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Author Topic: the next thing I need to learn about painting plastic is....  (Read 1534 times)
Professor J. Cogsworthy
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« on: June 29, 2012, 01:01:21 am »

I've been playing around painting cheap squirt guns to practice
drybrushing.

Here are a couple ( the others have been given away before I
remembered I didn't take pictures....



( the gold one is not quite finished yet )

I'm pretty happy with how they look as far as what I have learned to do
up to this point( but they are more scifi than steampunk.... )

What do I need to learn next?
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Vox Cerae
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« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2012, 01:57:14 am »

I would suggest learning to sew, if you don't know already. Making a leather holster for your armaments just really brings it together.
If you are talking about the guns themselves, you could go to model painting sites and look how to layer the paint in a way that "adds" rust spots. I've done it, not on a gun, but an actual car model. It looks fairly decent and gives a nice effect. Also playing with the thickness of the paint you're using could be interesting to differentiate the way light is thrown off in areas.
...Or glue random tidbits on it!  Wink
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Herbert West
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« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2012, 03:23:31 am »

Looks like you're off to a good start!

I'd pick up some brown and black craft paint and add a bit of dirt and crime to the corners and crevices. Also, maybe get some sandpaper and go over the grips and other parts that see a lot of heavy handling to simulate wear on the paint. Weathering can add a lot of interest to an already good looking design.

If you want to get really fancy, pick up more varieties of metallic paint. Brass, silver, copper, and gold. Or even different brands of the same colors. Then use masking tape to mask and paint various parts of the weapons different shades. It'll make it look like it was constructed of different parts rather than molded in one piece.

Keep it up though man. You're off to a fine start.
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Captain Brandsson
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« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2012, 06:23:57 pm »

Good work on the paint.
Sewing and/or leatherwork seem like the logical next step.

However, I am moving on to woodworking (logic be blasted).
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- Maximilian
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« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2012, 07:23:43 pm »

I'd suggest having a go at using a number of tonal varieties of the same colour to produce blended shading on curved surfaces. Going from a dark tone to a light one from a corner or a recess out on to a flat/exposed area makes for a better effect of depth/ modeling than you can get with just drybrushing alone. It's good practice in brush control too.



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The Dan Keizer
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« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2012, 07:10:50 pm »

I work at a job where I occasionally have to paint fake rocks and bricks in order to make them look more realistic and weathered.  The layman would think that natural lighting would shine on all the little niches and cracks and crannies and such and the natural shading would give it accents, but it doesn't really look right.  You have to get a little darker color into all those little details.

What we do, and what I think would be easiest for you to do, is paint whatever we are working on its primary base color (which would be gold for example on your gun up there).  Then we take a black or near-black water based paint and further water it down and paint all the parts that have details.

Then you simply take a rag or a sponge and (lightly!) wipe the whole piece off, removing the dark color.  This wiping will remove the dark paint from your gold faces, but leave the darker color in all of your little fine details.

It is really very easy, and you have already done the hard work.  The handle on that gold gun looks like it will really pop and look great once you do it, and it's a good spot to test your skill.  Just dab some watery black onto the ridges on that handle, then immediately wipe it off.  Let it dry.  You will be impressed with your own handiwork and see how easy it is.
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Professor J. Cogsworthy
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Aude Aliquid Dignum


« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2012, 08:02:48 pm »

I work at a job where I occasionally have to paint fake rocks and bricks in order to make them look more realistic and weathered.  The layman would think that natural lighting would shine on all the little niches and cracks and crannies and such and the natural shading would give it accents, but it doesn't really look right.  You have to get a little darker color into all those little details.

What we do, and what I think would be easiest for you to do, is paint whatever we are working on its primary base color (which would be gold for example on your gun up there).  Then we take a black or near-black water based paint and further water it down and paint all the parts that have details.

Then you simply take a rag or a sponge and (lightly!) wipe the whole piece off, removing the dark color.  This wiping will remove the dark paint from your gold faces, but leave the darker color in all of your little fine details.

