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Author Topic: James' non-SP model building thread  (Read 106821 times)
James Harrison
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« Reply #25 on: December 23, 2011, 08:02:00 pm »

Right.  I'm now on Christmas holidays so tomorrow I'm going to finish Prinz Eugen (work which entails a final coat of paint where the parts have been cut away from sprues). 

Boxing Day, HMS Barham shall be started. 

The N5, it would appear, may or may not go ahead- the chassis was delivered to the wrong address and I'm having the devil's own job getting hold of it  Angry At least I have the parts I accrued last year, so I can attempt to motorise a Hornby Dean Goods chassis and build on top of that.  If this new chassis does arrive.... there may be another project to consider, if the wheels/ wheel spacings suit. 

Speaking of other projects, a chance discovery that the leading coupled axles of an LNER B17 exactly match the coupled axles of a C4 means cogs are aturnin'... it may or may not be coincidence that today I recieved a back issue of Railway Modeller with drawings of a GCR/LNER 'Jersey Lily' in it....
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James Harrison
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« Reply #26 on: December 24, 2011, 05:07:15 pm »

Photos (about time I guess- I'm not all talk and no work)...

Prinz Eugen:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Built straight out of the box, no super-detailing, no replacement of parts, no photo-etch or anything like that.  The kit represents Prinz Eugen after her 1942 refit- after the loss of Bismarck the Kreigsmarine became a little paranoid about air attack.  Or so it would seem, considering this one has guns on top of guns (look closely at 'Bruno' and 'Caesar' turrets).  Not that it helped Prinz in the end- no amount of AA armament can withstand the brute force of an atom bomb....

LNER N5:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

This model I started last year- the thread can be found here.  After the new chassis went on an odyssey courtesy of an ebay vendor failing to pay attention to the postal address, I decided to make-do with what I already had.  So.  The rear upper part of the chassis block (it comes as two pieces of plastic held together by tension) had to be cut away to allow the motor mount (from an old Hornby 'Smokey Joe') to fit.  But then that makes the bottom of the chassis fall out...

This being (originally) a tender locomotive, there is a screw-hole for a coupling twixt engine and tender.  The loco I'm modelling doesn't have a tender- this hole being useless... long story short, the mount fits over the hole, then a screw goes through.  The mount overlaps the top part of the chassis so the two parts are now held together by tension at one end and by a srcew and big bit of metal at the other!  It works though.  The motor then is held in place by two-part epoxy resin.  It's still setting at the moment-shall have to see how that goes. 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #27 on: December 26, 2011, 01:03:13 pm »

Despite my best efforts, I gave in last night and did some modelling work on Christmas Day  Roll Eyes

Reset the motor and its mount so the worm drive now permanently engages with the gear wheel on the central axle.  Cut out my footplate from 1mm plastic, set it on the 0-6-0 chassis and then built the frame extensions onto that.  Now it has two seperate chassis (surely not a good idea?).  Added the radial axle, turning it in to an 0-6-2. 

This morning; ordered a pair of phospher bronze pick-ups off of ebay (postage costs more than the parts- why?), and material for the boiler (19mm brass tube from Eileen's Emporium- enough to build this, the D10, the C4 and the J11...).  I've also been looking at detailing parts- chimney, dome and backhead details from 247 Developments- unfortunately there are no photos of what you actually get on their website... I'm loath to spend money on something that may not be right.  Specifically for this one I'm looking for an LNER 'flowerpot' chimney, Parker/Pollitt dome and Robinson safety valve cover (these engines being built in the 1890s and running into the 1950s they become amalgams of parts of all ages- not helped by my chosen period of the early 1930s....)

To top it all off, last night I lay in bed after an hours' worth of botched modelling, thinking 'why didn't I just keep the wheels and put them in an entirely new chassis?'...
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Arkwright
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« Reply #28 on: December 27, 2011, 10:14:55 pm »

Sounds like good progress!

Flora bought me a Mk1 Male for Christmass - so that will be my next kit project. I will probable keep the steering wheels as per the kit, but redetail the exhaust and hatches. The paint scheme will be the Somme era forest pattern.

Other modelling news. I'm rebooting my Gn15 railway projects. Not much progress as yet, but I have some theme park ideas I want to pursue.

