The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 18, 2017, 07:44:33 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Poll
Question: Do you have a "dream home," steamy or otherwise?
A classic Victorian house.
"Retro-modern" house.
Old Gothic church.
Remote cabin.
Old farmhouse.
A liveaboard boat.
An underground or cave house.
A castle/palace.
A small studio apartment.
An RV so I can travel to more SP cons.
An airship.
Gypsy wagon.
A tent.
A craftsman style house.
A tower (silo, windmill, lighthouse, ATC, etc...)
I have no dreams.
Microhome.  3/26/16

Pages: 1 ... 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 [17] 18 19   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: POLL: Your (SP) Dream Home?  (Read 59090 times)
madamemarigold
Gunner
**
United States United States


« Reply #400 on: March 21, 2016, 08:44:25 pm »

I chose: Victorian house, old gothic church and a castle. The last one was a pick between a cave/underground home but a castle probably does have underground dungeons so.... Grin

I would love to decorate and live in anyone of them!
Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #401 on: March 24, 2016, 11:21:37 pm »



They would certainly  have the right atmosphere  and ambiance  for a steampunk setting
Logged
rovingjack
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States



WWW
« Reply #402 on: March 25, 2016, 09:28:53 am »

I got to tour a couple of tiny houses today. The tours really only take about 3 minutes each, but the hanging out and talking was a good hour or so.



 So it was just a small tour then  Cheesy

tiny.

To be honest the tiny house 'movement' keeps surprising me with it's stunning lack of creativity. The vast majority of chances anyone gets to see the design of a tiny house, they will pretty much be minor variations on the same 3 designs that everybody else has. For the most part the differences are 'arranging the furniture' levels of differences.

it surprises me how little learning many people are doing from Van dwellers, shepherds wagons, 'gypsy' wagons of old. Everybody just does the gabled rooves and bay windows on a room with a loft for the bed set on a trailer. They almost all do propane stoves, and RV refrigerators, with composting toilets or RV toilet with holding tank ect.

I'll admit I'm more into the idea of unique design ideas for tiny houses. Some of my designs are the Vardo ideas, with somewhat mad science looking additions (like water electrolysis through solar panels on a towing steam tractor roof, the electrolysis gets a hydroxy gas that could be used in cooking and get you distilled water from rain water caught coming off the roof in the bargain, while using and icyball design for refrigeration); others are a bit more cyberpunk in design, with a boxier industrial/futuristic look with less hand crafted and mad science, and more circuits, buttons, and displays.

I've also got a japanese style tea house idea with shoji screens and tansu, and a googie design idea with a balcony off the upstairs bedroom. There are so many forms to play with and so many techniques from people who live even tinier and nomadic that can be adapted.

Logged

Captain
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


WWW
« Reply #403 on: March 26, 2016, 01:48:48 pm »

I got to tour a couple of tiny houses today. The tours really only take about 3 minutes each, but the hanging out and talking was a good hour or so.



 So it was just a small tour then  Cheesy

tiny.

To be honest the tiny house 'movement' keeps surprising me with it's stunning lack of creativity. The vast majority of chances anyone gets to see the design of a tiny house, they will pretty much be minor variations on the same 3 designs that everybody else has. For the most part the differences are 'arranging the furniture' levels of differences.

it surprises me how little learning many people are doing from Van dwellers, shepherds wagons, 'gypsy' wagons of old. Everybody just does the gabled rooves and bay windows on a room with a loft for the bed set on a trailer. They almost all do propane stoves, and RV refrigerators, with composting toilets or RV toilet with holding tank ect.

I'll admit I'm more into the idea of unique design ideas for tiny houses. Some of my designs are the Vardo ideas, with somewhat mad science looking additions (like water electrolysis through solar panels on a towing steam tractor roof, the electrolysis gets a hydroxy gas that could be used in cooking and get you distilled water from rain water caught coming off the roof in the bargain, while using and icyball design for refrigeration); others are a bit more cyberpunk in design, with a boxier industrial/futuristic look with less hand crafted and mad science, and more circuits, buttons, and displays.

I've also got a japanese style tea house idea with shoji screens and tansu, and a googie design idea with a balcony off the upstairs bedroom. There are so many forms to play with and so many techniques from people who live even tinier and nomadic that can be adapted.



Tiny homes have been popular in some parts of Alaska like Fairbanks before they had a name.  I agree that they are not taking full advantage of alternate technology.  Solar and rain collection might not be very practical in Fairbanks but they apparently have mastered insulation. 

