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Author Topic: Victorian food brands still extant  (Read 189599 times)
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #750 on: June 03, 2015, 10:16:07 am »

I bought one of the Dickinson and Morris 1851 Melton Mowbray pork pies this morning, I'm eating it now.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #751 on: June 03, 2015, 11:18:44 am »

with some HP sauce 1895...
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« Reply #752 on: June 08, 2015, 03:34:22 am »

Roberts Bakery 1887
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« Reply #753 on: June 11, 2015, 11:43:54 pm »

Fox's Biscuits 1853 - brandy snaps and custard cremes
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #754 on: June 13, 2015, 06:25:52 am »

I may have found another one for the Japanese list at my local super.  It almost seems like boasting, but it looks their product goes back to the 1600s.

Marukan Rice Vinegar (Originally founded in 1649 by Yasutsugu Hanzaemon Okada in Kiyosu, Aichi Prefecture, Japan)

http://www.marukan-usa.com/history.php

The current trademark (central logo as shown) was registered in 1885 during the Meiji Period


Quote
In the Tokugawa Era there was a saying that ”Masamune means Sake and Marukan means vinegar,”and as a guarantee of the unfailing quality of Marukan vinegar, the name of the company’s founder, Suya Kanzaburo (Yasuhisa) was written on every barrel of vinegar produced. ... right up to the present day this trademark Marukan Trademark has continued to stand as a guarantee of our traditional skill and constant high quality


1649 Company was established, Yasutsugu Hanzaemon Okada started producing refined vinegar in Kiyosu, Aichi Prefecture.
1675 His eldest son, Kanzaburo Yasuhisa, moved the business to Fushimicho in Nagoya, and the present trademark was adopted.
1743 Kanzaburo was adopted from the Okada family into the Sasada family, and started production of refined vinegar in Fukuromachi, Nagoya.
1816 Okada family was combined with the Sasada family, and the third generation Denzaemon Sasada became head of the business.
1885
Trademark was registered in order to company with the new Trademark Act.
1893 Japan head office and factory was established in Kobe.
1908 Appointed purveyors to the Imperial Household.
1914 Established Sasada Shoten Co., Ltd.
1941 Tokyo factory newly constructed.
1945 Company's entire facilities destroyed by boming during WWII.
1949 Company incorporated as Sasada Shoten.
1950 Absorbed Nihon Shinshiki Brewing Co., Ltd.
1953 Nagoya factory newly constructed.
1961 Company's name changed to Marukan Vinegar Co., Ltd.
U.S. 1974 Los Angeles branch established.
U.S. 1975 Marukan Vinegar(U.S.A.) Inc., established.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2015, 06:35:44 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #755 on: June 13, 2015, 09:20:02 am »

Japan has tens if not hundreds of companies dating back to the 1600s

« Last Edit: June 13, 2015, 09:27:53 am by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #756 on: June 15, 2015, 06:29:55 am »

Japan has tens if not hundreds of companies dating back to the 1600s



The interesting thing to me is what happened when the Meiji Period began and the trademarks began to be registered in the Western styke, so to speak and Western industrialisation and marketing practices begin.  It is during that period that you get true Steampunk potential.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #757 on: June 15, 2015, 10:41:34 am »

I almost bought a bottle of A1 steak sauce today. A brand of sauce that originated in Britain (1831), made its way across the Atlantic and stayed there. Disappeared from UK shelves decades ago and the only time we see it here is when it is imported. I picked up the bottle and saw the compulsory EU extra information label and saw: "contains genetically modified ingredients".

I put it back.

If it had said "May contain traces of nuts and small amounts of uranium" - it would be no more off-putting.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2015, 09:04:32 am by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #758 on: June 15, 2015, 11:11:53 am »

I almost bought a bottle of A1 steak sauce today. A brand of sauce that originated in Britain, made its way across the Atlantic and stayed there. Disappeared from UK shelves decades ago and the only time we see it here is when it is imported. I picked up the bottle and saw the compulsory EU extra information label and saw: "contains genetically modified ingredients".

I put it back.

If it had said "May contain traces of nuts and small amounts of uranium" - it would be no more off-putting.

