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Poll
Question: Do you have a "dream home," steamy or otherwise?
A classic Victorian house.
"Retro-modern" house.
Old Gothic church.
Remote cabin.
Old farmhouse.
A liveaboard boat.
An underground or cave house.
A castle/palace.
A small studio apartment.
An RV so I can travel to more SP cons.
An airship.
Gypsy wagon.
A tent.
A craftsman style house.
A tower (silo, windmill, lighthouse, ATC, etc...)
I have no dreams.
Microhome.  3/26/16

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Author Topic: POLL: Your (SP) Dream Home?  (Read 59110 times)
Maets
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« Reply #375 on: February 13, 2016, 10:01:35 pm »

Not my style, but the idea of the outside and inside being so different, I find fascinating.
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creagmor
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« Reply #376 on: February 13, 2016, 10:34:15 pm »

I don't want to hijack this thread, but after looking at the recent photos of the home made custom built camper vehicles, I was trying to remember what the name was of the factory built camper van that GM made for a few years. It used a Olds Toronado drive train (i.e. front wheel drive) and had dual rear axles with an airbag suspension. If anyone followed the Executioner stories Mack Bolan used  a much modified one (Including a retractable rocket launching rack in the roof) as his "war wagon".

Of all of the many good folks who read Brass Goggles there must be at least one person who can dredge up the name from their memories. I tried to find it on the internet but unfortunately the exercise proved fruitless.
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« Reply #377 on: February 13, 2016, 11:46:17 pm »

I don't want to hijack this thread, but after looking at the recent photos of the home made custom built camper vehicles, I was trying to remember what the name was of the factory built camper van that GM made for a few years. It used a Olds Toronado drive train (i.e. front wheel drive) and had dual rear axles with an airbag suspension. If anyone followed the Executioner stories Mack Bolan used  a much modified one (Including a retractable rocket launching rack in the roof) as his "war wagon".

Of all of the many good folks who read Brass Goggles there must be at least one person who can dredge up the name from their memories. I tried to find it on the internet but unfortunately the exercise proved fruitless.

What years / decade are we talking about? Are you talking about the front wheel drive transmission by GM? There was only one such front drive ever used, and it was simply under the GMC brand, in the 1970s.  In contrast a small universe of other rear drive GM camper platforms.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GMC_motorhome
« Last Edit: February 13, 2016, 11:48:59 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #378 on: February 14, 2016, 07:17:31 am »

I don't want to hijack this thread, but after looking at the recent photos of the home made custom built camper vehicles, I was trying to remember what the name was of the factory built camper van that GM made for a few years. It used a Olds Toronado drive train (i.e. front wheel drive) and had dual rear axles with an airbag suspension. If anyone followed the Executioner stories Mack Bolan used  a much modified one (Including a retractable rocket launching rack in the roof) as his "war wagon".

Of all of the many good folks who read Brass Goggles there must be at least one person who can dredge up the name from their memories. I tried to find it on the internet but unfortunately the exercise proved fruitless.

What years / decade are we talking about? Are you talking about the front wheel drive transmission by GM? There was only one such front drive ever used, and it was simply under the GMC brand, in the 1970s.  In contrast a small universe of other rear drive GM camper platforms.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GMC_motorhome

 That wiki article is food for thought.   There is potential for a dual  living space/ military  purpose.
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creagmor
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« Reply #379 on: February 14, 2016, 11:43:53 am »

the vehicles in question, (perhaps I should have referred to it as a camping van - somewhat akin to the Winnebago) was, if my memory is correct, introduced a couple of years after the Toronado. I also seem to remember that it was only produced for a very few years. More than that I cannot add.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #380 on: February 14, 2016, 11:14:00 pm »

the vehicles in question, (perhaps I should have referred to it as a camping van - somewhat akin to the Winnebago) was, if my memory is correct, introduced a couple of years after the Toronado. I also seem to remember that it was only produced for a very few years. More than that I cannot add.


