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Poll
Question: Do you have a "dream home," steamy or otherwise?
A classic Victorian house.
"Retro-modern" house.
Old Gothic church.
Remote cabin.
Old farmhouse.
A liveaboard boat.
An underground or cave house.
A castle/palace.
A small studio apartment.
An RV so I can travel to more SP cons.
An airship.
Gypsy wagon.
A tent.
A craftsman style house.
A tower (silo, windmill, lighthouse, ATC, etc...)
I have no dreams.
Microhome.  3/26/16

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Author Topic: POLL: Your (SP) Dream Home?  (Read 59177 times)
Camellia Wingnut
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United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands


Take my camel, dear. . . .


« Reply #150 on: May 02, 2013, 09:42:48 pm »

My Dear Admiral!
May it bring you solace to know how heartily your nostalgia and bewilderment are shared! (Scrap of cambric discreetly applied to eyes). I myself devoted much of my life to studies of an arcane nature, and achieved a Doctorate of Philosophy (the first of the fair sex to do so in my family). And all the while, as I researched reindeer gelding, moss nappies among the Yakut, and Siberian shamanism, everything else went to the dogs (Pardon the colloquialism). I emerged into a world where my beloved homes were lived in by others, and wretched obscurity and poverty were my lot. (Adds shot of tawny liquid to tea.)
The elder generation of our family also suffered tragically, and you are not alone in finding it difficult to endure (Stiff Upper Lip understatement.)
But I am still alive and, as you so rightly say, there is still Steam. (Utters feeble war cry: Steady the Buffs!)
Bye-the-bye, has anyone else discovered the Absolutely Thrilling Dream House described by Jules Verne in The Steam House: The Demon of Cawnpore and Tigers and Traitors? Two volumes. If only I possessed the technical skill to post the glorious etching of Behemoth, Steam Elephant, towing the two Pavilions through the jungle river! Do look (Google e-book, Free).

Yr Affct. Gt.-Aunt C.

Post Scriptum: Please do accept my assurances that the flippant tone of my remarks in no way casts aspersions upon their sincerity or yours. These are not joking matters.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2013, 10:01:13 pm by Camellia Wingnut » Logged

Take my camel, dear, said my aunt Camellia, climbing down from that animal on her return from high mass. The camel, a white Arabian Dhalur (single hump) from the famous herd of the Ruola tribe, had been a parting present, its saddle-bags stuffed with low-carat [sic] gold and flashy orient gems, from a rich desert tycoon. . . .
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #151 on: May 05, 2013, 12:21:54 am »

Dear Ms. Wingnut:

Don't worry, I'm having loads of fun taking virtual tours of my old hometown.  It is bittersweet after all.  It does make me want to return, if only to visit.

I wholeheartedly recommend taking a "Gogglemaps expedition" to your site of choice.  I took a "virtual drive" out of my neighbourhood into the city proper, and I dare to say I got lost twice just going to the west part of town.  I wanted to see if I could drive down there without looking at the street signs, just from visual memory using the 360 views and stopping periodically to see the landmarks and zoom out to a map view to learn the city streets/roads.  Some things I remember very well and others are confused in my mind.  Mind you I never drive in Mexico City as I was too young, yet I remember a good deal of the topography.  

It is remarkable how some things never change (except, perhaps the traffic- that looks worse, far worse).  But all the landmarks I remember are still there.  And a lot of other landmarks that were not there as well.  All mega-cities share something in common.  Some parts of the city are so similar to Tokyo.  Others look like Paris.  Not surprising given the scale of the city.

But the 360 views are breathtaking nonetheless (and some of the traffic rules are maddening to say the least!!  I think I crashed my car when trying to enter a rotunda in the wrong direction!! ).  As nasty as I remember that city to be in the usual sense for cities, it is also vastly more beautiful than I remember if that makes any sense.  Maybe I just took it for granted before.

Granted, I lived in the beautiful part of town, but the city proper is also so very developed and some of the modern buildings - which include a great many dating back to the 70's are very interesting. Architects are very cavalier in that country, and most construction is masonry based, even residential.

