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Author Topic: OLD watch I know nothing about  (Read 2225 times)
Heather1988
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« on: December 18, 2011, 02:35:56 am »

I have this old watch that has a silver case that it slides into.It's made by Wesclox it has a emblem on it in the bottom right corner on the case it,winds-up,and seems to be old my step Father gave it to me before passing..I have done alot of researching and nothing any ideas?
 Huh
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Captain Lyerly
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At the helm of the Frumious Bandersnatch


« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2011, 04:56:08 am »

Wesclox made the Scotty; it was a pretty common pocket watch, and was available up into the 1970s, as I recall.



Some had black faces



Does yours look like either of these?


Cheers!

Chas.
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Captain Sir Charles A. Lyerly, O.B.T.
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SteamEngineer
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United States United States



« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2011, 04:57:57 am »

Does the watch slide out of the case and then tilt back at an angle, so that it stands upright and you can read the time?. I have had something like this, it was a small travel clock. It didn't have an alarm , but was just to tell time when on the road. I believe that it was made by Westclock .

Charles M aka Steam Engineer .
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von Corax
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Moderator
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Prof. Darwin Prætorius von Corax


« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2011, 08:19:07 am »

First, I've suggested to the moderators that this thread be moved to Chronautomata, which is where the horologists hang out.

Second, if you could post some clear photos it would be of great help in identifying your timepiece. The horologists will want photos of the works, especially of any markings on the backplate, but if you don't know how to open it just post the outside and someone will help you get it open.

By the way, welcome to Brass Goggles.

Kind regards,
Prof. Darwin Prætorius von Corax
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Heather1988
Deck Hand
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United States United States


« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2011, 10:14:18 pm »

this is it
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Major Willoughby Chase
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« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2011, 10:32:20 pm »

Heather, you need to use the full url of the image.

So that:
Code:
[img]http://img2.etsystatic.com/il_fullxfull.268070210.jpg[/img]
Becomes:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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HAC
Steam Theologian
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HAC_N800
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2011, 10:42:27 pm »

Westclox "Scotty" was a popular "dollar watch" -  a pocket watch or later, a wristwatch, that sold for about one dollar.

The sale of such watches began in 1892 by the watchmakers Ingersoll Watch Company, Waterbury Clock Company, and New Haven. Later, Western Clock (Westclox) in 1899 and the E. Ingraham Company also began manufacturing them. Dollar watches were practical, mass-produced timepieces intended to be as inexpensive as possible. Trademarks of dollar watches were their simple, pin pallet escapement movement, nickel or base metal cases, and riveted or fixed movement plates.. They tended to be pretty simple,and sturdy, if not stellar timekeepers.
 
They can be serviced, but its a right royal pain. You can't easily get the plates apart, and if you do without the factory jigs, you'll almost never get them back together.
One trick that can be used to get an old one running is to put a drop of lighter fluid on the balance pivots. Not really proper watchmaking technique, but these were always meant to be disposable watches. Another trick is to remove the movement from the case, take off the dial and hands, and within any further disassembly, and use Duo-Lube in jars 2 and 3 of the cleaning machine. You can also use Solo-Lube in the last jar instead of a rinse solution.. This usually does the trick..

Cheers
Harold
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Heather1988
Deck Hand
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United States United States


« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2011, 02:35:54 am »

http://thumbp9-bf1.thumb.mail.yahoo.com/tn?sid=2116814066&mid=AMTjimIAABZPTu5WrwNzy0LIYVY&midoffset=1_501387&partid=2&f=1258&fid=Inbox
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Heather1988
Deck Hand
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United States United States


« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2011, 02:40:28 am »

can you see it now? Huh
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Heather1988
Deck Hand
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United States United States


« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2011, 02:48:28 am »

http://thumbp9-bf1.thumb.mail.yahoo.com/tn?sid=2116814066&mid=AMLjimIAAXZITu6XUgcYYBDA%2Fys&midoffset=1_506680&partid=2&f=1258&fid=Inbox     this is it outside of the case
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Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
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United States United States


« Reply #10 on: December 23, 2011, 04:09:14 am »

eyecantcathing

I'm pretty sure you can try to add an image,then before you 'post' it-'preview' it to see if you've done it the correct way. That's what I've done in the past-I can never remember how to work these things Tongue.
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