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Author Topic: Steampunk Coffin.  (Read 3105 times)
SPBrewer
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« Reply #25 on: March 21, 2012, 11:31:40 pm »

I believe it was Aimee Semple MacPherson who had a live telephone entombed with her.

I wonder how long someone paid the bills on that...  and what the long-distance tolls were.

Hmmm

Chas.

Talk about NOT resting in Peace! 
Can you imagine how much the phone would ring with telemarketers?  Smiley
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« Reply #26 on: March 21, 2012, 11:46:05 pm »

R.I.P = Resting In Phonebooth?

I saw disturbing footage on Myth Busters. They were experimenting with how long one could breathe if one were to be buried prematurely. They were using a steel coffin for strength and it started to deform and leak soil before they even had half the expected weight on top. I know one has expired already but I would hope the coffin would at least stay intact?
I suppose this really begs the question on how much to spend on a coffin if it will decay this way.
Harrruuumph! Modern design, Wouldn't have happend in My Day.

I'd be tempted to place internal bracing structures in the coffin in that case.

The basic idea of burial is decay, after all. Ashes to ashes, dust to dust, that sort of thing. A coffin shouldn't be build to last. It's no more than a casket to bring the corpse to it's final resting place. It's the environmental idea behind the rules for coffins that they don't last.
If you want to last (or at least: what's left of you) think of mummification, piramids, sarcophagus. Or cryopreservation.
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« Reply #27 on: March 22, 2012, 12:22:33 am »

In the old days, you could get coffins with pulley systems for setting off a bell outside the coffin, for those worried about being buried alive. You can find diagrams for that in different places.
Ah, the 'Taberger Safety Coffin', Edgar Allan Poe wrote one of his stories about it - nothing like having the security of a bell to ring in case you were buried prematurely.

There were dozens and dozens of different designs and patents for this sort of thing. Crichton's The Great Train Robbery specifically mentions one by a different manufacturer.

As I understand it, it was the Victorians' morbid terror of being buried alive that lead to the development of modern embalming — its primary purpose was not to preserve the body, but to protect you from being buried alive by making sure you were dead.
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Angus A Fitziron
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« Reply #28 on: March 22, 2012, 12:27:23 am »

Even for burial at sea. It was the tradition in the Royal Navy, when sewing a corpse up in the canvas shroud to make the last stitch through the bridge of the nose to make sure they weren't just asleep or very drunk!
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SPBrewer
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« Reply #29 on: March 22, 2012, 02:55:41 am »

Quote
so the concept of building one's own final transport device, to our own design


If one were slim enough how about a Grandfather clock cabinet (with the pendulums removed) as a steampunk coffin?


Here is my favorite Clock Coffin!  Smiley
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SPBrewer
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« Reply #30 on: March 26, 2012, 10:19:48 am »

After more thought, I think I will leave a gold plated plaque, like those on the Pioneer ships,
with an added message "If found, please return to the planet Earth for proper burial".
That ought to keep them guessing.  Smiley
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Banfili
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« Reply #31 on: March 26, 2012, 01:24:42 pm »

Angus A Fitziron, I think the last stitch went through the cartilage below the nasal bone - that really hurts like "$^&*", & if you weren't dead or comatose, it would certainly wake you up!
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Lazaras
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« Reply #32 on: March 28, 2012, 05:09:53 pm »

In the old days, you could get coffins with pulley systems for setting off a bell outside the coffin, for those worried about being buried alive. You can find diagrams for that in different places.
Ah, the 'Taberger Safety Coffin', Edgar Allan Poe wrote one of his stories about it - nothing like having the security of a bell to ring in case you were buried prematurely.  Of course the downside was grave robbers then knew where the freshest diggings were, and doubly worse, the few folks using such devices were even bigger targets as they were more likely to be buried many personal possessions since they thought they might be making a return appearance to the living. markf
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I see the risk of graverobbers as a bonus actually. They'll be around at odd hours in case you wake up in the middle of the night and thus are unlikely to attract the attention of decent folk. Plus they have incentive to be quick about digging!

Losing a ring or pendant is a small price to pay for prompt retrieval!

In a more serious note my condolences for your loss.

Also. Has nobody brought up donating their remains to Science? Shame on the lot of you!

I kinda like the idea of having the mortal bits of me pressed into diamonds and put into commemorative jewelry but then again I doubt my body's all that fit for organ recycling.
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« Reply #33 on: March 28, 2012, 05:56:51 pm »

Quote
Has nobody brought up donating their remains to Science

I'm donating mine to Science fiction!
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« Reply #34 on: March 28, 2012, 10:24:03 pm »


Also. Has nobody brought up donating their remains to Science? Shame on the lot of you!

I kinda like the idea of having the mortal bits of me pressed into diamonds and put into commemorative jewelry but then again I doubt my body's all that fit for organ recycling.