There are only three types of motorised camping vehicles or recreational vehicles that I know; the integrated single body style which often is a conversion of a smaller people/cargo carrying van with a metal body, the "coach" type which is a typically a large fibreglass body built on top of a bare chassis "platform," and the third type which is a converted road/city bus, typically with a metallic body and thus much larger than the previous two types. The fourth type is the GMC above, but that doesn't exist anymore. EDIT: there is one more motor home that used the Toronado drivetrain. To be honest I had/have never seen one before, and is called the "Cortez Motor Home"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cortez_Motor_Home
http://cortezcoach.com/
Maybe this is what you're thinking about.  It was built between 1963 and 1979

If the one you're talking about doesn’t look like GMC in my previous post, or the one on the picture in my link above, then I'm afraid I don't know which one we're talking about.

By the way, the "Winnebago" style was basically a coach type fibreglass body over a chassis. They *always* employed a rear-drive city van or lorry chassis with a beefed-up engine. and they tended to be Dodge, Chevy, and almost never did I see Ford brand platforms, until way past 1980.

The only other unusual camper that comes to mind was the metal bodied Airstream Motor Home, which was nothing more than an adaptation of the aluminium skinned trailer/caravans of the same name, and visually looked like the GMC, but that is still a rear wheel drive coach-body on top of a full chassis. Nowadays, however Aistream have turned to Mercedes Benz vans to build their RV's, which look nothing like the ones I'm talking about.


http://www.classicairstreammotorhome.com/exterior.htm
http://www.airstream.com/



*snip*

That wiki article is food for thought.   There is potential for a dual  living space/ military  purpose.


The GMC I link in my previous post was unusual because it was built as a monocoque (fully integrated fibreglass and metal "clam shell") body the same way that modern cars are made now, and thus it saved space without having a lower steel beam lorry-type chassis.  Instead of a rear wheel drive it was front-wheel drive, and it was made for only 6 years, with a reputation for low-reliability, because the front wheel drive transmission tended to break down a lot (for obvious reasons - it was originally meant for automobiles, not trucks/lorries).

I almost bought one GMC years ago when I was about to become homeless.  Someone had one parked in his garden for about twenty years and just wanted to get rid of it, for next to zero money, on Craigslist. It looked nice in the pictures. But I backed down because I knew what the Texas hot and humid environment can do to a fibreglass bodied camper over the years. Besides the obvious engine problems (I would have had to put a new engine in) the coach would probably be infested with mice and all sorts of critters.  I knew because that is exactly what happened to my grandfather's 26 foot long Southwind/Chevy when we left it unattended for a period of 3-4 years. I had mould growing inside. The wooded substructure was rotted and presumably the aluminium structure intact, but the fibreglass had been breached by the elements. I sent the whole vehicle to the recycler, in exchange for a few hundred dollars.

It looks like there is a club for every camper type out there  Cheesy

http://www.gmcmotorhome.com/

The GMC was very futuristic at the time.  This was the era of Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Logan's Run, Star Wars and Battlestar Galactica  Cheesy

I wouldn't mind driving around in my GMC motorhome with hottie, Jenny Agutter... The fact that I was only about 8 years old back then doesn't help though  Grin  But being so modern we would certainly have a microwave (and associated cookbooks) in the motor home....

GMC Motorhome

Jenny Agutter in "Logan's Run" (1976)
« Last Edit: February 16, 2016, 08:43:52 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Maets
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« Reply #381 on: February 15, 2016, 12:37:53 am »

Did they come with the young lady?
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #382 on: February 15, 2016, 12:41:15 am »

Did they come with the young lady?

I wish...

It looks like the one in the picture above was sold for $26 000.  There are some people out there putting serious money into refurbishing these vehicles, and they're become coveted classics. You can tell the one below was repainted.


« Last Edit: February 15, 2016, 01:08:44 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
creagmor
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« Reply #383 on: February 15, 2016, 07:19:31 am »

Well done kind sir, you hit the nail on the head. that's exactly the one to which I was referring. Many thanks.   
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rovingjack
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« Reply #384 on: February 15, 2016, 08:56:44 am »

I found myself looking online today at the local list of craigs. Looking for my preferred towing vehicle, and trailer bases for building on.