TTFN

Arkwright
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« Reply #29 on: December 28, 2011, 10:52:30 am »

Picked up Roden's
"WWII British Armoured Car"
, ie their Vickers / Rolls Royce Mk.I armoured car in the sales. Now, mainly due to this thread, I don't know what to do with it! I bought it with a view to kit bashing it for my steampunk themed 1/35 scale model railway as an imaginary long distance rally car in the same vein as the 1907 Peking to Paris race. (The railway is a mythical rural French setting, somewhere in the NE corner of that country and uses On3 track to represent early French 60cms track). But now, with all this excellent modelling and having actually looked at the kit I may just build it as is.

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« Reply #30 on: December 28, 2011, 11:28:32 am »


If that weren't period appropriate I just yesterday received drawings for a Great Central Railway 'Director' class loco- all I need now is the Hornby D49 or Schools or even an old Triang L1 chassis to be able to start on it.  My layout is going to be set in the 1930s- but at that time many Edwardian and even Victorian locomotives were still on top-link duties (look at how the typical British freight locomotive from the 1850s through to the 1940s was an 0-6-0 tender engine, for example).     


Lovely work on the Leipzig there James, very nice indeed!

I might still have a Triang L1 chassis sculling about one of my junk boxes, will attempt to find it later this evening and let you know.

Jaycraft did a resin Director body (to fit the L1 chassis) back in the 80s (I had their GER J19) and it was a decent enough casting. There were drawings of the Director class in Railway Modeller Feb 1991 while Pom-Pom J11 drawings appeared in the Aug 1998 RM.

I also recall an article (possibly Scale Model Trains or Model Trains) from the 80s where someone modified an Airfix Fowler 4F 0-6-0 into a very passable J11/3 (the higher boilered version) but the Airfix 4F chassis might be a suitable starting point for any J11 variant in terms of wheelbase and wheel diameter??
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James Harrison
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« Reply #31 on: December 28, 2011, 04:29:21 pm »

The 4F chassis is indeed a good candidate for a J11, and would be my own preferred start point (or maybe the upcoming Bachmann 3F?).  Somewhere in the loft I have drawings for both the J11 and the C13/C14 4-4-2 tanks (in the Railway Modellers of the late 1990s).  Just recently I went out and tracked down back issues of the same magazine for June 1989 (GCR 'Jersey Lily' atlantic) and July (?) 1991 ('Director' class). 

So my complete list of GCR drawings now runs thus:

-LNER N5 0-6-2 (model started)
-LNER J11 0-6-0 (drawings somewhere in the loft)
-LNER C13 4-4-2 (ditto ditto)
-LNER C4 4-4-2 (in consideration dependant upon availability of B17 chassis and B12 front bogie)
-LNER D10 4-4-0 (pending chassis L1 or D49)

I'm also considering a GCR/LNER L1 (later L3) 2-6-4 goods engine- dependant upon the intended chassis for the N5 actually turning up (it got, somehow, sent to Oxford...)

I recently bid on a resin kit of the D10- it ultimately sold for ~£60.  Silly money really, but if that's what people are prepared to pay.... personally I prefer spending the few pounds on the magazine and some brass tube/ plastic sheet (I learn more about loco building that way). 


Lovely work on the Leipzig there James, very nice indeed!


Thank you!  A first attempt at anything like a scratchbuild, and although a little ropey in places it's got that unique feel about it- German light crusiers are not often modelled (if one excepts the Revell WWI Emden and Dresden). 

Quote
I might still have a Triang L1 chassis sculling about one of my junk boxes, will attempt to find it later this evening and let you know.



That would be really helpful- if you can find it please do name your price!  (I'm looking at buying an entire Hornby D49 but not entirely sure the chassis alone justifies the outlay).

And, of course, still got Barham and Temeraire to start as well. 



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James Harrison
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« Reply #32 on: January 02, 2012, 12:28:44 pm »

I'm now up a creek without a paddle.  Finished the chassis, applied power- it didn't work.  Got down another loco- still no response.  Trying a third engine and I decided the controller was at fault.  So I wired up another controller and tried again.  Still no luck.  I tried meddling with the pick-ups.... big mistake.  Needless to say I now have a broken chassis, and have had to resort to buying an entire engine to cannibalise for parts.  We're now up to... four chassis for one loco. 