I may continue exploring as much as I can on my free time - if I find steamy landmarks worth mentioning I will post...  Many 19th C., 18th. C and even 16th.C. venues are still extant.  I may visit those.  I may open another thread dedicated to "virtual tours;" that might be interesting, though it will heavily contribute to my sappy rants, I'm afraid.

" Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts".
                                               -Mark Twain
          
« Last Edit: May 05, 2013, 12:51:14 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

nightspirit174
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« Reply #152 on: May 08, 2013, 07:05:27 pm »

I want an Victorian church in a cave, though that seems unlikely to find.  Undecided
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Captain
Zeppelin Captain
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United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


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« Reply #153 on: May 08, 2013, 08:13:56 pm »

I want an Victorian church in a cave, though that seems unlikely to find.  Undecided


Apparently churches in caves and caverns are not that rare. 



http://news.cheapflights.co.uk/top-10-fascinating-churches/

There are also old anchorite grottos which were fashionable in the gardens of wealthy nobles a century or three ago.

Many old churches also have catacombs - if you do not mind sharing your living space. 
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-Karl
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« Reply #154 on: May 09, 2013, 01:07:19 am »

I want an Victorian church in a cave, though that seems unlikely to find.  Undecided


Apparently churches in caves and caverns are not that rare.  



http://news.cheapflights.co.uk/top-10-fascinating-churches/


There are also old anchorite grottos which were fashionable in the gardens of wealthy nobles a century or three ago.

Many old churches also have catacombs - if you do not mind sharing your living space.  

I would say not unusual at all, probably inspired, given the history of Christianity in the late Roman Empire
« Last Edit: May 09, 2013, 07:12:12 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
nightspirit174
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« Reply #155 on: May 09, 2013, 01:36:30 pm »

Apparently churches in caves and caverns are not that rare. 



http://news.cheapflights.co.uk/top-10-fascinating-churches/

There are also old anchorite grottos which were fashionable in the gardens of wealthy nobles a century or three ago.

Many old churches also have catacombs - if you do not mind sharing your living space. 


Wow, that's stunning.  Shocked
I'm not sure about the one covered in skulls and bones though but some of the others are amazing as well.  Wink

I never thought there would be so many...
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Captain
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« Reply #156 on: May 09, 2013, 05:43:11 pm »

I am not sure that I would want the whole church in a cavern but pipe organ music could be really impressive in a cavern:  http://wosu.org/2012/classical101/worlds-largest-organ-can-be-found-underground/ 
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nightspirit174
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« Reply #157 on: May 09, 2013, 11:56:22 pm »

That sounds really beautiful, I'd be a little scared of them falling on me though.  Tongue
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #158 on: May 10, 2013, 08:17:47 am »

I wouldn't mind living in the "House on the Lake," which was a summer house built for President Porfirio Diaz in 1875, on the banks of the main lake of Chapultepec Forest in Mexico City (the equivalent of Central Park in New York City). Eventually it became part of the National University fine arts department (now named Juan Jose Arreola Hall , for those literary buffs among you).

(Warning: heavy CPU usage for virtual tours)
http://www.casadellago.unam.mx/site/tour/_flash/tour.html


Living at the Chapultepec Castle right next door, would be a tad much, and I'm not in love with the red wall paper and modern murals (as it is a museum now)...  The palace was built in the late 1700's for the Spanish Viceroy and then used by Emperor Iturbide (1821) right after Mexico's independence.  The palace survived two foreign invasions; it became a military academy prior to the Mexican-American War which saw a battle take place right there on the grounds of the castle in August 1847, and  later during the French intervention (1864-67), when the Mexican president Benito Juarez was in exile, and prince Maximilian I of Austria was invited to become 2nd emperor of Mexico by the nobility, this was the emperor's main residence...  it would later become a public building circa 1939 and became the National History Museum in 1944.

(Warning: heavy CPU usage for virtual tours)
http://www.inah.gob.mx/paseos/museonacional/

Museo Nacional de Historia, Castillo de Chapultepec.



