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Author Topic: Victorian food brands still extant  (Read 115030 times)
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #1150 on: August 23, 2017, 08:05:00 pm »

I'd be willing to bet those are very, very tasty. "Deliciously indulgent biscuits" is their motto. I think that sums up that little biscuit-related detour. Let us put the biscuits and their tins to bed now.

I claim cookies or deliciously indulgent biscuits for the Empire.
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« Reply #1151 on: August 24, 2017, 06:43:49 am »

The American style cookies which are marketed to women on this side of the pond as "small batch old fashioned gourmet cookies" in supermakets belong to the Pepperidge Farms brand (not Victorian era). They look like they were baked in the "Little House on the Prarie" by Ms. Laura Ingalls herself. You can smell the cast iron firewood oven and stove.

https://www.pepperidgefarm.com/our-story/






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« Reply #1152 on: September 10, 2017, 10:58:57 pm »

Uncle Bert, how is your quest going...re:- Whittar's Chocolate bars?
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« Reply #1153 on: September 10, 2017, 11:39:00 pm »

Just one of those tasks I aqm trying to complete. I'm currently standing in a pile of my own excrement, looking for a shovel (metaphorically).
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1154 on: September 10, 2017, 11:51:10 pm »

Just one of those tasks I aqm trying to complete. I'm currently standing in a pile of my own excrement, looking for a shovel (metaphorically).

Then may I suggest another (non food) Victorian Era brand:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scott_Paper_Company
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« Reply #1155 on: September 21, 2017, 12:35:44 am »

For the U. S., has anyone mentioned Monarch Mustard (established 1853)?  It is currently distributed by US FOODS, INC, of Rosemont, IL.
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« Reply #1156 on: September 21, 2017, 06:31:26 pm »

For the U. S., has anyone mentioned Monarch Mustard (established 1853)?  It is currently distributed by US FOODS, INC, of Rosemont, IL.

I've never heard of it, but it looks it started in the 1850s,as a gold rush supply company. Mustard would certainly be an early product, but I'd be interested to know which other foods they sold. Certainly as a pioneer supplier, you'd see things like flour and other staples (all of which may not have survived)...
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« Reply #1157 on: September 22, 2017, 07:57:21 am »

For the British list, what can you tell me on  the following brands? Twinings, Typhoo, McVitie's, Robinson's, Sarson's? At a local super here in Austin.

Also, are they included?


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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #1158 on: September 22, 2017, 02:19:11 pm »

Oh yes.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1159 on: September 24, 2017, 03:06:44 am »

Oh yes.
Or rather, were they in the updated list?
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #1160 on: September 24, 2017, 01:13:59 pm »

I'm certain they are in the updated list - ie. the list!
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« Reply #1161 on: October 04, 2017, 07:28:36 am »

What about Bird's Powdered Custard?

Quote
Bird's Custard was first formulated and first cooked by Alfred Bird in 1837 at his chemist shop in Birmingham.[1] He developed the recipe because his wife was allergic to eggs,[2] the key ingredient used to thicken traditional custard. The Birds continued to serve real custard to dinner guests, until one evening when the egg-free custard was served instead, either by accident or design. The dessert was so well received by the other diners that Alfred Bird put the recipe into wider production.



And Crawford's?

« Last Edit: October 04, 2017, 07:31:47 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #1162 on: October 04, 2017, 01:59:38 pm »

Birds we have, though I hate the stuff! Cornflour, yellow colouring and vanilla essence. Not 'real' custard'. Makes a nice ooblick though. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BN2D5y-AxIY

Garibaldi we have already, though Crawfords we might not... will check the list and amend if needed.

Garibaldi biscuits were staple army biscuits up until recently, known in the army simply as biscuits, fruit. The civilian population generally know them as squashed-fly biscuits.
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« Reply #1163 on: October 04, 2017, 06:20:54 pm »

Garibaldi biscuits were staple army biscuits up until recently, known in the army simply as biscuits, fruit. The civilian population generally know them as squashed-fly biscuits.

Cockroach sandwiches eh?  Wink Cheesy yes they look a bit dishevelled. No one said Victorian inventions had to look appetizing.





« Last Edit: October 04, 2017, 06:23:08 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #1164 on: October 05, 2017, 01:26:40 am »

They are exceedingly tasty and more-ish.
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« Reply #1165 on: October 05, 2017, 06:38:19 pm »

They are exceedingly tasty and more-ish.

Let's see what else I can find at my local super. Since I moved to a new shop closer to downtown I have access to different supermarkets. This one has a lot more international items. I can finally compare a British Mars Bar to the American Mars products  Roll Eyes The selection is for the benefit of the university students.

I'm sure a few of the brands outside of the UK ones above will also end up being Victorian, especially the European and Asian brands. Who knows? I might even discover a few more Mexican brands. Thankfully I have a camera on my phone now.

 Very surprised how intense the cultural incursion is even in seasonal Halloween items (Day of the Dead)

« Last Edit: October 05, 2017, 06:40:33 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #1166 on: October 05, 2017, 07:42:23 pm »

Garibaldi biscuits are a type of biscuit, McFarlane and Lang Garibaldi biscuits - we have those on the list already but each manufacturer makes them differently. Some thicker and less baked, some thinner and more crunchy. All quite tasty, some more so.

I can certainly add Crawford's biscuits to the list, they will have some unique types to celebrate (ie. eat)

When you decide to eat any of that British stuff contact me first and I'll tell you how and when to eat it in order to get the best from it. Marmite is a typical example where prior tuition is REQUIRED.

It is amazing how you find foreigners on yo'tube trying food and eating it the wrong way.