With my genetic condition, I've been a science experiment most of my life.  In fact, at this very moment I am receiving monthly doses of a genetically engineered antibody reverse engineered from mouse DNA and copied over to human cells.  The treatment may be the first FDA approved treatment for the condition as a whole rather than just treating the symptoms individually.

So yeah, I've done my duty to science.  Diamonds all the way once I'm gone.
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Kryss LaBryn
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« Reply #35 on: March 28, 2012, 11:47:57 pm »

Seconding the getting-cremated-and-making-a-Steampunk-urn idea. Or, perhaps, going with a nice wooden base model, and making a Steampunk headstone? You'll have to check the local regulations, of course, because some cemetaries prefer that all the markers are set flush with the ground so as to make it easier to mow the lawn (which I heavily disagree with; I refuse to hide, completely invisible, under snow for 6-8 months months of the year just to make things easier for some kid on a ride'em), but not all do. I know a friend recently was buying an actual headstone for her husband, so they do still use them in some areas.

Might be a fascinating challenge: to, within the parameters of size and materials as dictated by the cemetary, build something Steamy that will last in the weather for generations.

Sorry for your loss!
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« Reply #36 on: March 29, 2012, 12:54:57 am »

The ones with the flat markers usually have a place for a vase for flowers.  Several years ago I made a custom piece that fit in were the vase would go.  It was a miniture mailbox so that people could leave letters or notes.  This was for a teenage boy that died of cancer and wanted friends and family to write him letters after he was gone.  I was honored to be able to create this memorial. 
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Kryss LaBryn
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« Reply #37 on: March 29, 2012, 05:35:42 am »

That is a really cool idea! Yes, that would be a very, well, cool thing to be able to do for him, and them.
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redcell7
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« Reply #38 on: March 30, 2012, 07:23:27 pm »

maybe one like this  lol   http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1260388834#!/photo.php?fbid=3554475061466&set=a.3554474621455.2162471.1260388834&type=1&theater
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SPBrewer
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« Reply #39 on: March 30, 2012, 07:49:26 pm »

maybe one like this  lol   http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1260388834#!/photo.php?fbid=3554475061466&set=a.3554474621455.2162471.1260388834&type=1&theater



A clockwork lid?  When does it open?  Smiley

Stan

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redcell7
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« Reply #40 on: March 30, 2012, 08:24:51 pm »

it is set more for estetics made out of leather brass and copper
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D.Oakes
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« Reply #41 on: March 31, 2012, 06:16:48 pm »

Quote
so the concept of building one's own final transport device, to our own design


If one were slim enough how about a Grandfather clock cabinet (with the pendulums removed) as a steampunk coffin?


Here is my favorite Clock Coffin!  Smiley



....I want it..... Grin

Gah, I wish my mom and I had had more time to plan these sorts of things out.  I was actually going to make her headstone (actually a "brick table" style burial as seen in some of the older graves of New Orleans) but we found that the cemetery has way too many rules governing what one is allowed to do.  I'm hoping to figure out some way to accessorize any basic monument the family or her friends from the EMS decide to use. 
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« Reply #42 on: June 05, 2016, 10:47:09 pm »

Recently in San Francisco, someone discovered a coffin under their house. It was a child's coffin, made of bronze and with inlaid glass windows, buried about 150 years ago.

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Little-girl-rose-still-in-hand-found-in-coffin-7943552.php
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« Reply #43 on: June 06, 2016, 12:14:44 am »

Anyone thought of a Pandorica?  The sides with clockwork timey wimey bits?

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creagmor
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« Reply #44 on: June 06, 2016, 12:52:55 am »

Back when I was still residing in the US, I worked for twenty years, as a groundskeeper in a Southern California cemetery. Regarding caskets, and cremation urns to be buried, there was no law requiring it, but virtually all cemeteries in that state stipulate that they be put into a cement burial container of some kind. In South Africa there is no such stipulation, so cemetery grounds have a washboard-like appearance.  

As for caskets there are those available which comply with Hebraic requirements, in that they contain no metal. Some of these resemble the stereotypical 19th century versions. I assume that one these could be purchased and then modified it to suit ones taste.

As to buying a casket/cremation urn, remember two things; virtually all us are going require one eventually, and undoubtedly the prices will continue to go up.  
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« Reply #45 on: June 12, 2016, 04:31:54 pm »

I want to be cremated and have my ashes put into the rubber vat at the Trojan Prophylactic company.
Then I'll be getting into, er IT, after I'm gone!  Smiley


How about the K-Y Jelly lubricant factory?
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« Reply #46 on: June 12, 2016, 07:17:10 pm »

I want to be cremated and have my ashes put into the rubber vat at the Trojan Prophylactic company.
Then I'll be getting into, er IT, after I'm gone!  Smiley


How about the K-Y Jelly lubricant factory?

Crunchy...  Shocked

HP
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