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Poll
Question: Do you have a "dream home," steamy or otherwise?
A classic Victorian house.
"Retro-modern" house.
Old Gothic church.
Remote cabin.
Old farmhouse.
A liveaboard boat.
An underground or cave house.
A castle/palace.
A small studio apartment.
An RV so I can travel to more SP cons.
An airship.
Gypsy wagon.
A tent.
A craftsman style house.
A tower (silo, windmill, lighthouse, ATC, etc...)
I have no dreams.
Microhome.  3/26/16

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Author Topic: POLL: Your (SP) Dream Home?  (Read 59168 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #350 on: August 01, 2015, 12:45:40 am »

It looks like many people saw the same potential as I did.  There are two types, one just using the cab and building a larger fiberglass "caravan" style body, and the smaller type which use the metal body and cut out the windows.  I'm thinking about the latter type.  Looks very solid to me.

http://www.rv.net/forum/index.cfm/fuseaction/thread/tid/26911253/print/true.cfm
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selectedgrub
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« Reply #351 on: August 01, 2015, 01:44:55 am »

In the 70's we were famous for house bus's.
Shipping crates and old corrugated iron fences, Hippies fashioned their homes from them.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Housetrucker









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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #352 on: August 01, 2015, 01:54:55 am »

I like the 2nd or from the top.  But it'd be difficult to travel over some major highways (ie Interstate Highways 10, and Cool on account of bridges.  It can't be taller than a semi truck, else you risk losing half your vehicle in the underpass  Grin
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Drew P
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« Reply #353 on: August 01, 2015, 01:57:25 am »

You need to buy a used van/RV and rehab it. Cheaper and you're going to chop it to pieces anyhow and make it to your specs so...
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #354 on: August 01, 2015, 02:02:43 am »

Yeh.  But by now I figure that Dodge RAM "Master- something or other" will be available used after a couple of years...

Definitely I'd do it as a DIY project.  The quality of the furniture hardware on most RV is really horrible.  We were constantly replacing broken plastic parts, such as door latches and the like.  Now that I'm a Steampunk maker, I know for a fact there us a lot of good quality hardware out there.  Building it myself will inevitably result in a better product and I won't have to spend six figures for the blasted RV
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GCCC
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« Reply #355 on: August 01, 2015, 05:21:06 pm »

At my place of employment, we have a boiler mechanic who comes rather often to fix our equipment. He drives a rather large delivery van, which is tall enough such that you can walk upright inside the the cargo area.

It looks very interesting to me, because it's large enough to make a very decent recreational vehicle, somewhere between the "Mini Winnie" size and the small bus size RVs.

http://m.ramtrucks.com/en/mobile/vehicles/2015/ram-promaster/

I admire the vehicle every time it comes, and imagine the types of windows I'd install on the sides. I think it would look nice in dark metallic green or milk chocolate brown.

 Once I knew a friend of my grandfather, college buddy from the 1942 class, who built his own trailer in the 1980s.  Seems reasonable I could do the same.

 In the early 80s, I used to travel in my grandparents' 25 ft long Southwind (chevy truck/ lorry chassis based) RV all over the West, and it's Achilles heel was the wooden frame and fiberglass construction of the body, which eventually rotted away.

I figure a cargo van like this could be fitted with a folding bunk hanging from the ceiling. And probably fit all the amenities needed.

Just perfect to go West and lose oneself in the vicinity of the Grand Canyon, go visit Yosemite Natl. Park or swing by Vail, Aspen and the Rocky Mountains

Sadly the price will be north of $27000-$32000 for a "blank" van...




The only way I could stand up in this van is if I don't wear any shoes...

*sigh*

Also, I didn't see any camera capability to compensate for not being able to see out side windows.

Such a thing is waaaay beyond my skill sets, but I'd have to agree with other commenters that you might be better rehabbing/refurbishing a fixer-upper for all the work you'd need to do to make it fit your needs.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #356 on: August 02, 2015, 12:56:49 am »

*points to post directly above yours*

It's all dreams anyway, but to me a metal bodied van is ideal. Better than the fiber glass body.  I see it a pretty tall - I'll review the actual height specs on my PC (as opposed to my phone), but I see many mini campers out there that are much smaller (eg VW based campers).

Fixer uppers can be a nightmare, if you have traveled as much as I have when I was a kid.  I've been all over the West from Canada to Baja, and from Texas to the Mexican border with Guatemala on a 19-ft Pacer brand Minnie-Winnie style modified Dodge-van.  We loved that vehicle.  When we got the 25 ft Southwind we were far more comfortable but paid a serious in mobility and maneuverability.  Only went to Mexico City once with it, but did travel most Western Startes and British Columbia on the larger RV.