It's occurred to me that I could look for fixers delight pop up campers. gut them to the trailer. salvage some parts for use in my finished designs, take some of the scraps and make things out of (plywood play furniture, garden caddy or frames for paintings, fabric into beach bags an purses ect) to sell on the list of craigs, ebay, or at the fleamarket or crafts fair.

My vehicle choice isn't retro or steamy but it would be very practical. http://pictures.dealer.com/p/planetsubarusne/1588/df02e69340463872018f729c25563dd4.jpg (the subaru baja is essentially an outback with the boot/trunk turned into a half sized open truck bed. It can tow about 2000 pounds, but can get about 28 miles to the gallon when not towing. And I've known some people who've worked on subarus before and they say the things are dang near modular. If I find a Baja with a good body but the motors so high milage that it's about dead, I should be able to take it to a dealer and they could drop and outback engine into it and set it out good as new.

The thing is if I had just a bit of money. I could have had both of these things for just about $5000, today. Between any fixing the car would need and anything I could make off the scrapping and crafts I could likely come out with totals about $7000-9000. I could turn the camper into a bow Top wagon for spring and summer to save up enough to make it a winter ready tiny home vardo before october.

But the biggest problems I encounter with things like that are, starting funds, work space, and a place to park it to live out of once it's done.
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« Reply #385 on: February 15, 2016, 09:00:57 am »

Well done kind sir, you hit the nail on the head. that's exactly the one to which I was referring. Many thanks.  


The Cortez, right?

Yeah I don't think I ever saw one in person.  I did notice in the search I did, that at some point NASA used a Cortez to move the astronauts to the launching site and for isolation.  Roll Eyes

1966 Clark Cortez motorhome

What is surprisng is that the Cortez was built for so many years.  According to the Internet it was built until 1979!  Huh It would have looked somewhat dated in comparison to the GMC motorhome.

Our Fleetwood Southwind would have looked nearly identical to this one:

1981 Fleetwood Southwind (26 ft)

In spite of being newer, the Southwind was not as nice looking as the older GMC's above

And our previous 1973 Dodge Pacer motorhome would have looked similar to this one.  Guess which one travelled the most miles and went farther?

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CbPYP9xUUAEngEt.jpg
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« Reply #386 on: February 15, 2016, 09:07:08 am »

I found myself looking online today at the local list of craigs. Looking for my preferred towing vehicle, and trailer bases for building on.

It's occurred to me that I could look for fixers delight pop up campers. gut them to the trailer. salvage some parts for use in my finished designs, take some of the scraps and make things out of (plywood play furniture, garden caddy or frames for paintings, fabric into beach bags an purses ect) to sell on the list of craigs, ebay, or at the fleamarket or crafts fair.

My vehicle choice isn't retro or steamy but it would be very practical. http://pictures.dealer.com/p/planetsubarusne/1588/df02e69340463872018f729c25563dd4.jpg (the subaru baja is essentially an outback with the boot/trunk turned into a half sized open truck bed.

*snip*


If you had a pickup already why not do something like this?


Or more like this?

« Last Edit: February 15, 2016, 09:22:05 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #387 on: February 15, 2016, 09:16:35 am »

Kudos to this guy:


Look! A rolling Hobbit house!

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« Reply #388 on: February 15, 2016, 09:31:34 am »


Look! A rolling Hobbit house!


That might be Diogenes.
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« Reply #389 on: February 15, 2016, 09:39:05 am »


Look! A rolling Hobbit house!


That might be Diogenes.

But then shouldn't that be a large ceramic pot?
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #390 on: February 15, 2016, 06:14:07 pm »



 Ford Transit vans were  excessively popular here in the 70s and 80s. Every teenage boy aspired to have one. They came plain or kitted out with seats or bed space. There was room to place a pop up cooking area. They were the preferred option of hippies and older folk on tiki tours


 There was also the Bedford van  that was similar in style and use .



