation, we simply had electric "hot carpets" on the floor. They worked fantastic for me and my wife. Even better when combined with a kotatsu (an electric heater on the underside of of a low table covered in a thick quilt. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kotatsu We brought these back over to Kentucky with us and instead of heating an entire house we just sit warm in the living room to watch TV until it is time to crawl into bed with an electric blanket.
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CaptainMurra
Gunner
**
Australia Australia


why hello there!


« Reply #90 on: October 04, 2012, 05:17:30 am »



Gypsy houseboat caravan thing...... that would be the life. Of course i would travel by myself. that would be the best. however money is an issue.... i'll wait till i'm filthy rich! Cheesy

i'll buy something like this:

and a cute little horse, and we'll travel everywhere! over the horizons and awayyyyyy.

now imagine that..... BUT ON A BOAT D: too much epicness....

(i do like the caravan idea!)
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CaptainMurra
Gunner
**
Australia Australia


why hello there!


« Reply #91 on: October 04, 2012, 05:19:39 am »

Nulland Shaft,

I always wanted to live in this building:


It`s a building for the Dutch coal mines located in Kerkrade the Netherlands.

I mean...having this in your home would be epic!



that top part..... it could be a slide from your lookout point (the tower) to your bedroom...
invite me over when you finish it!
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Sir Henry
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Poking the i's and drinking the t's


« Reply #92 on: October 04, 2012, 08:21:10 am »

*snip*
now imagine that..... BUT ON A BOAT D: too much epicness....

(i do like the caravan idea!)
I did (imagine that) several years ago and it all seemed financially viable and would have happened were it not for Lady Henry's rheumatics that make living near water impossible. Cry

The trick was to use a narrowboat and travel the canals of England. Spend the week travelling and making and the weekends at canalside pubs selling what you've made. Now that was a dream home!
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ramonwmq
Gunner
**
Netherlands Netherlands


My real name :) Eoghan Waldive Summerquill

ramonwmq
WWW
« Reply #93 on: October 04, 2012, 09:38:58 am »

Nulland Shaft,

I always wanted to live in this building:


It`s a building for the Dutch coal mines located in Kerkrade the Netherlands.

I mean...having this in your home would be epic!



that top part..... it could be a slide from your lookout point (the tower) to your bedroom...
invite me over when you finish it!


Slide!! That`s a great idea, in the lookout point i would put up a telescope, so after stargazing...slide right into your bedroom  Smiley
Unfortunately this building is quite out of my league  Sad

On the other hand, you`re always welcome for a nice cup of tea Miss. CaptainMurra.
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Shadow Of The Tower
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



« Reply #94 on: October 08, 2012, 09:44:48 pm »

Quote
By some odd coincidence I am looking to possibly move to Fairbanks this winter and noticed a number of similar cabins for sale and rent: http://fairbanks.craigslist.org/apa/   Fortunately we know a number of people in the fencing, SCA, & SP communities there who have been trying to steer me away from such cabins.  The visual helps a lot though.  I have stayed in a tent at -64F near there but I am longer in the tooth now.


Don't get me wrong, I would much rather live in a cabin than any of the apartments in town, but that cabin just wasn't built as well as it should have been, and it wasn't from age, I was the first owner. It just simply didn't have thick enough walls and too many windows.

Send me a PM if you have any questions about living in Fairbanks. I spent two years there and my sister moved up after I left and is still there teaching at the university.  When I moved up I didn't know a single person in town but I found the SCA up there to be pretty helpful.  From the day I drove into town it was only ten days until I had my cabin rented and a job earning twice as much as I did in the lower 48. I loved the town, but of course, I'm weird.
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Angus A Fitziron
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Research Air Ship R.A.S. 'Saorsa'


« Reply #95 on: October 09, 2012, 10:30:49 am »

Yep, looks like one 'cool' place to live!

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Shadow Of The Tower
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



« Reply #96 on: October 09, 2012, 12:44:44 pm »

Quote
Yep, looks like one 'cool' place to live!

It cracks me up that the caption to that picture says 'only in America' since when I was in Fairbanks most people referred to the lower 48 as "the States"  and people would ask if I'm going back to 'america' for christmas. Although most people just called anything outside of Fairbanks "Outside" which also included the rest of Alaska. You quickly get the impression that not only do they not consider themselves americans but that they are the only real Alaskans. When I asked someone what it was like down in Anchorage they told me "The only good thing about Anchorage is that its only a thirty minute drive from Alaska"

Fairbanks is the only place I've lived where people consider themselves citizens of the town first, the state second and the country last. Its also the had the only city council meeting where someone threatened to hang anyone who voted for a certain bill and was met with a standing ovation. (the bill was to create a limit on the number of dead cars you can have on your property within city limits. I believe the proposed limit was 3)

The funny thing is, I hear every town in Alaska feels the same way about their own city.
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Angus A Fitziron
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*******
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Research Air Ship R.A.S. 'Saorsa'


« Reply #97 on: October 09, 2012, 12:51:30 pm »

Well, with a fair wind, we are hoping to get to Canada next year (family wedding in Toronto) and my better half has friends in Vancouver she would like to see. As she will have to retire to get the time off, I am hoping we can extend our stay and instead of going straight east west, drop down into the 'States', see a bit of Route 66 and visit Alaska. Now I know that Alaska is really in Fairbanks, I can polish up the itinary!
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Captain
Zeppelin Captain
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United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


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« Reply #98 on: October 09, 2012, 05:23:22 pm »

Lesser 48 or "Land-of-Big-Wal-Mart."  Now if you want to see an eccentric town even by Alaska standards try Haines.  http://www.seakfair.org/beer-fest/  There is a wonderful sense of community in most Alaska towns (except Anchorage.)  Back to the topic - the only Alaska town that has any number of "dream homes" IMHO is the old Russian capital, Sitka.  There are several island homes there like:



For those who like lighthouses - I hear that you can rent the Point Retreat Lighthouse near here(?)  http://www.lighthousefriends.com/light.asp?ID=827    For more on Alaska lighthouses:  http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/lighthouse/ak.htm

BTW - there is a Fairbanks SP group page at: http://www.thesteampunkempire.com/group/queensarcticexpeditionaryleague and I think that they have a FB page as well. 
« Last Edit: October 09, 2012, 05:40:22 pm by Captain » Logged
CaptainMurra
Gunner
**
Australia Australia


why hello there!


« Reply #99 on: October 12, 2012, 02:45:21 am »

Lesser 48 or "Land-of-Big-Wal-Mart."  Now if you want to see an eccentric town even by Alaska standards try Haines.  http://www.seakfair.org/beer-fest/  There is a wonderful sense of community in most Alaska towns (except Anchorage.)  Back to the topic - the only Alaska town that has any number of "dream homes" IMHO is the old Russian capital, Sitka.  There are several island homes there like:



For those who like lighthouses - I hear that you can rent the Point Retreat Lighthouse near here(?)  http://www.lighthousefriends.com/light.asp?ID=827    For more on Alaska lighthouses:  http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/lighthouse/ak.htm

BTW - there is a Fairbanks SP group page at: http://www.thesteampunkempire.com/group/queensarcticexpeditionaryleague and I think that they have a FB page as well. 


that second red and white lighthouse is ADORABLE! i would totally rent that...... if i lived in america....

but i don't. so the land down under and it's outback will have to do for me!
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