First chassis- the one I've recently been working on- doesn't work, unbalanced, broken. 
Second chassis- bought off of ebay, vendor mailed it to wrong address.  Considered irretrievably lost until otherwise. 
Third chassis- best not spoken of. 
Fourth chassis- currently attached to a Mainline Collett goods loco yet to be mailed. 

What can we learn from this?

1.  Chassis building is not my strong point. 
2.  I really should not meddle with chassis at all
3.  Building chassis from an assortment of Hornby spare parts can be done- but probably best not. 

On the plus side- the brass pipe has arrived for the boiler.  So, the body at least can carry on- but probably won't until the new chassis has arrived. 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #33 on: January 07, 2012, 07:03:16 pm »

After a few days to rest, have a re-think and wait for new materials, I have a little progress to report. 

I went down into Birmingham today and managed to procure a few supplies:

-2 bottles of paint thinners (one for cleaning brushes, one for thinning paints);
-3 pots of paint (hull brown, mid-grey and mid-ochre) for HMS Barham;
-4 new brushes
-1 tube of glue
-3 sheets of 0.5mm plastic. 

The new chassis for the N5 arrived a few days ago... placed against a scale drawing and I find something amiss... the top of the motor being about 2.5mm above where the top of the firebox should be  Undecided  Three options to remedy this:

1. Re-motor the chassis.
2. File down the top of the chassis casting the motor is set inside. 
3. Take the hit and pitch the boiler to suit the chassis. 

A quick read of the last few posts here will show that... chassis are not my strongpoint.  I've decided to take the hit and pitch the boiler 3mm higher than scale.  A sketch over the scale drawing last night showed that solely pitching the boiler higher makes the rest of the model look wrong... so the cab sidesheets, bunker and tank sides are going to be stretched by 3mm at the bottom too. 

That problem sorted to my satisfaction I've begun to build the body, starting with the footplate (this is about as far as I got last time before all went awry).  Luckily the footplate I'd cut a few weeks ago fits over this new chassis, after one or two tweaks and cuts here and there.  Problem is, at the front it rides 16mm above the rails, at the back more like 19.  Cue the building of a bolster fitting over the front of the chassis to bring the footplate level.  Now, onto the body proper!
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Arkwright
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« Reply #34 on: January 07, 2012, 11:54:49 pm »

Ah - the joys of loco building. I sometimes think that chassis are built with unequal ends to stop people building their own.

Progress on the tanks. I now have a Mk I/II female.

The sides of the Male are now done and looking quite nautical when laid down flat. Cut down the back hatch. I just need to fill the hole and add the correct MkI hatch and the bracing. I currently debating what to do about lost rivets. Its either PVA glue or ignore them. Oh. I have fixed the guns, better for my purposes.

TTFN

Arkwright
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« Reply #35 on: January 08, 2012, 12:35:05 am »

I'm now up a creek without a paddle.  Finished the chassis, applied power- it didn't work.  Got down another loco- still no response.  Trying a third engine and I decided the controller was at fault.  So I wired up another controller and tried again.  Still no luck.  I tried meddling with the pick-ups.... big mistake. 

Pick-ups I find fairly easy to do... copperclad strip and some phosphor-bronze strip or wire. Solder wire to copperclad (along with a feed wire), bend PB to bear on the wheel rims, glue in place to underside of chassis and attach wire to motor.

Quote
3.  Building chassis from an assortment of Hornby spare parts can be done- but probably best not. 

Luckily, Hornby used a fairly standardised set of parts, so swapping bits from various chassis is doable.

Any chance of a pic of the 4 chassis in question please, James?? I might be able to offer some advice.


The new chassis for the N5 arrived a few days ago... placed against a scale drawing and I find something amiss... the top of the motor being about 2.5mm above where the top of the firebox should be  Undecided  Three options to remedy this:

1. Re-motor the chassis.
2. File down the top of the chassis casting the motor is set inside. 
3. Take the hit and pitch the boiler to suit the chassis. 


