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Author Topic: Are you sewing anything right now? Mk II  (Read 39946 times)
bicyclebuilder
Zeppelin Overlord
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Netherlands Netherlands


A.K.A. Scanner Camera Builder


« Reply #725 on: July 03, 2017, 06:57:18 am »

I tip my hat to all sewers here.
"are you sewing anything right now?", well with "you" being my wife, my mother and I, then yes.
For the upcoming Elfia fair in Arcen, the Netherlands, we are making three costumes.
My wife and daughter are going for a fairy dress, altering my wife's weddingdress and making a smaller, simpler version of that dress.
For me, I'm going to be a victorian/steampunk photographer. My attire is made from scratch, but with aid of a template kit.

Here is a picture of a couple of weeks ago.
We've had the guidelines of the template kit, but that doesn't mean we didn't have mistakes:
- adding lenght to the seams, while we shouldn't have;
- sewing the lining of the sleeves upside down;
- alterations due to the added length of the seams and my weird body;
- misinterpeting the template and having to alter again;
- and a few more mistakes I've failed to mention.

My wife and daugther's dresses are no picnick either. Relatively, the dresses went with less mistakes, but very time-consuming.
The bottom half of their dresses are going to look like pentals of a flower. Made from different colors organza.
I think we've made about 200 individual pentals, sewing them on a petticoat.

It really humbles me to see all of your dresses and suits made from scratch, carefully picking the fabric, designing from scratch and endless alterations and addings.
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The best way to learn is by personal experience.
Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #726 on: July 03, 2017, 06:43:19 pm »



I was wondering about reinforcing the edge with ribbon, but at 25 metres that's a lot of ribbon. So how is the fight going? One consolation, once it is done I'm sure it will look stunning.

Yours,
Miranda.

Actually I love the idea of the ribbon and may use it if I ever feel insane enough to try this pattern again as it would only be 12m or so just to do the bottom edge of the frills and I'd attach them slightly differently to the pattern instructions which would mean no raw edges showing (you live and learn - well you certainly do with simplicity pattern instructions). I believe I may be winning the fight with this one though and have only got to finish the waistband.  Hurrah!
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You have to tread a fine line between avant-garde surrealism and getting yourself sectioned...
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #727 on: July 04, 2017, 03:50:24 am »

I tip my hat to all sewers here.
"are you sewing anything right now?", well with "you" being my wife, my mother and I, then yes.
For the upcoming Elfia fair in Arcen, the Netherlands, we are making three costumes.
My wife and daughter are going for a fairy dress, altering my wife's weddingdress and making a smaller, simpler version of that dress.
For me, I'm going to be a victorian/steampunk photographer. My attire is made from scratch, but with aid of a template kit.

Here is a picture of a couple of weeks ago.
We've had the guidelines of the template kit, but that doesn't mean we didn't have mistakes:
- adding lenght to the seams, while we shouldn't have;
- sewing the lining of the sleeves upside down;
- alterations due to the added length of the seams and my weird body;
- misinterpeting the template and having to alter again;
- and a few more mistakes I've failed to mention.

My wife and daugther's dresses are no picnick either. Relatively, the dresses went with less mistakes, but very time-consuming.
The bottom half of their dresses are going to look like pentals of a flower. Made from different colors organza.
I think we've made about 200 individual pentals, sewing them on a petticoat.

It really humbles me to see all of your dresses and suits made from scratch, carefully picking the fabric, designing from scratch and endless alterations and addings.


All the more valid your effort which is rather epic, I must say. I feel like an absolute cheater, when I've mostly avoided sewing anything and just exercised my "purchasing google-fu" to find what I needed...

I did have to skip participation at a traditional cosplay event earlier this year (it was an invitation to Steampunks to participate at SXSW - we have been notably absemt in the last 3 years, I'd say), because I did not "make from scratch" a certain percentage of my outfit... I didn't realize that a rule in cosplay is that everything must be made from scratch  Undecided Kudos to you if you have oir are acquiring the skills to be able to do that.
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Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #728 on: July 05, 2017, 06:02:21 pm »

I tip my hat to all sewers here.
"are you sewing anything right now?", well with "you" being my wife, my mother and I, then yes.
For the upcoming Elfia fair in Arcen, the Netherlands, we are making three costumes.
My wife and daughter are going for a fairy dress, altering my wife's weddingdress and making a smaller, simpler version of that dress.
For me, I'm going to be a victorian/steampunk photographer. My attire is made from scratch, but with aid of a template kit.

Here is a picture of a couple of weeks ago.
We've had the guidelines of the template kit, but that doesn't mean we didn't have mistakes:
- adding lenght to the seams, while we shouldn't have;
- sewing the lining of the sleeves upside down;
- alterations due to the added length of the seams and my weird body;
- misinterpeting the template and having to alter again;
- and a few more mistakes I've failed to mention.

