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Poll
Question: Do you have a "dream home," steamy or otherwise?
A classic Victorian house.
"Retro-modern" house.
Old Gothic church.
Remote cabin.
Old farmhouse.
A liveaboard boat.
An underground or cave house.
A castle/palace.
A small studio apartment.
An RV so I can travel to more SP cons.
An airship.
Gypsy wagon.
A tent.
A craftsman style house.
A tower (silo, windmill, lighthouse, ATC, etc...)
I have no dreams.
Microhome.  3/26/16

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Author Topic: POLL: Your (SP) Dream Home?  (Read 59115 times)
Maets
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Airship Builder


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« Reply #50 on: September 25, 2012, 03:31:16 am »

It must be one of his contraptions that allows him to listen in to your cranial Babbage engine

Shhhhhhhhhh, you'll give away all my secrets.
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Captain Lyerly
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Ukraine Ukraine


At the helm of the Frumious Bandersnatch


« Reply #51 on: September 25, 2012, 03:51:42 am »

Well, my choices are a liveaboard and a tent, neither of which are very popular at the moment. My third choice would be a tower of some sort, not an option. We have many water towers in England which would be a possibility.


For a tent, it would have to be a bell tent full of clever and luxurious campaign furniture, with a gazebo out back covering the field kitchen!



...or maybe a big bedouin tent...

As for a boat, it depends where I want to go. A narrowboat would be cool, there's a lot to see in Britain. Or maybe a cut down French peniche if I were to venture further.

Ahhh to dream!


There are other options available yet.  Check your PMs, I have given you a gift.



Chas.
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Captain Sir Charles A. Lyerly, O.B.T.
Soldier of Fortune and Gentleman Adventurer
wire: captain_lyerly, at wire office "Yahoo dot Qom"

"You'd think he'd learn."
"Heh! De best minions neffer do!"
bicyclebuilder
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Netherlands Netherlands


A.K.A. Scanner Camera Builder


« Reply #52 on: September 25, 2012, 01:05:52 pm »

  Do you happen to have any pictures of the inside? 
#SNIP#

No I haven't, sorry.

#SNIP#
Another note for Bicyclebuilder, timber frames are structurally efficient and have a very long lifespan - it's worth finding or even importing the timbers.  You can build the envelope from most anything because it does not need to be structural.  So, forest or not, timber frames don't use that much wood.

sold yet? ...  Wink

#SNIP#





Nope. Perhaps my mother told me the bedtime story about the 3 little pigs to much.  Wink

I'm a draftsman in plumbing, heating and ventilation. I've seen a lot of (to us) alternative designs. Houses made of wood, metal, brick, stone. All have their own benefits. Right now we are mostly looking into zero energy housing. Using heat pumps, solar energy, balanced central heating. With current development of insulation, we are now able to use less energy than before. The way of heating a house is connected to the use of the building materials.
When I was in Canada, I noticed that the way of heating was mainly done by air. Heated air is brought into the house. Excess air is blown outside the house, sometimes passed thru an air-to-air heat exchanger.
We also have ventilation and we also use heat exchangers, but we warm up the house with floor heating. Basically hoses in a dence pattern (about 10 to 15cm apart) with warm water running thru. These hoses warm up the concrete and warms up the rooms from the bottom up. Heat travels upwards, so everything gets heated. With proper insulation, you need minimum energy to keep the house comfortably warm.
The key requirement is that the house has concrete floors. In order to support the floors, you need brick walls. A structural inner wall and a lighter outer wall with insulation in bitween, is the usual building process.
Benefits of using concrete is that it stays warm for a long time. Ones it's heated, it takes very few energy to keep it that way. During the summer, it can also be used to cool the building.

That's all for educational, for now.  Wink
Back to the dream house topic. With the current decrease in church-goers, churches are up for sale. Most of them are monuments, so not a lot of outside alteration can be done. But inside you've got plenty of room to devide rooms into a house. Most of them are built with thick brick walls, so enough insulation. Except for the windows. Insulate them and you've got a good shell to keep the heat inside.
I have been thinking about big buildings like a factory, but due to probable spilt chemicals, I don't think this is a good idea. Abandoned trainstations might work. Technical difficulty, you don't know what flaws are hidden inside the structure, so there is a posibility the costs are going to get higher than expexted.
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Shadow Of The Tower
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



« Reply #53 on: September 25, 2012, 01:25:59 pm »

In the US there are quite a few decommissioned nuclear missile silos for sale. Many of these are large complexes with thousands of feet of tunnels and would make an ideal SP colony.