EDIT: Sorry for the typos.  My phone acting up again (and what the hell is an "Ionia"??)
« Last Edit: August 02, 2015, 07:11:16 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #357 on: August 02, 2015, 01:02:40 am »

I agree metal is better than fiberglass, and for your purposes you also need to consider ground clearance.

(But who am I talking to--a fellow Texican--you know all about how important ground clearance is around here...)
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #358 on: August 03, 2015, 06:23:27 pm »

I agree metal is better than fiberglass, and for your purposes you also need to consider ground clearance.

(But who am I talking to--a fellow Texican--you know all about how important ground clearance is around here...)

What is the standard?  Two armadillos in height?
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GCCC
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« Reply #359 on: August 03, 2015, 10:38:07 pm »

I agree metal is better than fiberglass, and for your purposes you also need to consider ground clearance.

(But who am I talking to--a fellow Texican--you know all about how important ground clearance is around here...)

What is the standard?  Two armadillos in height?

Ha! Pretty much!

Hit one of those with the tire once, doing between 25-30 mph...The front end (of my car, not the critter) jumped up at least five feet, and it rattled my teeth when I came back down. I swear sometimes they aim for your vehicle...
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #360 on: August 04, 2015, 10:00:53 am »

Any of the mansions built in the decades after the 1849 Gold Rush at the American Barbary Coast of San Francisco will do fine.  I just may have to take a 50-year fire and earthquake insurance policy:

« Last Edit: August 04, 2015, 10:15:30 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
rovingjack
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« Reply #361 on: February 01, 2016, 08:21:54 am »

Necromancy!

I just thought I'd revisit this, as my tiny house/vardo idea has been on my mind again lately. In part because I really do wish I could escape my life.

It may also be in part because it looks more and more impossible to achieve as time goes by, and nothing makes me double down like being told it'll never work.

I've been thinking that with my current car not really fit for towing so much as a bag of golf clubs, that I'll likely have to invest in something anyway, I might just as easily start with a van or RV that I can fix up and/or mod. Live in that long enough to save up and work on a vardo to tow behind it.

of course it also allows that I can do one of them in a deco style and the other in another style. and by living in them, maybe get to a point where I can purchase a bit of land, park them, build a hobbit hole post and beam interior cob earthship style home and then maybe get a steam tractor for towing a vardo home for special shows and events.

it is the dream at least.
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« Reply #362 on: February 02, 2016, 05:17:56 am »

http://www.gizmag.com/green-magic-homes/40575/ 

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« Reply #363 on: February 02, 2016, 10:44:26 am »

yeah I've seen those and they are tempting for ease, but the living roof on them tends to be a bit more of a chia pet than an honest underground home.

My inclination is post and beam cob, with a rock wool or aerocrete insulation layer, with weather proofed outside finish, surrounded by drainage gravel covered in standing seam roofing and more drainage gravel with pete moss and then make a hugelkultur layer on top of that.

I think the biggest problems would be moisture and critters. I think we can solve the moisture with airflow. The mice and bugs might be trickier to solve.
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« Reply #364 on: February 02, 2016, 03:06:52 pm »

Before moving to Alaska we had a nice little cabin in NE TN in a small, loose knit community called "Mining Town Road."  The mountain ridge line had been stripped mined for iron ore during WW II then even though there were no laws requiring it then, roughly restored to its natural shape.  There was a small miners' village but only foundations were left.  Hardwood forests reclaimed the mountain and the community grew up.  Because of the mining our basements were all bone dry as were many of our neighbors' wells every September.  The wood in adn under our cabins looked like it had just come out of a saw mill even though many were built in the 70s.  On fellow even had an underground log cabin that he bragged up.  I know that an underground log cabin is hard to visualize but you just had to see it. 

Any way, the point is that there are lots of old strip mines that sell very cheap, regrow quite nice, and could be ideal for a deeper underground home.

We did have a snake problem which is probably why we did not have a mouse problem.  Lime, moth balls, and other hill billy remedies helped get rid of the snakes. 
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« Reply #365 on: February 05, 2016, 08:47:16 pm »

The house where I grew up in had a 4 storey high underground tunnel,  which still to date connects the garage at street level with the first  floor of the  house on top of the hill.  We hardly ever had any humidity problems in the storage room I  the middle of the tunnel.  My grandfather must have worked out drainage lines behind the granite boulder walls. The roof of the tunnel/staircase were pre-tensioned concrete foam slabs held up with I-beam frames every few feet along the length of the tunnel.

