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Poll
Question: Do you have a "dream home," steamy or otherwise?
A classic Victorian house.
"Retro-modern" house.
Old Gothic church.
Remote cabin.
Old farmhouse.
A liveaboard boat.
An underground or cave house.
A castle/palace.
A small studio apartment.
An RV so I can travel to more SP cons.
An airship.
Gypsy wagon.
A tent.
A craftsman style house.
A tower (silo, windmill, lighthouse, ATC, etc...)
I have no dreams.
Microhome.  3/26/16

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Author Topic: POLL: Your (SP) Dream Home?  (Read 59640 times)
von Corax
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« Reply #25 on: September 22, 2012, 01:57:51 am »

Right now we live in a house similair to this:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Totally un-Steampunkable. To Steampunk any room would be in vain, because of the overall look of the house. Probably just the bathroom or garage could be Steampunked.

I can actually see some potential there, I just can't pin it down.

What about reskinning the front to look like (or at least suggest) a Victorian brownstone?
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« Reply #26 on: September 22, 2012, 02:09:53 am »

Right now we live in a house similair to this:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Totally un-Steampunkable. To Steampunk any room would be in vain, because of the overall look of the house. Probably just the bathroom or garage could be Steampunked.

I can actually see some potential there, I just can't pin it down.

What about reskinning the front to look like (or at least suggest) a Victorian brownstone?



Brownstone like this?: 
Needs some bay windows
http://www.oldhouses.com/cf/displaylisting.cfm?q_listingid=1177&searchlist=1177,48,50,235,49,1043,8275,7009,4828,4023,247,5289,8892,9173,8157&searchname=Brownstone%20Style&searchdest=%2Fcf%2Farchivelist.cfm%3Fq_styleid%3D19%26searchname%3DBrownstone%2BStyle

if not something like this
http://www.oldhouses.com/cf/displaylisting.cfm?q_listingid=48&searchlist=1177,48,50,235,49,1043,8275,7009,4828,4023,247,5289,8892,9173,8157&searchname=Brownstone%20Style&searchdest=%2Fcf%2Farchivelist.cfm%3Fq_styleid%3D19%26searchname%3DBrownstone%2BStyle
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von Corax
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« Reply #27 on: September 22, 2012, 03:02:31 am »

Something along the lines of the Chicago building (the second link) would be easier to achieve through purely cosmetic (ie. non-structural) alterations.

Worst case: get some sheets of expanded styrene foam (the blue or pink stuff) and spray it with a solvent-based weather-proof brown paint…
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James Harrison
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« Reply #28 on: September 22, 2012, 02:20:26 pm »

Worst case: get some sheets of expanded styrene foam (the blue or pink stuff) and spray it with a solvent-based weather-proof brown paint…

But the solvent would attack the foam and leave it looking like someone had sprayed *something* brown all over the house....
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« Reply #29 on: September 22, 2012, 02:28:45 pm »

Over the last couple of days my dream house has been getting upgraded.  The roof is being replaced (tired of putting pots to collect the drips when it rains)  The upgrade is the addition of a skylight over the stairs that brings in a lot of light to an otherwise dark stair well.
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von Corax
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« Reply #30 on: September 23, 2012, 03:10:45 am »

Worst case: get some sheets of expanded styrene foam (the blue or pink stuff) and spray it with a solvent-based weather-proof brown paint…

But the solvent would attack the foam and leave it looking like someone had sprayed *something* brown all over the house....

Ideally you'll get a light etch that looks like sandstone.

(That's the theory, anyway…)
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #31 on: September 23, 2012, 05:18:45 am »

Faux finishes on styrene and even styrofoam have been sold in the past for the residential construction market.  Mind you, I looked down on the technology, because my grandfather's business once we moved to the USA, involved selling carved natural stone (façades, columns, fireplaces, etc.). After even the cheapest sandstone, not even the best faux finish would look good.  However, I'm quite sure the techniques exist (cheapest: stucco on styrofoam), some of thanks to the Hollowood movie industry.  Look around, you may find "stone blocks" in the market already.
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Captain
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« Reply #32 on: September 23, 2012, 07:19:08 am »



This is a styrofoam(?) structure set up at PENNSIC.  I helped someone make a similar one out of blueboard.   It might not last too long on a permanent building but at least your heating cost should be reduced.   Wink
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-Karl
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« Reply #33 on: September 23, 2012, 09:50:38 am »

I would want to live here when its finished:







Luckily, It is where I do live. Unfortunately, I'm the only one who is going to get it finished. Servants, I need Servants!
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bicyclebuilder
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« Reply #34 on: September 24, 2012, 10:10:14 am »