Unfortunately they are no longer being sold for the paltry sums they once where as more and more people are becoming interested in survivalist style living and since many of these people are willing to pay a fortune for such a place. It should be noted though that even paying millions for a place originally worth billions is an incredible bargain if you can somehow take advantage of it.

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Birdnest
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States



WWW
« Reply #54 on: September 25, 2012, 05:16:05 pm »

I would want to live here when its finished:







Luckily, It is where I do live. Unfortunately, I'm the only one who is going to get it finished. Servants, I need Servants!


SOTT:  I LOVE TOWERS!!  Are you going to face it in stone ... are there timbers in there ... are you weather tight yet? so many questions and not enough pictures.

as for the poll ... crap, I've already voted.  A remote Tower or Lighthouse is the perfect structure for the burgeoning mad scientist preparing to take over the world!
« Last Edit: September 25, 2012, 05:19:17 pm by Birdnest » Logged

Onward ho!
Captain
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


WWW
« Reply #55 on: September 25, 2012, 05:24:54 pm »

I do like towers.  Always wanted one as part of my house. May some day add one. Wanted one with a glass dome top so you could […] be in a thunder storm.


Damn you, Maets, get out of my head!


In the way-back-before-times I was an ATC commander in Germany and would hang out in the tower during thunderstorms.  What a view.  An old control tower could be converted into a nice home (if you don't have bad knees.)



Shadow Of The Tower - Besides these old missile silos: http://www.missilebases.com/properties I saw two more on Ebay last night. 
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-Karl
Birdnest
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States



WWW
« Reply #56 on: September 25, 2012, 05:34:38 pm »

  Do you happen to have any pictures of the inside? 
#SNIP#

No I haven't, sorry.

#SNIP#
Another note for Bicyclebuilder, timber frames are structurally efficient and have a very long lifespan - it's worth finding or even importing the timbers.  You can build the envelope from most anything because it does not need to be structural.  So, forest or not, timber frames don't use that much wood.

sold yet? ...  Wink

#SNIP#





Nope. Perhaps my mother told me the bedtime story about the 3 little pigs to much.  Wink

I'm a draftsman in plumbing, heating and ventilation. I've seen a lot of (to us) alternative designs. Houses made of wood, metal, brick, stone. All have their own benefits. Right now we are mostly looking into zero energy housing. Using heat pumps, solar energy, balanced central heating. With current development of insulation, we are now able to use less energy than before. The way of heating a house is connected to the use of the building materials.
When I was in Canada, I noticed that the way of heating was mainly done by air. Heated air is brought into the house. Excess air is blown outside the house, sometimes passed thru an air-to-air heat exchanger.
We also have ventilation and we also use heat exchangers, but we warm up the house with floor heating. Basically hoses in a dence pattern (about 10 to 15cm apart) with warm water running thru. These hoses warm up the concrete and warms up the rooms from the bottom up. Heat travels upwards, so everything gets heated. With proper insulation, you need minimum energy to keep the house comfortably warm.
The key requirement is that the house has concrete floors. In order to support the floors, you need brick walls. A structural inner wall and a lighter outer wall with insulation in bitween, is the usual building process.
Benefits of using concrete is that it stays warm for a long time. Ones it's heated, it takes very few energy to keep it that way. During the summer, it can also be used to cool the building.

That's all for educational, for now.  Wink
Back to the dream house topic. With the current decrease in church-goers, churches are up for sale. Most of them are monuments, so not a lot of outside alteration can be done. But inside you've got plenty of room to devide rooms into a house. Most of them are built with thick brick walls, so enough insulation. Except for the windows. Insulate them and you've got a good shell to keep the heat inside.
I have been thinking about big buildings like a factory, but due to probable spilt chemicals, I don't think this is a good idea. Abandoned trainstations might work. Technical difficulty, you don't know what flaws are hidden inside the structure, so there is a posibility the costs are going to get higher than expexted.


There's this cool show called "You Live in What?" ... very interesting re-uses of old factories, water towers and other unlikely structures.  I dig where what you are saying there.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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Nephele
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


MISTRESS OF NAMES


« Reply #57 on: September 25, 2012, 06:28:32 pm »

I would have a suite of rooms aboard The World.

http://aboardtheworld.com/experience

It's not exactly The Nautilus, but it's still a posh ship that's always voyaging somewhere.