Is the motor angled? A shorter/slimmer motor might do the trick. Filing down the motor mount is possible, but must be done using the worm/gear mesh point as your pivot, otherwise you'll have problems. Again, a pic would be useful.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #36 on: January 08, 2012, 12:16:19 pm »

My problem is that I just can't solder well.  The joints always break distressingly soon after I make them, or the solder decides it likes the iron more than the brass/bronze/tin I'm trying to coerce it to adhere to.  Either a) I need a better flux or b) I should clean the metal more rigourously beforehand.  Plus I have an irrational fear of burning my hands.  I have, on occasion, even managed to pick up a hot iron at the wrong end... 

Photos of the chassis in question are forthcoming- the batteries in my camera died as soon as I turned it on....
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Angus A Fitziron
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« Reply #37 on: January 08, 2012, 12:54:39 pm »

James, what size (wattage) iron are you using? Also what kind of soldering tip? As someone has said on here before - the trick of soldering is to heat the metal parts being soldered, to get them up to temperature so the solder flows - do not heat the solder directly. You may see people doing that (heating the solder) but that is only to improve the conductivity between the iron tip and parts being soldered, it is not to stick the pieces together! Have you tried practising on non critical parts? Are the chassis parts brass? Is there an opportunity to 'tin' the brass parts first before bringing them together?

Thankfully, soldering is one of the 'dark arts' so practice and experience will bring results!

Good luck.

ffitz
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« Reply #38 on: January 08, 2012, 01:37:24 pm »

My problem is that I just can't solder well.  The joints always break distressingly soon after I make them, or the solder decides it likes the iron more than the brass/bronze/tin I'm trying to coerce it to adhere to.  Either a) I need a better flux or b) I should clean the metal more rigourously beforehand.  Plus I have an irrational fear of burning my hands.  I have, on occasion, even managed to pick up a hot iron at the wrong end... 

Photos of the chassis in question are forthcoming- the batteries in my camera died as soon as I turned it on....


2 things essential for good soldering - cleanliness and heat.

Make sure the pieces at the join are clean - glass-fibre brush, emery paper, etc and then don't touch the joining surfaces after you've cleaned them. Also make sure the tip of the iron is tinned properly - it's that tinning (a thin film of solder) which will transfer the heat effectively. Wipe the tip regularly on a piece of damp sponge before and after each join. Many soldering iron stands come with a sponge. Re-tin regularly. You can get a pot of 'tinning and cleaning' stuff which is solder in flux. Dip the iron into that, then wipe on the damp sponge Also make sure your solder is clean - just wipe the end you'll be using on a piece of wet & dry or similar.

If possible, support the work-pieces - small wood blocks, clips, etc. Apply flux along the join, then apply heat and bring the solder to the work. Alternately, cut small pieces of solder and place them in the flux along the join, then apply heat. When the solder runs freely, remove heat and allow to cool. If the solder hardens and is shiny, it's a good join. If it's dull, it's a 'dry' joint - applying more flux and heating again usually does the trick.

I use an Antex 25w iron and medium bit for most jobs (it even copes well with 7mm brass wagon kits). You need an iron of high enough wattage to keep supplying heat even on a large surface (the work acts as a heat sink, drawing heat away from the iron and join). For flux, I usually use either 12% phosphoric acid or a old, old tub of 'Fluxite' paste. Solder is 224deg, 188deg or 145deg, all lead/tin based. I tried the newer lead-free stuff and it's nowhere near as good.

It's easier to demonstrate in person rather than in writing, but there are a few good guides available online:

http://www.finescale.org.uk/images/stories/pdfs/ds002.pdf
http://youtu.be/xrVCkEoY_8M
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James Harrison
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« Reply #39 on: January 08, 2012, 02:55:41 pm »

Cheers!  I must practice my soldering more often, I really should.  Incidentally, I checked my iron and it's a 25 watt example.  I've no idea about the solder I use- it's just a length of the stuff my Grandfather gave me with the iron itself, but appears to be one of those types with the flux running down the centre of the wire. 

Photos I promised:

The first chassis I attempted: 

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
 

The weight of the motor and motor mount pulls the front axle off of the rails- the original intention was to remedy this by the addition of lead shot over the front axle.  This is after my attempts at attahing the pickups- hence the lumps of solder on the motor....