This second video, below, is rather interesting for the way it begins (sorry for the Spanish- but you don't need to speak it just for the views);
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
El Foco - El Castillo de Chapultepec, 11 de Noviembre de 2012 por Proyecto 40






« Last Edit: May 15, 2013, 01:28:43 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Arabella Periscope
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Edwardian summer


« Reply #159 on: May 11, 2013, 01:20:24 am »

Beautiful little summerhouse.  And cave churches, very Phantom of the Opera.  I think I would like to live in the roof spaces of a cathedral, like the Hunchback of Notre Dame.  Salisbury, preferably.  It is wonderful up there; galleries of wooden arches and glass clerestories, all silent and hidden away, with incredible views.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #160 on: May 12, 2013, 01:34:11 am »

A more flamboyant example of a Baroque Revival private house built in the mid to late 1700's for the Spanish nobility in Mexico City;  La Casa de los Azulejos ("The House of Blue Tiles"), is now a restaurant and flagship store for the 1903-established department store Samborns


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Arabella Periscope
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Edwardian summer


« Reply #161 on: May 13, 2013, 10:05:08 pm »

Ah, yes, what about murals? In theory, any of us with the talent and the wherewithal for paint could create vast trompe l'oeil  vistas on the walls of our humble dwellings, of views from airship casements, adjoining laboratories that existed only in imagination, etc.,etc., the world outside as we would like to see it . . .
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #162 on: May 14, 2013, 08:11:05 am »

Ah, yes, what about murals? In theory, any of us with the talent and the wherewithal for paint could create vast trompe l'oeil  vistas on the walls of our humble dwellings, of views from airship casements, adjoining laboratories that existed only in imagination, etc.,etc., the world outside as we would like to see it . . .

Then I wont look much in Mexico City.  Ugh!  Unless you like socialistoid post-impressionist art by the likes of Diego Rivera, in which case you will find a lot of such art as murals by Rivera and many others...  

Nothing against Rivera (or dear Freda Kahlo for that matter) and his ideology - it's just that I hate that kind of art.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2013, 08:45:04 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Captain Lyerly
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« Reply #163 on: May 14, 2013, 05:01:57 pm »

J.W. - having lived for some years in Andalusia, I felt a serious surge of nostalgia when I saw los Azulejos.  Then, the interior picture reminded me very much of the Moroccan riyads, with the deep covered courtyard and the columns, with the Moorish lanterns as a great touch.  Beautiful.



Cheers!

Chas.
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Captain Sir Charles A. Lyerly, O.B.T.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #164 on: May 14, 2013, 08:33:32 pm »

J.W. - having lived for some years in Andalusia, I felt a serious surge of nostalgia when I saw los Azulejos.  Then, the interior picture reminded me very much of the Moroccan riyads, with the deep covered courtyard and the columns, with the Moorish lanterns as a great touch.  Beautiful.



Cheers!

Chas.


Indeed.  In Mexico you're never too far removed from the Moorish background of the Spanish architecture.

Those Spanish-style closed patios also lend themselves toward interesting 19th. C, adaptations of Neo-Baroque architecture, and I'm sure you'll recognise the practice of making glass ceilings and domes as a 19th. C. influence.  Look at the ceiling of the historic Monte Piedad pawn shop in Mexico City (yes- that's a pawn shop.  Also located inside what used to be a private house):



A closer look at the interior of La Casa de los Azulejos I had shown in a previous post:

A close up of the interior fountain; Image Creative Commons 2009 AlejandroLinaresGarcia (you can right click to zoom in)

some stunning images of the same house
http://images.quickblogcast.com/1/0/9/7/5/167774-157901/la_Casa_de_los_Azulejos_21.jpg

These are Azulejos.  Cobalt blue on white ceramic tiles.  A cultural import throughout the ages;  China (First Century AD?)--> Middle East (Early Middle Ages)--->Spain (Middle Age) and Netherlands (1519- 1581 when the Austria, the Netherlands and Spain were joined politically under the Holy Roman Empire headed by Charles V of Hapsburg).
I don't have pictures of the interior of my house, but I had tile for the entire kitchen in my house in Mexico (http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,37460.msg850159.html#msg850159) - modern as it was.  The kitchen was covered in hand painted cobalt blue and white tile.  We kept a simple pattern, more Mexican than Spanish (exact pattern shown below), because we realised this would be a perfect match...  You see, all the dishware was cobalt blue and white to match. This was cheap stuff, mind, you, the kind you could get at local retail shops - heck, even the local supermarket carried some items like plates and cups.