I have seen styrofoam finishes, but only when I was in Canada on vacation. At that time (I was halfway in my teens) it was quite a culture shock. These people build houses out of wood and styrofoam? Why not brick? Haven't these people heared of the story with the three little pigs?  Wink
Seriously, if I would transform our house with faux finishing, I would probably have to import it from the USA or Canada. Over here in the Netherlands, we tend to use "real" materials.
One of the positive things about our house is that it gets a lot of sunlight inside, thru the big windows. If we would have to renovate, we would like to keep the glass area the way it is. Steampunking or Victorianising it, would probably be a victorian greenhouse effect.
We can't just change the face of the house, actually. Because the city have some saying into that. Renovating on a large scale has to be requested to "Construction and housing". The renovation has to be made public before work and anyone who is against it, may file a complaint. It might be burocracy, but it prevents a meltingpot of different styles and it monitors the proper construction is done.
Therefore: a moving castle. A quick google into the real world shows me someone who thinks alike.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Now to find a way to make this all-terrain, like howl's castle.  Grin
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« Reply #35 on: September 24, 2012, 10:26:13 am »

I have seen styrofoam finishes, but only when I was in Canada on vacation. At that time (I was halfway in my teens) it was quite a culture shock. These people build houses out of wood and styrofoam? Why not brick? Haven't these people heared of the story with the three little pigs?  Wink

It is a shock. isn't it?  Born in the USA, I was raised south of the border, and the same thing happened to me when I visited family, because every residential project is made out of wood.  But I came so often to the USA during the summer that I got used to it as a child.  By the time I came to back to the USA at age 18, it was second nature to me to see this, but Mexican friends could not believe that those "little sticks of wood" were not just a temporary support system  Grin  The only thing always admired were the hardware stores which clearly showed the love affair we Americans have with wood-working.  All sorts of tools have been invented to do this and do that....   Grin   I don;t think that my fellow countrymen appreciate how preponderant wood is in every day life in the USA (school desks, for example), compared to other countries.

Even $5 mill. mansions are made in wood!  You'd be surprised the size of buildings that are made in stud+plywood+ sheet-rock method.  I often wonder how many countries have wood construction as a typical method besides USA and Canada?  Japan perhaps?  You have to posses large forests historically to have enough wood available and make this a traditional method of construction...
« Last Edit: September 24, 2012, 10:34:23 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Shadow Of The Tower
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« Reply #36 on: September 24, 2012, 11:05:10 am »

Of course part of the crappy "standard" american lightweight construction method is that it is vastly cheaper than most the alternatives (at least in this country) I don't know how it is in netherlands but here even a timber framed houses are generally reserved for the very well off and actual stone is the realm (most often) of millionaires.  Even our brick houses are generally wood underneath. Brick is most often a siding material here rather than an actual structural component.

However, I despise standard construction but not having the money to import stone I elected to go with stuccoed straw bale. It gives me walls with 3-4 times the regular insulative value and yet costs about 1/5th the price of standard construction.  It also lets me easily build curved walls and have the security of a house that is nearly fireproof and much stronger than the norm.

Of course, as a drawback it takes A LOT of time to build this way.
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Ada Thorold
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« Reply #37 on: September 24, 2012, 11:15:32 am »

I often wonder how many countries have wood construction as a typical method besides USA and Canada?  Japan perhaps?  You have to posses large forests historically to have enough wood available and make this a traditional method of construction...


We have our Black and White type construction over here:



A few are still built in this method but the cost of oak rather prohibits it for everyday use. As for softwood, quite a few houses and small blocks of apartments are now built in timber frame but we tend to skin them in brick so people never know.

~A~
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Captain
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« Reply #38 on: September 24, 2012, 05:37:09 pm »

  Do you happen to have any pictures of the inside? 

bicyclebuilder - Some of the first brick makers in what is now the US were from the Netherlands: http://brickcollecting.com/history.htm

Here almost all homes are wood since there are no local brick makers and, with no roads in or out, all bricks must be barged about 600 miles to get here.  There is even less stone masonry but that is mostly because it seems to be a dying skill.   Sad

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Birdnest
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« Reply #39 on: September 24, 2012, 05:57:39 pm »

I often wonder how many countries have wood construction as a typical method besides USA and Canada?  Japan perhaps?  You have to posses large forests historically to have enough wood available and make this a traditional method of construction...


We have our Black and White type construction over here:



A few are still built in this method but the cost of oak rather prohibits it for everyday use. As for softwood, quite a few houses and small blocks of apartments are now built in timber frame but we tend to skin them in brick so people never know.

~A~


Interesting mention there ... I've been designing timber frames for 20+ years and I can say that the infill (wattle) type frames were done because there was not an expedient means to build an envelope wall.  The old infill walls had to be replaced and were not the greatest for not leaking air or water.  The Amish in North America took up the habit of building large generic structures and covering them with brick or basic balloon framing.  THEN we had a couple of world wars and a big nasty depression - and all of the crafters were lost.  Timber frame resurfaced in the mid 70's here in the US (not too sure if it ever stopped in the UK) and everything was and is about insulation (hence, the envelope on the outside). Timber frames also have the added bonus of not having any bearing walls, so one can completely re-arrange the interior, punch in new doors and windows with reckless abandon (the Amish do this with their big generic structures as needed to address the needs for the building).   This made a lot of sense in the days of old ... structures took a lot of time and resources.  building one that was adjustable and long lasting was smart.  