Although laws vary from state to state here in Alaska the line in the sand is whether or not you build a microhome on site or off and let the buyer come pick it up.  To build a residence of any size up to a 4-plex in Alaska requires both a professional contractor license (with insurance and $20,-25K bonding) but a Residential Endorsement Holder licensee who passed the state building exam and Arctic Building Course then has a 16 hour continuing education requirement every biennial renewal.  This is not impossible by any stretch but it is more than a minimalist who wants to build microhomes can easily wrap their heads around at first.  https://www.commerce.alaska.gov/web/cbpl/ProfessionalLicensing/ConstructionContractors.aspx  At least in Alaska you can talk to real liver person who can help get you licensed. 
On the other hand if you build microhomes in your backyard and the buyer wheels them off and sets them up on their own property all you need is a $50. business license.  This process is much simpler but you can see where the RV mentality would come from.  There are some advantages to the RV model though like installing 12v lighter style outlets.  Visit any truck stop and be amazed by all of the 12v appliances available cheap.  A old truck alternator can be turned into a 12v hydro generator, car batteries can build up surplus, or even old ceiling fans can be converted to generators.  Of course you could live in an old RV or boat similarly but have the ability to get up and move.  They might not be as insulated and energy efficient. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DA9Eq1rwATg  Wow.  I could not have scripted anything this typically Alaskan if I tried. 
Logged

-Karl
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #404 on: March 31, 2016, 09:09:53 am »



Shotgun shacks, workers cottages, miners cottages, railways houses, soldiers cottages etc from the past have always fascinated me.  They are space efficient,  frugal,  cosy  and full of character.

There is so much to wonder about them . How big families fitted themselves into them ? Who lived there over generations and transient  tenancy ?  How did they live ?  What their lives were like ?
Logged
Captain
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


WWW
« Reply #405 on: March 31, 2016, 02:35:59 pm »



Shotgun shacks, workers cottages, miners cottages, railways houses, soldiers cottages etc from the past have always fascinated me.  They are space efficient,  frugal,  cosy  and full of character.

There is so much to wonder about them . How big families fitted themselves into them ? Who lived there over generations and transient  tenancy ?  How did they live ?  What their lives were like ?


I have heard almost no one outside of North Carolina use the term "shotgun shack."

Common features that I noticed in these tiny, old homes was that their cast iron stove or fireplace was the family entertainment center as much as the heat source.  They usually have one comfy overstuffed chair or rocking chair.  Lots of roomy out buildings and maybe a wrap around porch.  Russians seem to have lived centered around a samovar. 

I have seen where several little shotgun shacks or old slave quarters had been drug together with ox teams to make bigger homes for growing families like:  http://fortdefiancenc.org/ 
Logged
morozow
Snr. Officer
****
Russian Federation Russian Federation



WWW
« Reply #406 on: March 31, 2016, 03:24:34 pm »



Shotgun shacks, workers cottages, miners cottages, railways houses, soldiers cottages etc from the past have always fascinated me.  They are space efficient,  frugal,  cosy  and full of character.

There is so much to wonder about them . How big families fitted themselves into them ? Who lived there over generations and transient  tenancy ?  How did they live ?  What their lives were like ?


I have heard almost no one outside of North Carolina use the term "shotgun shack."

Common features that I noticed in these tiny, old homes was that their cast iron stove or fireplace was the family entertainment center as much as the heat source.  They usually have one comfy overstuffed chair or rocking chair.  Lots of roomy out buildings and maybe a wrap around porch.  Russians seem to have lived centered around a samovar.  

I have seen where several little shotgun shacks or old slave quarters had been drug together with ox teams to make bigger homes for growing families like:  http://fortdefiancenc.org/  


Oh no! Smiley

1) Russia is it's big and different. Different climatic conditions, different neighbors, different histories. Why the Russians are different.

2) the Samovar important and loved. But it was expensive. Not every rural resident could not afford it.

The main thing in a village hut, Russian stove and it's "red corner" with a table.

The oven cooked food, oven warmed, slept on the oven, sometimes even bathed.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Well, at the table, gathered all the family for a meal. Countertop symbolized "God's hand", which gives the bread. The table to participate in many traditional ceremonies.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Logged

Sorry for the errors, rudeness and stupidity. It's not me, this online translator. Really convenient?
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #407 on: April 01, 2016, 10:01:54 am »



Shotgun shacks, workers cottages, miners cottages, railways houses, soldiers cottages etc from the past have always fascinated me.  They are space efficient,  frugal,  cosy  and full of character.

There is so much to wonder about them . How big families fitted themselves into them ? Who lived there over generations and transient  tenancy ?  How did they live ?  What their lives were like ?