Strange how the Americans think we the Brits eat tea and crumpets. They might even try. We never eat tea and crumpets together at the same meal, we might by coincidence but it would never be ordered together in the same breath. The two things simply have no connection. Like bubble gum and carrots, they are merely two things a human can eat.

A Crumpet is best eaten toasted with lots of salted butter, possibly with Marmite and cheese. What we would call a crumpet would be surprising to an American who frankly, has no idea what it actually is. They would assume it is a sweet cake and it isn't, it is a heavily raised, savoury, half-baked bread that cannot be eaten uncooked.

It is nice to hear Americans state "tea and crumpets" as it always shows how lacking in knowledge they really are about the food and habits of this part of the world (not all but most) and judging how real Chinese respond when they see American Chinese-style food, how little they know the rest of the world's food too.

We have the same limitations with regard to Chinese food no doubt.


« Last Edit: October 05, 2017, 07:45:46 pm by yereverluvinunclebert » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1167 on: October 05, 2017, 08:13:57 pm »

Garibaldi biscuits are a type of biscuit, McFarlane and Lang Garibaldi biscuits - we have those on the list already but each manufacturer makes them differently. Some thicker and less baked, some thinner and more crunchy. All quite tasty, some more so.

I can certainly add Crawford's biscuits to the list, they will have some unique types to celebrate (ie. eat)

When you decide to eat any of that British stuff contact me first and I'll tell you how and when to eat it in order to get the best from it. Marmite is a typical example where prior tuition is REQUIRED.

It is amazing how you find foreigners on yotube trying food and eating it the wrong way.

Strange how the Americans think we the Brits eat tea and crumpets. They might even try. We never eat tea and crumpets together at the same meal, we might by coincidence but ti would never be ordered together in the same breath. The two things simply have no connection. Like bubble gum and carrots, they are merely two things a human can eat.

A Crumpet is best eaten toasted with lots of salted butter. What we would call a crumpet would be surprising to an American who frankly, has no idea what it actually is. They would assume it is a cake and it isn't, it is a heavily raised, savoury, half-baked bread that cannot be eaten uncooked.

It is nice to hear Americans state "tea and crumpets" as it always shows how lacking in knowledge they really are about the food and habits of the rest of the world (not all but most).




Ha, ha! I think the "Tea and Crumpets" thing is just mentioned because that sounds "foreign," no other reason. I doubt many Americans in the street even know what a crumpet is  Grin

It's hard to pass judgment on Americans as many people in the world don't even know what real Mexican food is. When I was in college I had a real heated argument with a Canadian student, because when I told him that Burritos were American not Mexican (like the Taco is) he wouldn't believe it. He started to bring more and more people into the argument : "would you BELIEVE this guy says Burritos ARE NOT Mexican? I guess in the heat of the moment he forgot that I was raised in Mexico (In the same period I had an even worse argument with one or two other US students when I told them that I had French and Italian people in my family, and that there were large numbers of non Spanish Europeans in Mexico - because apparently that is a *physical impossibility* to Americans).

It boils down to education or lack thereof.
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« Reply #1168 on: October 05, 2017, 08:34:46 pm »

As to what a crumpet is, for inquiring minds, read this below. The English version is basically a thick small savory griddle cake, typically garnished with savory/salty ingredients. The Scottish version being larger and much thinner resembles American pancakes a lot more.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crumpet
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yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #1169 on: October 06, 2017, 12:04:20 am »

Time for some Mexican real food.
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Banfili
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« Reply #1170 on: October 06, 2017, 01:03:23 am »

Crumpets can be eaten with savoury toppings, but also with sweet toppings! Down under, for a sweet-ish treat they can be topped with butter (salted, of course!) then jam or honey, which add a lovely counter-balance to the non-sweet crumpet. Or for a non-sweet change, Vegemite. Down here they can also be used as a base for a mini-pizza - you would be surprised at just how nice they are! First you toast, then add you favourite pizza toppings and bake till done. Good for children's pizza, as they are not too big!
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1171 on: October 06, 2017, 03:59:28 am »

Crumpets can be eaten with savoury toppings, but also with sweet toppings! Down under, for a sweet-ish treat they can be topped with butter (salted, of course!) then jam or honey, which add a lovely counter-balance to the non-sweet crumpet. Or for a non-sweet change, Vegemite. Down here they can also be used as a base for a mini-pizza - you would be surprised at just how nice they are! First you toast, then add you favourite pizza toppings and bake till done. Good for children's pizza, as they are not too big!
The savoury and sweet alternatives you speak of are not dissimilar to the use of the American "Biscuit" which is basically a scone-like soda bread, which you can top with savoury items (eg gravy), butter, and or sweets like fruit preserves. Making a sandwich with eggs and bacon is also a common way to eat it (fast food)

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biscuit_(bread)
« Last Edit: October 06, 2017, 09:48:08 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #1172 on: October 06, 2017, 09:14:11 am »

Crumpets can be eaten with savoury toppings, but also with sweet toppings!

We have long accepted the food excesses of our closely related Antipodean brothers but it doesn't mean we can accept these deviations from the true norm. Sweetness on crumpets, gah!
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Banfili
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« Reply #1173 on: October 06, 2017, 10:37:05 am »

unclebert, spoken by one who hasn't tasted the pleasure of crumpets and honey - the melted butter and honey mix oozing through the lovely hot, toasted crumpet - bliss!
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1174 on: October 06, 2017, 09:56:52 pm »

That's right! You know you want it. Turn to the dark side.... For an even more unholy union, combine sweet and savoury. Mwahahaha!



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