Tell me about it.  I'm not that scared about the genetically modified food as you may be , especially in light of my poverty and the things I have to eat to stay alive.

*scratches back with third arm*

Having said that there is a trend to ruin old venerable recipes.  After finding my favourite Mexican Mole sauce on American super shelves (a type of sauce paste sold in glass jars and a sort of 20th C. staple down in Mexico), I noticed that one year ago the jars bore the Nestle logo.  Joy that after many years, I could indulge in the "instant" version of the sauce (the real thing will take one whole day to make by hand).  The particular version of sauce I longed for was the "Poblano" style mole.

Upon reading  the label I noticed one crucial ingredient was missing... Most mole sauces are made with pumpkin seeds and various nuts plus roasted chili powder, and in the particular case of Poblano Mole chocolate is one of the the main ingredients.

Well it just happens that the Nestle version now has substituted chocolate for artificial flavour and - get this - pulverised biscuits.  Why not add coffee grinds while you're at it!?  What a way to ruin the traditional taste of a food staple.

Nestle pulled the exact same stunt on a Mexican / Spanish type of un-emulsified table (hot) chocolate ("Abuelita brand - one of two major makers of this type), which by the way happens to be one of the oldest-ever if not the oldest recipe for chocolate proper (cocoa with sugar) as developed in the New Spain after the Conquest, and which uses cocoa, sugar, almonds and cinnamon.  

So Nestle did away with the cinnamon and the almonds -at least in their American version of it.  What rubbish! Mexico is famous for being a major producer of the Chinese Cassia Cinnamon or "false" cinnamon that is sold around the world, which is a substitute for the more rare middle eastern Cinnamomum verum aka "canela," or "true cinnamon."  Well, apparently Mexican cinnamon is not cheap enough for Nestle and they decided to replace it with artificial flavours.  

Why?  Why in the name of God do they do away with such a simple and inexpensive recipe and replace it with a chemical? It didn't make their product any less expensive nor did it improve the taste.  Messing with such a historically significant recipe is criminal in my opinion.

EDIT:

I say we find the Nestle people responsible for the changes and we deal with them as the old Mexica would have on the Pyramid of the Sun

« Last Edit: June 15, 2015, 11:40:11 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #759 on: June 15, 2015, 11:46:31 am »

"Appropriate quality..."
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RJBowman
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« Reply #760 on: June 15, 2015, 04:04:10 pm »

I recently saw an article reporting that Taco Bell is going to stop using imitation black pepper flavor in their taco meat. How cheap do you have to be to use imitation black pepper flavoring?

As for GMO ingredients; they don't bother me. There hasn't been a study from any credible source that showed that there is any problem with it. A-1's GMO warning is precautionary anyway; they buy their ingredients on the commodities market, so they can't really be 100% certain of where the stuff came from, which is pretty much how it is for most food manufactured on an industrial scale. And every food product made in America has some kind of nut, soy, or gluten warning on it as a defense against nuisance lawsuits.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #761 on: June 15, 2015, 04:28:04 pm »

Luckily at the moment - we don't have any of that stuff over here but it is coming.
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« Reply #762 on: June 25, 2015, 04:07:32 am »

Speaking of procrastinating, I really must get the Canadian list up to date.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #763 on: June 25, 2015, 09:09:00 am »

Canadian list: good!

A1 steak (1831), "contains genetically modified ingredients" - this not only worries me but also smacks of low quality, the desire to reduce price for maximum profit rather than quality for the consumer. This is particularly prevalent in bulk brands where they will use advertising rather than quality to sell their product. A necessary evil.