-- Nephele



Kudos.  That takes "live aboard" to a new extreme.  Any idea what the cost(s) would be?


As of 2010, a 328 sq ft (30.5 m2) studio (Ocean Studio 661) has a list price of USD $600,000. Ocean Residence 1006 (2 bedroom, 2.5 bath) list price USD $2,950,000. The World Suite 1108/1110 has a list price of USD $13,500,000.
 
Monthly homeowner dues range from $20,000 per month (for the smaller units) and up, and cover fuel, crew, maintenance and a meal allowance for the owner.


Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS_The_World

And here are the floor plans for the Ocean Residence 1006:



Sweet!  

-- Nephele
« Last Edit: September 25, 2012, 06:33:23 pm by Nephele » Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #58 on: September 25, 2012, 06:40:15 pm »

A Martello tower!  Like the one Stephen Daedelus lives in, in Ulysses.  Even better if it still has the gun....
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Captain
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


WWW
« Reply #59 on: September 25, 2012, 07:14:25 pm »


As of 2010, a 328 sq ft (30.5 m2) studio (Ocean Studio 661) has a list price of USD $600,000. Ocean Residence 1006 (2 bedroom, 2.5 bath) list price USD $2,950,000. The World Suite 1108/1110 has a list price of USD $13,500,000.
 
Monthly homeowner dues range from $20,000 per month (for the smaller units) and up, and cover fuel, crew, maintenance and a meal allowance for the owner.


-- Nephele



That is about half again what I guessed but I cannot say that I am surprised.  Still imagine what it might cost to run a similar airship (and where all you could visit.) 

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Angus A Fitziron
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Research Air Ship R.A.S. 'Saorsa'


« Reply #60 on: September 25, 2012, 07:45:49 pm »

Oh, it won't let me add my third choice - tower!



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Airship Artificer, part-time romantik and amateur Natural Philosopher

"wee all here are much troubled with the loss of poor Thompson & Sutton"
Captain
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


WWW
« Reply #61 on: September 25, 2012, 08:23:28 pm »

You might have to try and change a vote(?)  It won't let you do that will it?  It won't even let me increase the number of times folks can vote now.   Undecided

I used to have to drive through a tower on the way home form work in Germany. (Braunbach)



People actually lived in it.  I always wondered if they were deaf.  
« Last Edit: September 25, 2012, 08:33:25 pm by Captain » Logged
Shadow Of The Tower
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



« Reply #62 on: September 25, 2012, 10:07:42 pm »

Quote
SOTT:  I LOVE TOWERS!!  Are you going to face it in stone ... are there timbers in there ... are you weather tight yet? so many questions and not enough pictures.


I would love to face it in stone  but I do not have a source on my land and its very expensive to buy around here.

The foundation is mortared stone that I 'gathered' from local sources but the amount needed to face the whole thing isn't practical for me.

Yes, it is weather tight. I've been building this on a pay as you go basis so I've actually been finishing it from the inside out since this is the only place I have to live.

For the whole first year the only part of it that was livable was the bottom floor and there was no exterior stucco for the first three years.

Yes, it has an interior frame embedded in the straw. This was not strictly necessary but a frame allowed me to build the roof and floors first so that the straw bales would be protected from the very beginning. As any of the timber frame designers here will note, the frame is very lightweight, all of the shear forces are taken by the bales and stucco shells.

Its still a long way from being finished. Eventually this tower will be connected by the suspended second story addition that you can see in the earlier pictures to another tower (yet to be built) on the upper terrace. Building that addition, which is going to also contain my new kitchen has been my summer project.  Right now the bottom floor is devoted to kitchen/bathroom space (all my water is gravity fed from a tank in the third floor so its the only room I can get decent water pressure in)  When I'm able to move the kitchen stuff into the addition then that will free up the bottom floor which is going to be remodeled into a workshop/lab/brewery.

More pics, including some of the earlier stages :

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

« Last Edit: September 25, 2012, 10:10:02 pm by Shadow Of The Tower » Logged
Birdnest
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States



WWW
« Reply #63 on: September 25, 2012, 10:28:23 pm »

<snip>  As any of the timber frame designers here will note ...