It is really very easy, and you have already done the hard work.  The handle on that gold gun looks like it will really pop and look great once you do it, and it's a good spot to test your skill.  Just dab some watery black onto the ridges on that handle, then immediately wipe it off.  Let it dry.  You will be impressed with your own handiwork and see how easy it is.

The gold gun has not had anymore work done since the photo.... I think I will try a wash on that one.

Maybe a brown paint?
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The Dan Keizer
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« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2012, 09:55:52 pm »

Make it a dark brown, whatever color you want the "wear" on it to be.
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Jedediah Solomon
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« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2012, 08:08:21 pm »

I have been successful in making plastic look like leather, by using an aerosol can of "Rocker-guard" paint. It comes in tan or black, and may have more colours available these days, but I am not sure. It is available in Automotive supply stores and it is normally used to cover up bodywork repairs on the lower portion under the doors, DO NOT GET THE TAR-LIKE product, such as undercoating. (There is practically no purpose for that, except hiding bodywork UNDER a car. Can't even paint the stuff and it stinks.) Clean the part with alcohol andd let it dry thoroughly. Give a single coat of rocker-guard paint, and let it dry. Then paint it the colour you want. I have even made fake seams on larger pieces by placing a string over the surface and pulling it tight. Then I remove the string after the paint gets tacky, and put "stitches" along side the line left by the string with a star-wheel. It worked, but a part of it was messed up.So, I glued some gears on it and called it steampunk!
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zilegil
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« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2012, 08:21:54 am »

Sorry for the threadromancy. Just here's one of the better paint companies. There are a few others that compare but this is the one with the widest range (if not the finest paint).

http://usshop.thearmypainter.com/index.php

As for metallics, these are quite hard to use and pricy but they look absolutely amazing.

http://www.acrylicosvallejo.com/en_US/liquid-gold/family/11

A few other things is that airbrushes are absolutely amazing for this sort of thing. They are very good for blending. If you get one though, do a lot of research and splash out if you want your money's worth.

Plus you can powder red chalk and varnish it on to metals to make it look rusty. You can also buy weathering powders that apparently look very nice but they aren't vitally important. Art sponges cut to shape can make similar effects, not quite as good as powdering chalk though.

Hope I help.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2012, 08:24:16 am by zilegil » Logged

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Fat Spider
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« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2012, 12:41:59 am »

I hate to introduce commercialism to a thread Grin but I can also recommend the Army Painter range, the washes are superb: www.fatspider.co.uk just look in the Menu for Army Painter Cool.

Now I also have to admit that Vallejo paints are also very good but I don't stock them :'(

Now after the shameless plug I have to say I think the best way to paint metallics is to start with a black undercoat and build up the finish with successive layers of  drybrushing with a VERY dry brush, it's time consuming and wastes a lot of paint but the results can be stunning.
 
The easy way out of course is basecoat with the chosen metallic colour and then wash followed by a very light drybrush to bring out the highlights.
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Angus A Fitziron
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« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2012, 09:42:25 am »

This is a really useful thread. I seem to recall reading in military modelling magazines of the 'hairspray' technique, which allows you to produce a chipped effect in paint. I think this would be useful for a well used item that is subject to wear and tear on a painted or plated surface. I must find time to experiment!

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zilegil
Officer
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« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2012, 01:02:23 pm »

ah, yes. I haven't used it personally I read about it often. This bloke uses it quite a lot to amazing effect. He also has some good techniques for cracked paint.

http://www.dakkadakka.com/dakkaforum/posts/list/0/314661.page
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Wilhelm Smydle
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« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2012, 11:13:11 pm »

A lot of painting techniques can be found at local model shops.
Many shops have classes, workshops, or project nights.
Locally games workshop runs one every week.
The paints seam a little over priced but its a good resource for tactile learners.
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zilegil
Officer
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #14 on: October 17, 2012, 08:51:17 am »

GW paints are a touch over priced but they are a wonderful quality paint brand. If you're painting water pistols you could live with some watered down Acrylic from an art shop though.
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