At the time the food brands were trusted as being of a good quality where food staples bought on the street might be adulterated.
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von Corax
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« Reply #764 on: June 25, 2015, 06:07:10 pm »

It depends on how anal-retentive your labelling regulations are. I have a bottle of Canadian A1 that contains "modified corn starch," which could have been made from BT corn, which harbours a bacterium that protects the plant from cutworm, and I think the BT strains are a genetic modification.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #765 on: June 25, 2015, 07:03:29 pm »

I'm only slightly anal, the word modified makes you think it is nasty but modified corn starch isn't genetically modified, it has just undergone a chemical change.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2015, 07:05:06 pm by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged
von Corax
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« Reply #766 on: June 25, 2015, 07:14:17 pm »

No, I realize the starch is chemically modified; my point is that the corn/maize/whatever plant might have been genetically modified with the BT gene. That might be enough for Brussels to decree that it must be labelled.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2015, 07:17:08 pm by von Corax » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #767 on: June 25, 2015, 07:54:07 pm »

I wouldn't exclude a brand due to genetic modification as that is little removed from breeding a new species by cross-pollination or mutation.  But read the following:


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breyers
Quote
History[edit]

Breyer ice cream truck, circa 1915
In 1866 William A. Breyer began to produce and sell "iced cream" in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, first from his home, and later via horse and wagon on the streets. Breyer’s son Henry incorporated the business in 1908. The formerly independent Breyer Ice Cream Company was sold to the National Dairy Products Corporation in 1926; National Dairy changed its name to Kraftco in 1969, and Kraft by 1975. Kraft sold its ice cream brands to Unilever in 1993, while retaining the rights to the name for yogurt products.[2]

Cost-cutting[edit]
Prior to 2006,[3] Breyers was known for producing ice cream with a small number of all-natural ingredients. In recent years, as part of cost-cutting measures since their move from Green Bay, Wisconsin to Unilever's U.S. headquarters in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey,[4] Unilever has reformulated many of its flavors with nontraditional, additive ingredients, significantly changing the taste and texture of their desserts as a result.[3] Following similar practices by several of their competitors, and to the consternation of many former customers,[3] Breyers' list of ingredients has expanded to include natural food additives such as tara gum[5] and carob bean gum,[6] artificial additives such as maltodextrin and propylene glycol,[7] and common artificially separated and extracted ingredients such as corn syrup, whey, and others.[6][7]
One result of these cost-cutting practices has been that many of Breyer's U.S. products no longer contain enough milk and cream to be considered "ice cream", and are now labeled "Frozen Dairy Dessert",[8] or "Frozen Dessert" in Canada.[9][10]
For several decades over 30% of Breyers products, including most of its products sold in the northeastern U.S., were produced in a large plant outside Boston, in Framingham, Massachusetts. As part of cost-cutting by Unilever, the plant was closed in March 2011.

These are the kinds of things which will make me exclude a brand from the list.  
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RJBowman
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« Reply #768 on: June 25, 2015, 07:55:12 pm »

If people that are afraid of GMO's are going to not eat anything with the word "modified" in the ingredients, then the food processing industry is going to have to discontinue half their products.
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #769 on: June 25, 2015, 08:43:52 pm »

Perhaps in the US.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #770 on: June 25, 2015, 10:00:57 pm »

I suspect that Modified Food Starch is not a uniquely American ingredient.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #771 on: July 14, 2015, 02:28:17 am »

I'm at my local super now, and I stumbled upon these imported pastry brands:

Lambertz bakery 1688 Germany

Le Clerc 1905  Canada

Im sure we had already talked about Hellema, but I'm not sure about these two.  Perhaps someone can do the research while I walk home?
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« Reply #772 on: July 14, 2015, 03:36:57 am »

Le Clerc 1905  Canada
Hadn't heard of them before, but I shall keep an eye open now.

If all else fails, I shall ask my nephew to bring me a sample when he visits next month.

PS: It's not "Le Clerc," it's "Leclerc." Apparently.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #773 on: July 14, 2015, 03:42:46 am »

Le Clerc 1905  Canada

Hadn't heard of them before, but I shall keep an eye open now.

If all else fails, I shall ask my nephew to bring me a sample when he visits next month.

PS: It's not "Le Clerc," it's "Leclerc." Apparently.


This is the history of Leclerc.  It was founded in Quebec City by François Leclerc:
http://www.leclerc.ca/en/history/default.idigit
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #774 on: July 15, 2015, 10:06:45 am »

Modified Food Starch is not a problem as an ingredient as modified in this case does not mean it contains GM.

That Canadian brand might just apply to the UK list , will have to check!
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