That may include just me  Roll Eyes

None the less, thank you for your response.  It looks like it's coming right along!  (and I'll be coming by to collect that item in the window ... I suspect that it is a light?)  Are you in an area where you might have access to talis slides?  Perfect building stones created by the forces of nature.  Did the lack of stucco have any compromising effects on the hay bales?

Good luck and enjoy your building adventure!

(we are still adding to the Birdnest - and it took 2 years to make it liveable or at least not cluttered with construction shrapnel)
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Bolt Face
Gunner
**
United States United States


« Reply #64 on: September 26, 2012, 12:21:43 am »

I've always wanted to live in an old factory or warehouse:  lots of open space down below and living quarters up above.
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Captain Lyerly
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Ukraine Ukraine


At the helm of the Frumious Bandersnatch


« Reply #65 on: September 27, 2012, 12:44:43 am »

Quote
And livin' in the bell tower like that, they got a lot of
room downstairs where the pews used to be in.  Havin' all that room,
seein' as how they took out all the pews, they decided that they didn't
have to take out their garbage for a looong time

 Grin



Cheers!

Chas.
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von Corax
Squire of the Lambda Calculus
Board Moderator
Immortal
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Canada Canada

Prof. Darwin Prætorius von Corax


« Reply #66 on: September 27, 2012, 04:58:25 am »

Sounds vaguely familiar. Were there photos with circles and arrows involved?
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By the Beans of Life do my thoughts acquire speed
My hands acquire a shaking
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The Leverkusen Institute of Paleocybernetics is 5838 km from Reading
Sir Henry
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Poking the i's and drinking the t's


« Reply #67 on: September 27, 2012, 02:25:34 pm »

I've been designing my ideal home for about 40 years now, and throughout its variations it has always had a book tower. It will only be about 15' wide, with the inner walls completely lined with bookshelves. Inside of that will be a spiral staircase with a 6' wide central void. Except that it won't be a void - on the first floor will be an enclosed space with armchair, small table and adjustable lighting, the second floor will have a writing desk, chair and shelves for paper, pens, etc. and the top floor will have an observatory with a sliding glass roof and a high-powered telescope. Adjustable light (colour/brightness), sound and heat throughout.


One day...
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Captain
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


WWW
« Reply #68 on: September 27, 2012, 05:16:58 pm »

Sounds vaguely familiar. Were there photos with circles and arrows involved?


Gentlemen you might be dating yourselves a bit.  For any youngsters here who have been deprived of a worthwhile musical education: 
Arlo Guthrie/Alice's Restaurant


Since converting an old Gothic church to a home seems fairly popular:

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Sir Henry
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Poking the i's and drinking the t's


« Reply #69 on: September 27, 2012, 05:49:13 pm »

Since converting an old Gothic church to a home seems fairly popular:


Looks lovely, but just imagine the heating bills! You would have to heat about 40,000 square feet of air before it even came down to head height. Not really suitable for anywhere that might get snow.
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Captain
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


WWW
« Reply #70 on: September 27, 2012, 08:23:15 pm »

Since converting an old Gothic church to a home seems fairly popular:


Looks lovely, but just imagine the heating bills! You would have to heat about 40,000 square feet of air before it even came down to head height. Not really suitable for anywhere that might get snow.


I agree with you on the heating cost.  I think that an infloor radiant hydronic system, possibly combined with a high efficiency geothermal heatpump, could make even a large space like this very livable.  



I installed this in my cabin when I lived on a Tennessee mountain top and it was wonderful.  It more than lived up to the sales pitch.  It was silent, your feet were always warm, and even in the middle of winter our electric bill went up $11.00/month over only using a wood stove the previous winter.  This would be a feature of pretty much any dream home of mine (or my wife's) from now on.  

With such high ceilings I would probably either add a floor (or two) or at least a loft to get more usable space.  Zoning the heat, storm windows over the stained glass, ceiling fans, movable privacy partitions, wood stoves, adding insulation, and a fireplace could make a converted church extremely comfortable.  The same tactics might work on other re-purposed homes (silos, castles, & warehouses.)