and the glassware blue glass as well.
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Most of it has not survived the years and the move to the States, sadly. I have to mail order some from Mexico again from their catalogue, I guess...  ( I hear Pottery Barn carries some -hopefully not at overblown prices...)
http://www.anfora.com.mx/
« Last Edit: May 15, 2013, 07:49:46 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #165 on: May 14, 2013, 10:11:25 pm »

And just for kicks, I found this picture of a social event held by the Automobile Club in 1910 at the "House on the Lake, pictured above...
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Captain
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« Reply #166 on: July 12, 2013, 07:16:39 pm »

A thread covering steaming a liveaboard sail boat.  http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,40628.0.html
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Teqe
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« Reply #167 on: July 14, 2013, 08:32:27 pm »

A thread covering steaming a liveaboard sail boat.  http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,40628.0.html


This is pretty awesome.
A wooden craft is the only way to go when it comes to boats. If you don't get a wooden vessel, you better get a catamaran.

I'm really happy you linked this, I was not aware of the 40 Kettenburg and they are pretty inexpensive it seems.
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As Crows Fly
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« Reply #168 on: July 16, 2013, 10:04:12 pm »

A thread covering steaming a liveaboard sail boat.  http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,40628.0.html


This is pretty awesome.
A wooden craft is the only way to go when it comes to boats. If you don't get a wooden vessel, you better get a catamaran.

I'm really happy you linked this, I was not aware of the 40 Kettenburg and they are pretty inexpensive it seems.


After "which is the best bear defense gun to carry?" probably the next most common and endless argument in Alaska is wood hulled boats.   Wink  I have seen some nice catamarans and trimarans here but these motor-sailers are becoming very popular and seem to have more steamy potential. 


The Sally
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Wormster
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« Reply #169 on: July 16, 2013, 10:33:05 pm »


The Sally


That hull/deckhouse shape reminds me of a Dhow, as to the best gun to carry for self defence - only one contender - AK47!
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Captain
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The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


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« Reply #170 on: July 17, 2013, 06:27:10 pm »


The Sally


That hull/deckhouse shape reminds me of a Dhow, as to the best gun to carry for self defence - only one contender - AK47!


Talking about Uncle Joe's little gun here might get us chastised.  Besides the Saiga 12ga version is the only one worth carrying here.   Wink

I admit to a weakness for trimarans.  There used to be a nice 42' harbored here named the Mithandra.

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Captain Lyerly
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« Reply #171 on: July 17, 2013, 09:09:41 pm »

"Boat, n.  A hole in the water surrounded by wood, fiberglass, or metal, into which one pours money."

The Sally reminds me of a Turkish Gulet; Karl, do you have any further info on her?



Cheers!

Chas.
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Captain
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United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


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« Reply #172 on: July 26, 2013, 03:42:14 pm »

"Boat, n.  A hole in the water surrounded by wood, fiberglass, or metal, into which one pours money."

The Sally reminds me of a Turkish Gulet; Karl, do you have any further info on her?



Cheers!

Chas.


Sorry but all that I can find is that she apparently sailed through the Juneau area at some point.  We did visit another boat (three actually) while out of town last week:  http://www.thesteampunkempire.com/photo/album/show?id=2442691%3AAlbum%3A1587633&xg_source=activity
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Captain Lyerly
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Ukraine Ukraine


At the helm of the Frumious Bandersnatch


« Reply #173 on: July 26, 2013, 07:43:37 pm »

What would you do for a Klondike? Grin


I am still (intermittently) continuing my search for a good steel hull on which to build a gentleman's Edwardian-style saloon launch, something along these lines:



I may have found something appropriate, but I need to do more research.


Cheers!

Chas.


 
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Arabella Periscope
Zeppelin Captain
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United States United States


Edwardian summer


« Reply #174 on: July 27, 2013, 01:24:48 am »

Oh, how beautiful.
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