 Older  versions of these vehicles have  a strong steampunk potential







 

 
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Cora Courcelle
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« Reply #391 on: February 15, 2016, 09:59:09 pm »

Not steampunk, but this is certainly somebodies dream home.

http://www.today.com/home/home-looks-normal-outside-it-s-medieval-castle-inside-t72976

Outside not so much


But inside!





Well the incredibly modern mixer tap certainly makes a statement ... 'I didn't think this through properly!'
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« Reply #392 on: February 16, 2016, 08:10:50 am »

@ J Wilhelm: The one to which I was referring was the first image you posted. Never heard of the Cortez, even before moving to South Africa  in 2008.

@ Hurricane Annie: At one time there was a magazine that was mostly devoted to the van conversions you depicted in the first images of your last post. It would be interesting to know how many second generation hippies were conceived within them; and whatever became of those kids - and the vans. hopefully the former faired much better than the latter.     
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« Reply #393 on: February 16, 2016, 08:36:02 am »

@ J Wilhelm: The one to which I was referring was the first image you posted. Never heard of the Cortez, even before moving to South Africa  in 2008.

@ Hurricane Annie: At one time there was a magazine that was mostly devoted to the van conversions you depicted in the first images of your last post. It would be interesting to know how many second generation hippies were conceived within them; and whatever became of those kids - and the vans. hopefully the former faired much better than the latter.    

OK then you're talking about the GMC Motorhome (model years 1973-1978). It's in some way the descendent of the Cortez, since the Cortez was the first to use the Toronado drivetrain.

The GMC Motorhome had no other name. Also there was no "coach maker." It was manufactured in it's entirety by General Motors under the GMC truck brand, which is very unusual (as has never been repeated as far as I know).
« Last Edit: February 16, 2016, 08:52:04 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #394 on: February 19, 2016, 06:47:53 am »

@ J Wilhelm: The one to which I was referring was the first image you posted. Never heard of the Cortez, even before moving to South Africa  in 2008.

@ Hurricane Annie: At one time there was a magazine that was mostly devoted to the van conversions you depicted in the first images of your last post. It would be interesting to know how many second generation hippies were conceived within them; and whatever became of those kids - and the vans. hopefully the former faired much better than the latter.     

 Those children may well be the steampunks of today  - conceived to all that heavy metal

Jenny Agutter  took the rail way line to  the 1950s and became an nun  [ Call the Midwife ]
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rovingjack
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« Reply #395 on: March 11, 2016, 05:06:06 am »

I've been looking at van dwelling ideas and it looks both insanely difficult living, and a heck of an adventure. But looking through it all I keep coming back to something almost everybody mentions as a problem but I've yet to see anybody say they figured out. Moisture. cars fog up in the right situations just going for a drive. If you sleep and prepare food, and wash up in one how do you control moisture without opening the whole thing. Especially for those of us who have several months of cold weather where a vent fan would just blow all the warm air out.
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Lady Orpah Bellamy
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« Reply #396 on: March 11, 2016, 11:35:25 pm »

I opted for castle. Anyone who watched Outlander will know Castle Leoch from the show, its a real castle a few miles from where I live in Scotland. I would prefer to time travel there and live in it in its original state though lol (as does the leading lady in the show)



Castle Doune, in Perthshire Smiley
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rovingjack
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« Reply #397 on: March 19, 2016, 05:00:42 am »

I got to tour a couple of tiny houses today. The tours really only take about 3 minutes each, but the hanging out and talking was a good hour or so.

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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #398 on: March 21, 2016, 07:50:40 am »

I opted for castle. Anyone who watched Outlander will know Castle Leoch from the show, its a real castle a few miles from where I live in Scotland. I would prefer to time travel there and live in it in its original state though lol (as does the leading lady in the show)



Castle Doune, in Perthshire Smiley


 it is a  good solid castle. The Scots did good castles.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #399 on: March 21, 2016, 07:51:40 am »

I got to tour a couple of tiny houses today. The tours really only take about 3 minutes each, but the hanging out and talking was a good hour or so.



 So it was just a small tour then  Cheesy
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