I had wondered about using the surrounding seawater for an ultra-high efficiency heat pump on a liveaboard boat.  Of course numerous people told me that this would not work especially using a "backwards" water cooler or freezer core to exchange the heat.  However recently the large local NOAA lab installed just such an experimental device to their ocean side facility and brags that not only did their heating costs drop 75% but the building is now warmer.  http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/stories/2011/04/28_alaska_research_institure_goes_green.html
« Last Edit: September 27, 2012, 08:33:48 pm by Captain » Logged
bicyclebuilder
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Netherlands Netherlands


A.K.A. Scanner Camera Builder


« Reply #71 on: September 28, 2012, 09:16:22 am »

I agree Captain, an infloor radiant hydronic system, combined with a high efficiency geothermal heatpump is one of the best ways to heat a building. Along with proper insulation and ventilation with heat recovery.
With the current gas and oil prices, people are looking for an alternative. My wife's brother is living in a small old house with central heating, gas powered. The house also had a few chimneys for previous wood stoves. He decided to buy a few wood stoves, clean the chimneys and heat the house with stoves. After about a year, he got a visit from the gas company. They could't understand how he couldn't use more gas and where thinking he was tampering the gas meter.

Off topic, another problem he got into was via one of his hobby's/extra income. Scrap selling. He strolls websites like e-bay for free metal. Usually solarium are free to pick up because people want to get rid of them as they are space consuming when not used. A lot of metal, but also a lot of light tubes. After a couple of visits to the recycling center, they got suspicious and called the police. He was a suspect of growing weed.  Grin

Back to topic: downside of using an old building as a dreamhouse might be that it is a monumental building. You can't do all you want with your own house. Some monuments have to keep the outside appearence, but some also have to keep the interiour as is.
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Ada Thorold
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #72 on: September 28, 2012, 01:16:45 pm »

I agree Captain, an infloor radiant hydronic system, combined with a high efficiency geothermal heatpump is one of the best ways to heat a building.

We used to have it, so nice to have warm toes the whole time. One problem though, it was a rather early system and we couldn't fasten the floor boards down properly as we risked hitting a pipe. As a result every morning the heating would come on and all the boards would expand. First one up treads on them and every board in the place makes a resounding crack! Hopefully they have that problem sorted now.


He was a suspect of growing weed.  Grin

Reminds me of a news story from a while back, some old lady got the full swat treatment as they though she was growing weed in her garage due to the heat signature, she had actually left the heating on for her guinea pigs!
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Wormster
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United Kingdom United Kingdom



WWW
« Reply #73 on: September 28, 2012, 02:17:12 pm »

The Wormhole has been "in design" for more than 30 years.

Basically by taking many disparate building techniques and materials and combining them to produce a house with the lowest carbon footprint on the build AND without recourse to mains services at all. I can forsee many hurdles in this process, from obtaining the land, building regulations (FIE! to them I say!) and of course having the necessary amount of money to achieve this off grid utopian dream.

the house would not be your average run of the mill brick/timber/concrete construction, but rather a buried "earthship" using as many recycled materials as possible - rammed earth monolithic walls made from old car tiers, large south facing triple glazed windows (passive solar heating), rainwater harvesting for domestic water, composting toilet, reed bed filtration for waste water, ground pump heat recovery, solar photovoltaic and water heating, waterwheel electricity generator, underfloor heating, rocket stoves, methane digester (providing domestic gas for cooking) etc.....

One thing that I have been noodling about is a "calorific energy store" - rather than putting all the electricity into a battery store, and solar water heat into a tank, use ALL the electricity and heat generated to heat a large thermal mass that then converts the stored thermal energy into electricity via a heat exchange mechanism that also heats the underfloor system and the domestic water, its a closed loop system allowing total energy recovery.
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bicyclebuilder
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Netherlands Netherlands


A.K.A. Scanner Camera Builder


« Reply #74 on: September 28, 2012, 02:24:44 pm »

What are floor boards?  Wink
We put the pipes in the top layer of the concrete floor.
Actually, the construction of a floor is like this:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
A prefab concrete floor, about 5cm thick. Reinforced with rebar. On this we place the plumbing and ventilation ducts. Also tubes for electricity, tubes for water, gas and central heating.
When everything is mounted, a layer of about 18-20cm concrete mixed with pebbles is poured onto this. After that, we place the floor heating tubes. Over this, a layer of about 5cm runny concrete is poured. This evens out the floor and creates an even floor.

Back on topic: I've found propulsion for my howls castle:
Theo Jansen - Animaris Rhinoceros
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