Another note for Bicyclebuilder, timber frames are structurally efficient and have a very long lifespan - it's worth finding or even importing the timbers.  You can build the envelope from most anything because it does not need to be structural.  So, forest or not, timber frames don't use that much wood.

sold yet? ...  Wink

As of late (speaking for North America), oak of fir is a personal preference ... oak is heavy, prone to unpredictable movements and burns your tools. IMHO, oak isn't really good for very complex structures.  There's also Douglas Fir (not actually fir, but an individual species of 'softwood') ... I say 'softwood' in quotes because once it's dry it is quite hard.  Well graded fir is fairly light and flexible and quite predictable if the grain is tight and straight.  Both fir and oak grow like weeds in North America.  FYI - pine sucks ... not that strong and prone to rot.

The term 'black and white' is a new one to me ... although I'd paint it forest green, black, rose and blue!!.

The Birdnest (hence my screen name ...) is a traditional small chalet style full timber frame with the exterior envelope.  This is the house of my dreams and a canvas for my 'steampunk' musings (although I built it long before I ever knew of this steampunk term ... I always thought of it as retro-futuristic).  I don't think I could ever live in some huge grand Victorian home ... although I LOVE them with a burning passion.  My ultimate dream is to duplicate the Birdnest in regional styles near the ocean in a tropical environment for escaping the frozen or smokey times.  I had mentioned Cave Dwelling ... this would be my workshop overlooking the ocean accessed from a secret circular stair from within my small home.  A Gothic church I would find useful for a recording studio or Art Gallery ... with living space to provide me with a city dwelling for those rare times that I felt some mutant need to live in a city.



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« Reply #40 on: September 24, 2012, 06:01:43 pm »

I would have a suite of rooms aboard The World.

http://aboardtheworld.com/experience

It's not exactly The Nautilus, but it's still a posh ship that's always voyaging somewhere.



-- Nephele
« Last Edit: September 24, 2012, 06:03:57 pm by Nephele » Logged
Captain
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« Reply #41 on: September 24, 2012, 06:59:19 pm »

I would have a suite of rooms aboard The World.

http://aboardtheworld.com/experience

It's not exactly The Nautilus, but it's still a posh ship that's always voyaging somewhere.



-- Nephele



Kudos.  That takes "live aboard" to a new extreme.  Any idea what the cost(s) would be?  

A steamier, if not necessarily better, option would be the Empress of the North: http://www.susanmilne.com/empress/index.htm   She is sort of a cursed ship after running aground a couple times, albeit with no serious injuries, and would probably go for a lot less than the original $50M if someone wanted to set it up like the M/V World.  Still even after I helped evacuate the passengers from Juneau (odd story that) I still cannot help being saddened by her just sitting somewhere unused. 



Birdsnest - I do not mean to be rude "cutting you off" by modifying a previous post.  It just seemed cleaner for the thread. 
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Birdnest
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« Reply #42 on: September 24, 2012, 07:05:07 pm »

I would have a suite of rooms aboard The World.

http://aboardtheworld.com/experience

It's not exactly The Nautilus, but it's still a posh ship that's always voyaging somewhere.



-- Nephele



Now there's a dream worth dreaming about ... uber rich wandering about on a yacht.   Grin
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Ada Thorold
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« Reply #43 on: September 24, 2012, 08:19:58 pm »

Birdnest: I can't claim to have designed any timber frames recently but I did make the tea for a local timber frame company for several summers, I am also an expert photocopier and a champion drawing folderer!

Apparently the black and white thing is a Victorian invention (to bring this thread full circle). They were always dark, very old oak and the bitumen used to preserve it will do that but they decided that they should be black. The infill isn't always white though, there's one near us which is a rather odd shade of salmon pink.

Nephele: The boat idea is lovely, unfortunately I get seasick. Though if it is a dream home I could always dream that I didn't...

~A~
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Angus A Fitziron
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« Reply #44 on: September 24, 2012, 08:58:40 pm »

Well, my choices are a liveaboard and a tent, neither of which are very popular at the moment. My third choice would be a tower of some sort, not an option. We have many water towers in England which would be a possibility.


For a tent, it would have to be a bell tent full of clever and luxurious campaign furniture, with a gazebo out back covering the field kitchen!



...or maybe a big bedouin tent...

As for a boat, it depends where I want to go. A narrowboat would be cool, there's a lot to see in Britain. Or maybe a cut down French peniche if I were to venture further.

Ahhh to dream!
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« Reply #45 on: September 25, 2012, 01:33:24 am »

Do you all really want me to add "Tower" to the options? 

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Maets
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« Reply #46 on: September 25, 2012, 01:49:00 am »

I do like towers.  Always wanted one as part of my house. May some day add one. Wanted one with a glass dome top so you could lay and watch the stars or be in a thunder storm.
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« Reply #47 on: September 25, 2012, 01:53:52 am »

Do you all really want me to add "Tower" to the options? 




Yes. Towers, windmills and lighthouses.
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von Corax
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« Reply #48 on: September 25, 2012, 02:26:35 am »

I do like towers.  Always wanted one as part of my house. May some day add one. Wanted one with a glass dome top so you could […] be in a thunder storm.

Damn you, Maets, get out of my head!
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #49 on: September 25, 2012, 03:23:42 am »

It must be one of his contraptions that allows him to listen in to your cranial Babbage engine
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