Neighbors who built their house at street level had to excavate a 3-4 storey high wedge of Hill and even with channels they often had horrible humidity problems.  Our immediate neighbour (with whom we had constant fights on account of his breeding Collie dogs) , who spent a ridiculous amount of money to build a contemporary concrete 4000 Sq. Ft. home,  even had a 1 foot high flooding event one good summer  Grin We watched the mouldy furniture being taken out to the street along with the dogs.
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Cora Courcelle
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« Reply #366 on: February 05, 2016, 10:13:44 pm »

I spent my early childhood in a house that was a mix of tudor and Victorian and therefore although I'd love one that looked either, I want modern plumbing and heating inside please!
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« Reply #367 on: February 06, 2016, 01:17:19 am »

The house where I grew up in had a 4 storey high underground tunnel,  which still to date connects the garage at street level with the first  floor of the  house on top of the hill.  We hardly ever had any humidity problems in the storage room I  the middle of the tunnel.  My grandfather must have worked out drainage lines behind the granite boulder walls. The roof of the tunnel/staircase were pre-tensioned concrete foam slabs held up with I-beam frames every few feet along the length of the tunnel.

Neighbors who built their house at street level had to excavate a 3-4 storey high wedge of Hill and even with channels they often had horrible humidity problems.  Our immediate neighbour (with whom we had constant fights on account of his breeding Collie dogs) , who spent a ridiculous amount of money to build a contemporary concrete 4000 Sq. Ft. home,  even had a 1 foot high flooding event one good summer  Grin We watched the mouldy furniture being taken out to the street along with the dogs.

Very unusual. Any pictures?
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #368 on: February 06, 2016, 02:01:37 am »

The house where I grew up in had a 4 storey high underground tunnel,  which still to date connects the garage at street level with the first  floor of the  house on top of the hill.  We hardly ever had any humidity problems in the storage room I  the middle of the tunnel.  My grandfather must have worked out drainage lines behind the granite boulder walls. The roof of the tunnel/staircase were pre-tensioned concrete foam slabs held up with I-beam frames every few feet along the length of the tunnel.

Neighbors who built their house at street level had to excavate a 3-4 storey high wedge of Hill and even with channels they often had horrible humidity problems.  Our immediate neighbour (with whom we had constant fights on account of his breeding Collie dogs) , who spent a ridiculous amount of money to build a contemporary concrete 4000 Sq. Ft. home,  even had a 1 foot high flooding event one good summer  Grin We watched the mouldy furniture being taken out to the street along with the dogs.

Very unusual. Any pictures?
Look at the beginning of the thread.  One of the earliest posts in this thread I think...
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« Reply #369 on: February 06, 2016, 02:23:26 am »

Thanks.  I remember seeing it then.  Definitely an unusual place.  Thanks again.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #370 on: February 06, 2016, 08:05:03 am »

Thanks.  I remember seeing it then.  Definitely an unusual place.  Thanks again.

There doesn't seem to be a day I'm not reminded of it. I so want to go back.  But it may be impossible to regain my previous life.
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« Reply #371 on: February 08, 2016, 09:11:23 pm »

We, in Russia, houses in inappropriate buildings, are extremely rare.

But Alexander Lunev has managed to equip the house in an old water tower in Tomsk.

It was difficult, financially and legally, but he managed.



Spoiler (click to show/hide)

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« Reply #372 on: February 09, 2016, 02:46:14 am »



 I keep dreaming of an old house in its various states of repair. I am sure it is the same house.  But I just cant place it.

 It is  of an Arts and Crafts style  with brick , weatherboard and stucco. In New Zealand  these homes are some what plainer to metropolis

 something similar to this


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« Reply #373 on: February 13, 2016, 06:11:45 pm »

Not steampunk, but this is certainly somebodies dream home.

http://www.today.com/home/home-looks-normal-outside-it-s-medieval-castle-inside-t72976

Outside not so much


But inside!


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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #374 on: February 13, 2016, 08:22:22 pm »

Not steampunk, but this is certainly somebodies dream home.

http://www.today.com/home/home-looks-normal-outside-it-s-medieval-castle-inside-t72976

Outside not so much


But inside!




I'm not sure I'm into the decor. The house looks unassuming from the outside. I kind of see where they were going,  but it's a mish mash.
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