My wife and daugther's dresses are no picnick either. Relatively, the dresses went with less mistakes, but very time-consuming.
The bottom half of their dresses are going to look like pentals of a flower. Made from different colors organza.
I think we've made about 200 individual pentals, sewing them on a petticoat.

It really humbles me to see all of your dresses and suits made from scratch, carefully picking the fabric, designing from scratch and endless alterations and addings.


Piccys! Piccys! Piccys! Pretty please?

Yours,
Miranda.
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bicyclebuilder
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Netherlands Netherlands


A.K.A. Scanner Camera Builder


« Reply #729 on: July 05, 2017, 07:05:01 pm »

@Miranda.T
There are some more pictures here: http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,48512.msg983795.html#msg983795
I have to add a few details to the attire and camera. After that, I'm going to do a photo-shoot.

@J. Wilhelm
I can imagine one can be frustrated after seeing an "off the shelf" attire, when one has spent hundreds of hours making clothes from scratch.
But to exclude less crafty (or maybe smarter  Wink) people goes against the whole Steampunk philosophy.
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J. Wilhelm
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Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


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« Reply #730 on: July 06, 2017, 02:37:03 am »

@Miranda.T
There are some more pictures here: http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,48512.msg983795.html#msg983795
I have to add a few details to the attire and camera. After that, I'm going to do a photo-shoot.

@J. Wilhelm
I can imagine one can be frustrated after seeing an "off the shelf" attire, when one has spent hundreds of hours making clothes from scratch.
But to exclude less crafty (or maybe smarter  Wink) people goes against the whole Steampunk philosophy.


Well, I have thought that part of the problem is that non-Steampunks, such as cosplayers, see the attire as a "costume," whereas we Steampunks do not.

I have been complimented by non Steampunks at SXSW this year and Halloween last year on the quality of my "costume." They marvel at the thickness, sturdyness, brightness and overall amount of detail I wear.  I keep telling them it's not a costume. It's real clothing you could wear every day if you wanted to. Some people are taken aback. They don't expect that response.
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Synistor 303
Gunner
**
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #731 on: July 08, 2017, 03:09:48 am »

I tip my hat to all sewers here.
"are you sewing anything right now?", well with "you" being my wife, my mother and I, then yes.
For the upcoming Elfia fair in Arcen, the Netherlands, we are making three costumes.
My wife and daughter are going for a fairy dress, altering my wife's weddingdress and making a smaller, simpler version of that dress.
For me, I'm going to be a victorian/steampunk photographer. My attire is made from scratch, but with aid of a template kit.

Here is a picture of a couple of weeks ago.
We've had the guidelines of the template kit, but that doesn't mean we didn't have mistakes:
- adding lenght to the seams, while we shouldn't have;
- sewing the lining of the sleeves upside down;
- alterations due to the added length of the seams and my weird body;
- misinterpeting the template and having to alter again;
- and a few more mistakes I've failed to mention.

My wife and daugther's dresses are no picnick either. Relatively, the dresses went with less mistakes, but very time-consuming.
The bottom half of their dresses are going to look like pentals of a flower. Made from different colors organza.
I think we've made about 200 individual pentals, sewing them on a petticoat.

It really humbles me to see all of your dresses and suits made from scratch, carefully picking the fabric, designing from scratch and endless alterations and addings.


Is it just me, or is that dog rolling its' eyes?  Cheesy
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J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #732 on: July 08, 2017, 08:39:52 am »

I tip my hat to all sewers here.
"are you sewing anything right now?", well with "you" being my wife, my mother and I, then yes.
For the upcoming Elfia fair in Arcen, the Netherlands, we are making three costumes.
My wife and daughter are going for a fairy dress, altering my wife's weddingdress and making a smaller, simpler version of that dress.
For me, I'm going to be a victorian/steampunk photographer. My attire is made from scratch, but with aid of a template kit.

Here is a picture of a couple of weeks ago.
We've had the guidelines of the template kit, but that doesn't mean we didn't have mistakes:
- adding lenght to the seams, while we shouldn't have;
- sewing the lining of the sleeves upside down;
- alterations due to the added length of the seams and my weird body;
- misinterpeting the template and having to alter again;
- and a few more mistakes I've failed to mention.

My wife and daugther's dresses are no picnick either. Relatively, the dresses went with less mistakes, but very time-consuming.
The bottom half of their dresses are going to look like pentals of a flower. Made from different colors organza.
I think we've made about 200 individual pentals, sewing them on a petticoat.

It really humbles me to see all of your dresses and suits made from scratch, carefully picking the fabric, designing from scratch and endless alterations and addings.


Is it just me, or is that dog rolling its' eyes?  Cheesy


No, the dog looks more worried to me.  Grin
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J. Wilhelm
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Board Moderator
Immortal
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United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #733 on: July 12, 2017, 11:08:14 am »

Aaaargh!  Direct embroidery of stars on shoulder boards was A TOTAL FAILURE! It seems so easy at first but it's very difficult. I'll have to figure out a different way of adding the stars! It ruined one of the shoulder boards. Thankfully I has a third one that is passable though it has a minor defect

The shoulder boards I made from neoprene sheet, nylon strap and polyester curtain rope.
Photo from from the Jacket modification thread:
http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,49038.msg984342.html#msg984342


Seems easy, buy this is actually hard to do:



Back to the drawing board...

