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Author Topic: Worth the effort?  (Read 2074 times)
king of diamonds
Gunner
**
New Zealand New Zealand


« on: March 08, 2012, 09:13:14 am »

I found this old watch at the local flea market for $20
From around 1950( I think) Jupiter Model A, size 12. Basically what the layman thinks when you say "pocket watch"

Has not had a good life: currently not working, missing a hand and (i think) a broken mainspring. All and all, poor condition.

I have never tried repairing watches before, reckon its worth trying to fix? If not I may just gut the thing and get out some gears =( though that would be an ignoble end for a watch...

If you don't think its likely I will be able to find a replacement would it be possible to put in a cheap Chinese movement? Also, regardless of what I am doing I will need to get it apart. Where could I find or, preferably, make  screwdrivers that small (I live in New Zealand so I am unlikely to find anything locally and buying from the US is akward at best) filing microdrivers?


Sorry about the lack of pics, my phone has just decided it hates my computor and won't connect. Shouldn't really be needed, standard swiss movement. Jeweled bearings etc. If you think there may be other things wrong tell me and I will list symptoms and detailed pics
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Abslomrob
Deck Hand
*
Canada Canada



WWW
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2012, 05:03:27 pm »

Repairing watches isn't necessarily hard, but its not something you can just "pick up" without putting in a fair amount of time, effort and money.  Things like hairsprings and pivots can be very delicate and easily broken, and getting replacment parts for the more obscure brands can be difficult.  It's a worthwhile hobby if you're care to invest in it though.

A 12 size watch would be equivalent to around 17''' (that's "ligne"); a size that isn't common these days.  The largest Chinese movement I have a listing for is 11.5''' (but I think you can find a Chinese equivalent to the 16.5''' ETA 6497/8).  Those won't fit directly, but you could probably bodge up a retaining ring.
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All my vintages are at http://www.abslomrob.com
king of diamonds
Gunner
**
New Zealand New Zealand


« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2012, 10:37:48 pm »

Figured as much. Clockmaking is something I hope to get into but I should probably focus on my studies.

Oh well, to the dissasembly table it goes...


Anyone know how to make watch screwdrivers? I have had no luck finding them on this half of the globe and I really would rather not mess around with American sites. I was thinking that grinding down a set of microdrivers might work but more advice required.

Thank you very much for your time good sir
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Abslomrob
Deck Hand
*
Canada Canada



WWW
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2012, 05:34:53 pm »

If you know how to shape the heads, you can get by with dollar-store stuff, but the quality of the steel is usually very low, which can lead to the heads warping very quickly.  So you end up touching up the heads frequently.  I've heard that the best screwdrivers can be made using old HSS drill bits.
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Mercury Wells
Rogue Ætherlord
*
I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2012, 03:57:42 am »

KoD...two options
1) I and no doubt others here might advise you dismantle the watch in an inclosed space something like a carboard box with a clear plastic face towards you and hand holes. Oh and the insides should be painted matt black to made the search for the pieces easier.
or
2) Show the watch to a couple of watch repairers or valuers, to see if it is worth repairing (some 1950 watches are worth keeping). If not, do option 1.  
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Oh...my old war wound? I got that at The Battle of Dorking. Very nasty affair that was, I can tell you.

The Ministry of Tea respectfully advises you to drink one cup of tea day...for that +5 Moral Fibre stat.
king of diamonds
Gunner
**
New Zealand New Zealand


« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2012, 08:43:54 am »

Checked it out online, mid - low range. not worth it
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frances
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2012, 11:05:47 pm »

I dismantle watches inside a large glass jar.  Then you can see what is going on all round.
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Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2012, 03:00:10 am »

Quote
I dismantle watches inside a large glass jar.

I didn't realize your avatar was lifesize! Roll Eyes
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Never ask 'Why?'
Always ask 'Why not!?'
Abslomrob
Deck Hand
*
Canada Canada



WWW
« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2012, 11:32:20 pm »

I dismantle watches on an old watchmakers bench I bought at auction.  Amongst other things, it has a little "shelf" with cloth on it below the bench that you pull out against your stomach as you're working  on the watch; this helps catch flying parts.  Normally, the only thing you have to worry about "flying" are the little springs (like shipper springs or the ones used for some calender works).  Having good tweezers (and keeping the points straight) helps immensely, as does using Rodico to secure the parts before attempting to remove them (Rodico is a special putty-like substance that is used to clean fingerprints off the movement).  It also helps to work on a linoleum floor; smooth enough to make finding parts easy, and spongy enough not to break pivots if you drop a wheel.
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Lady Chrystal
Master Tinkerer
***
Wales Wales


Lady Adventurer, Chronicler


« Reply #9 on: August 10, 2012, 11:45:26 pm »

This sort of kit would help a lot:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/20pcs-Deluxe-opener-repair-Remover/dp/B006CQT9QW/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1344638680&sr=8-2

Try "watchmakerss tools" or "watchmakers screwdrivers" as search terms.
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"The Chrystal? Ah, now - that would be telling."
.
Lady Chrystal
Master Tinkerer
***
Wales Wales


Lady Adventurer, Chronicler


« Reply #10 on: August 10, 2012, 11:50:19 pm »

Bit pricey,  but how about:

http://tradetools.co.nz/products/3652140

- in NZ.
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Abslomrob
Deck Hand
*
Canada Canada



WWW
« Reply #11 on: August 11, 2012, 03:58:15 am »

If you really want to learn what you're doing, the online "TimeZone Watch School", and its associated toolkits are an excellent start.  But they're a bit expensive.

http://www.timezonewatchschool.com/WatchSchool/
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