I have heard almost no one outside of North Carolina use the term "shotgun shack."

Common features that I noticed in these tiny, old homes was that their cast iron stove or fireplace was the family entertainment center as much as the heat source.  They usually have one comfy overstuffed chair or rocking chair.  Lots of roomy out buildings and maybe a wrap around porch.  Russians seem to have lived centered around a samovar. 

I have seen where several little shotgun shacks or old slave quarters had been drug together with ox teams to make bigger homes for growing families like:  http://fortdefiancenc.org/ 


Which will explain why,  despite voluminous on line  definitions and wiki pages  under the term ,  there wan no library books under Shot gun shack or  house

There is also the term camel back shotgun house to describe   such a house with an extra storey built on at the back   
Logged
Captain
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


WWW
« Reply #408 on: April 03, 2016, 06:33:24 pm »



Shotgun shacks, workers cottages, miners cottages, railways houses, soldiers cottages etc from the past have always fascinated me.  They are space efficient,  frugal,  cosy  and full of character.

There is so much to wonder about them . How big families fitted themselves into them ? Who lived there over generations and transient  tenancy ?  How did they live ?  What their lives were like ?


I have heard almost no one outside of North Carolina use the term "shotgun shack."

Common features that I noticed in these tiny, old homes was that their cast iron stove or fireplace was the family entertainment center as much as the heat source.  They usually have one comfy overstuffed chair or rocking chair.  Lots of roomy out buildings and maybe a wrap around porch.  Russians seem to have lived centered around a samovar.  

I have seen where several little shotgun shacks or old slave quarters had been drug together with ox teams to make bigger homes for growing families like:  http://fortdefiancenc.org/  


Oh no! Smiley

1) Russia is it's big and different. Different climatic conditions, different neighbors, different histories. Why the Russians are different.

2) the Samovar important and loved. But it was expensive. Not every rural resident could not afford it.

The main thing in a village hut, Russian stove and it's "red corner" with a table.

The oven cooked food, oven warmed, slept on the oven, sometimes even bathed.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Well, at the table, gathered all the family for a meal. Countertop symbolized "God's hand", which gives the bread. The table to participate in many traditional ceremonies.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)


What would a dream home be like in Russia? 
Logged
morozow
Snr. Officer
****
Russian Federation Russian Federation



WWW
« Reply #409 on: April 03, 2016, 08:30:21 pm »

Interesting question.

I love old water tower or the lair in the factory building of red brick.

But I love the little Russian noble estates. And the hut with the Russian North. In recent times, probably older. Smiley

Here estate.


Spoiler (click to show/hide)


But of the hut.

It's from the Kizhi, Museum of wooden architecture - http://kizhi.karelia.ru/architecture/ .


Spoiler (click to show/hide)

And this Ural hut.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)


And this interiors. I think they are cozy.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

P. S. While wrote recalled that combines red brick and wood. In Russia, the Kaliningrad, formerly Konigsberg. It has an old Cathedral. There is a premise finished with wood, I loved it.
Logged
GCCC
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #410 on: May 18, 2016, 02:40:29 pm »

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DA9Eq1rwATg  Wow.  I could not have scripted anything this typically Alaskan if I tried. 

She answered one of my questions late in the video (and I'm thinking you really, really need to "go" if you're heading to the W.C. housed in a separate structure during an Alaskan winter!), but where do they shower? Is that also located in the outhouse?
Logged
GCCC
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #411 on: May 18, 2016, 02:43:09 pm »

Interesting question.

I love old water tower or the lair in the factory building of red brick.

But I love the little Russian noble estates. And the hut with the Russian North. In recent times, probably older. Smiley

Here estate.


Spoiler (click to show/hide)


But of the hut.

It's from the Kizhi, Museum of wooden architecture - http://kizhi.karelia.ru/architecture/ .


Spoiler (click to show/hide)

And this Ural hut.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)


And this interiors. I think they are cozy.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

P. S. While wrote recalled that combines red brick and wood. In Russia, the Kaliningrad, formerly Konigsberg. It has an old Cathedral. There is a premise finished with wood, I loved it.


I love almost everything about these. And those stoves! Thanks for giving us a glimpse.
Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #412 on: May 19, 2016, 01:19:27 am »



 The Russian homes above are wonderful
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #413 on: July 24, 2016, 10:57:34 am »

I've found mine.  Spring Cottage, Cliveden. 