~ ~ ~

EDIT: Using the ruined board I'm trying a new "radial" technique. Instead of embroidering parallel lines to make each leg of a star as us usually done, I'm passing all the thread as close as possible to the centre of the star and then the needle goes radially to all the perimeter of the star.


This technique which I came up with due to total inexperience, actually is  providing a very sharp outline of the stars, but it uses a ridiculously large amount of thread. The thread will not look as neat as in the professional samples, but it has one silver lining: its producing a very 3-Dimensional star. Since all the thread passes through the centre, it's raising the centre of the star quite a bit. It kind of looks like a Starfish

Right click to zoom

~ ~ ~


JW
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #734 on: July 13, 2017, 11:30:08 am »

OK. It looks like I have some results. I ploughed through and managed to embroider the stars. So this is the final result (see picture)... It took quite a bit of time, and sewing the large star was very difficult, on account that the string density at the heart of the star is very high, and it becomes really hard to push the needle. The nice effect of that is that the stars are very raised, It seems to me that the "radial method" works best for small stars, a little increase in the size of the star and you'll find yourself using a lot more string.

So now the question is, is this good enough? Given my lack of experience in the sartorial arts, I think this is as good as I can do for the moment. The texture is somewhat haphazard (see picture) as you have to guess where to thread the needle next so that the strings are more or less distributed evenly. There is no confusing this for a machine made embroidery.

My version of the US Army Lt. Gen. insignia, using curtain rope, nylon strap, neoprene sheet and embroidery with crafts-grade white thread.
Right click to zoom


I will now continue my posts in the thread dedicated to jacket modifications

http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,49038.msg984342.html#msg984342

Keep calm and carry on  Grin
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Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #735 on: July 13, 2017, 05:50:44 pm »

OK. It looks like I have some results. I ploughed through and managed to embroider the stars. So this is the final result (see picture)... It took quite a bit of time, and sewing the large star was very difficult, on account that the string density at the heart of the star is very high, and it becomes really hard to push the needle. The nice effect of that is that the stars are very raised, It seems to me that the "radial method" works best for small stars, a little increase in the size of the star and you'll find yourself using a lot more string.

So now the question is, is this good enough? Given my lack of experience in the sartorial arts, I think this is as good as I can do for the moment. The texture is somewhat haphazard (see picture) as you have to guess where to thread the needle next so that the strings are more or less distributed evenly. There is no confusing this for a machine made embroidery.

My version of the US Army Lt. Gen. insignia, using curtain rope, nylon strap, neoprene sheet and embroidery with crafts-grade white thread.
Right click to zoom


I will now continue my posts in the thread dedicated to jacket modifications

http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,49038.msg984342.html#msg984342

Keep calm and carry on  Grin


It looks to have worked out very well to me; I think your perseverance has paid off nicely.

Yours,
Miranda.
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bicyclebuilder
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Netherlands Netherlands


A.K.A. Scanner Camera Builder


« Reply #736 on: July 13, 2017, 06:24:11 pm »

...SNIP...

Is it just me, or is that dog rolling its' eyes?  Cheesy


No, the dog looks more worried to me.  Grin

Olivia does look a bit worried.
Actually, she saw me putting on a coat, that's her cue to go for a doggy walk.
She's patiently waiting and questioning if we are going outside.

...or she's just rolling her eyes.  Roll Eyes
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J. Wilhelm
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Board Moderator
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Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


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« Reply #737 on: July 19, 2017, 10:58:48 am »

OK. It looks like I have some results. I ploughed through and managed to embroider the stars. So this is the final result (see picture)... It took quite a bit of time, and sewing the large star was very difficult, on account that the string density at the heart of the star is very high, and it becomes really hard to push the needle. The nice effect of that is that the stars are very raised, It seems to me that the "radial method" works best for small stars, a little increase in the size of the star and you'll find yourself using a lot more string.

So now the question is, is this good enough? Given my lack of experience in the sartorial arts, I think this is as good as I can do for the moment. The texture is somewhat haphazard (see picture) as you have to guess where to thread the needle next so that the strings are more or less distributed evenly. There is no confusing this for a machine made embroidery.

My version of the US Army Lt. Gen. insignia, using curtain rope, nylon strap, neoprene sheet and embroidery with crafts-grade white thread.
Right click to zoom


I will now continue my posts in the thread dedicated to jacket modifications

http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,49038.msg984342.html#msg984342

Keep calm and carry on  Grin


It looks to have worked out very well to me; I think your perseverance has paid off nicely.

Yours,
Miranda.


Wait for the collar. I'm going to do something similar to that (without the embroidery *shudders* )
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