Logged

Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #414 on: July 25, 2016, 02:59:16 am »



That is a special place .  What a place to sit  and swan around in the afternoon  sun
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #415 on: July 25, 2016, 05:56:34 pm »

I could never own it, of course.  It's a holiday cottage now and a one-night stay costs more than I earn in a month.  But the core architectural elements- the roofline, the attic windows, high angled chimneys, half timbering and the like- all grist to the mill should I ever decide to build my own house.   
Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #416 on: July 25, 2016, 07:40:18 pm »

I've found mine.  Spring Cottage, Cliveden.  






It's not the general style emulated by wealthy here in Austin (well at least since the 1970s.). But there are a couple of 1970s mansions along the Colorado River ("Lake Austin" and Bull Creek)  which look like that. I'm not an architect, but think Americans would refer to that look as "Tudor" (?).

Also, the vegetation along the river, some of it tropical, is truly prodigious, in some places almost like jungle.  Being older homes, the price will be below $2 million and some could be as low as $1 million. But you have to be happy with up to 42 Celsius /100 F weather in summer with humidity comparable to Singapore  Grin
« Last Edit: July 25, 2016, 07:52:48 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #417 on: July 25, 2016, 07:59:22 pm »

Tudor is close.  It's English Arts and Crafts, which was heavily rooted in the vernacular architecture of the Medieval/ Tudor period.  Incredibly the style as a whole can be regarded as a development of the Gothic Revival; from roughly the 1870s onward that particular movement split into two- on the one hand the ideas of truth to materials and truth to Medieval form evolved into Arts and Crafts, on the other the idea of the specific forms of Gothic (pointed arches, huge buttresses etc) evolved into the High Victorian style.   
Logged
Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #418 on: July 25, 2016, 11:58:26 pm »

I've been to Singapore.....hell NO!
Logged

Never ask 'Why?'
Always ask 'Why not!?'
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #419 on: July 26, 2016, 12:39:17 am »

I've been to Singapore.....hell NO!


Even lions grow fishtails over there Grin
Logged
chironex
Snr. Officer
****
Australia Australia


The typing jellyfish monster


« Reply #420 on: July 30, 2016, 02:05:20 pm »

I was thinking of a roughly square array of four grounded rail coaches, or perhaps three and a van for a shed. The problem is getting enough coaches that I would like; either clerestory or pullmann, which you won't find in Australia anywhere except either in the collection of someone who isn't going to sell or in too poor a condition. Then there's the problem of environmental impact, and of course at least a Category 4 cyclone rating!
Tudor is close.  It's English Arts and Crafts, which was heavily rooted in the vernacular architecture of the Medieval/ Tudor period.


I found one on the other side of the world:
http://thoughtengine.deviantart.com/art/West-End-Restoration-Inn-581381611

And this more Gothic one is currently up for grabs:
http://thoughtengine.deviantart.com/art/potters-house-582332950

This one might suit me (if only because I live alone):
http://thoughtengine.deviantart.com/art/Miners-cottage-609547431
Though I might like a tiny pod house, I am more likely to want to live in this cottage and use the pod house for a layout room or something...
Logged

Orkses is never beaten in battle. If we wins we wins and if we dies we dies fightin' so it don't count as beat. Even if we runs away it means we can always come back for anuvver go, see!

QUEENSLAND RAIL NOT FOR SALE!!!!!!
chironex
Snr. Officer
****
Australia Australia


The typing jellyfish monster


« Reply #421 on: July 30, 2016, 02:21:45 pm »

I don't know what they intend to do with this lot, now that the military museum is no longer there:
http://thoughtengine.deviantart.com/art/Kissing-Point-Fortifications-587726555
http://thoughtengine.deviantart.com/art/steps-to-the-magazine-446750885
and the area is being turned into a public space, it would count as underground, I think.

As would this:
https://hlj.com/product/ARI44481/Mil
« Last Edit: December 19, 2016, 08:45:45 am by chironex » Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #422 on: July 30, 2016, 05:06:10 pm »

I don't know what they intend to do with this lot, now that the military museum is no longer there:
http://thoughtengine.deviantart.com/art/Kissing-Point-Fortifications-587726555
http://thoughtengine.deviantart.com/art/steps-to-the-magazine-446750885
and the area is being turned into a public space, it it would count as underground, I think.

As would this:
https://hlj.com/product/ARI44481/Mil


Those brickwork arches are a thing of beauty.
Logged
Captain
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


WWW
« Reply #423 on: December 08, 2016, 04:07:52 pm »



A victorian microhouse.
Logged
Captain
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


WWW
« Reply #424 on: December 19, 2016, 01:22:48 am »

https://www.facebook.com/victorianhouses/?ref=feed_chaining 
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 [17] 18 19   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.388 seconds with 18 queries.