The current chassis:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)


Basically this came complete from a Replica Railways 'Collett Goods'.  It's a split chassis (I believe this model has since had a chassis re-design) and the weight completely fills the original body shell.  What the photo shows however is the running plate I fabricated from 1mm plastic sheet, and the frame extensions attached for the radial pony truck.  These frame extensions are not fixed to the chassis itself, but rather to the running plate. 

Detail:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

To attach the running plate to the chassis was a bit of a job.  In the previous photo a white plastic bolster can be seen in front of the first axle- to get the running plate up to the correct height.  At the rear I had the opposite problem- the running plate was too low.  I had to fabricate a second bolster to get it to the correct height, then add a bridge piece between the running plate and the top of the chassis. 

Starting the rest of the model:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

The running plate was bowing a little and I was concerned about how this would look on the finished model.  However, the addition of the valences has served to straighten up the whole construction fairly well. 

So right now the model looks like this: 

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

The next stage is to cut out the tank, bunker and cab sides- all one piece- and add those.  I am thinking of adding the bunker, tanks and cab to the chassis and finding a way of making the boiler removeable so as to be able to access the motor.  Usually it is the case that the whole body shell comes away from the chassis; my ad-hoc method of construction thus far has made that solution impossible.  Still, it all adds to the learning curve I guess. 

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« Reply #40 on: January 08, 2012, 04:26:14 pm »

Cheers!  I must practice my soldering more often, I really should.  Incidentally, I checked my iron and it's a 25 watt example.  I've no idea about the solder I use- it's just a length of the stuff my Grandfather gave me with the iron itself, but appears to be one of those types with the flux running down the centre of the wire. 

Definitely use some separate flux - even for electrical soldering and with resin-cored solder.

When joining wire (either to other wire or say, a motor) I first strip approx 1/2" of insulation, twist the exposed strands together and then dip in flux, then apply heat and solder. This tins the wire end ready for use. If possible, make a mechanical joint (loop the tinned wire around the other wire or clip), apply a little more flux, then heat and solder.

Quote
Photos I promised:


The current chassis:

Basically this came complete from a Replica Railways 'Collett Goods'.  It's a split chassis (I believe this model has since had a chassis re-design) and the weight completely fills the original body shell.  What the photo shows however is the running plate I fabricated from 1mm plastic sheet, and the frame extensions attached for the radial pony truck.  These frame extensions are not fixed to the chassis itself, but rather to the running plate. 

Ah yes... the old Mainline/Replica split chassis. Very difficult to remotor I'm afraid  Sad And being a tank loco, you don't have the option to cut away the motor block completely and use a tender drive. You could file down the motor block a bit, certainly round off the upper edges but that's best done with it stripped right down otherwise the filings will gum up the motor and gears. Been there, done that  Embarrassed

Quote

The next stage is to cut out the tank, bunker and cab sides- all one piece- and add those.  I am thinking of adding the bunker, tanks and cab to the chassis and finding a way of making the boiler removeable so as to be able to access the motor.  Usually it is the case that the whole body shell comes away from the chassis; my ad-hoc method of construction thus far has made that solution impossible.  Still, it all adds to the learning curve I guess. 


I've done locos with a removable boiler/firebox - leave the firebox slightly long at the cab end so it plugs into a suitable opening on the cab front. I had the smokebox wrapper extend down to the footplate around a plasticard cradle as one piece. Alternately, build up the cradle on the footplate with the tube resting on it, though it's more difficult to disguise the join that way. You'll need to cut away a lot of the tube to sit down over the chassis and I fear you may also have to make the cab front and roof removable with the boiler, as the motor block (which drives the rear coupled axle IIRC) will extend back into the cab.

I'd suggest building the tanks/bunker and lower cabsides as an 'inner core' from thickish plasticard (60 thou) for strength with a thinner (10 or 20 thou) full-length overlays to get the thinness required for the upper cabsides where the cutout is.


It is possible to build an entire chassis from plasticard, using brass bearings for the axles and a separate motor/gearbox - I did one some years ago for a Andrew Barclay Class 06 0-4-0 diesel mechanical shunter in O gauge. Side frames and spacers were all from 80 thou plasticard, but you could get away with 40 thou in 4mm:ft. The gearbox sorts the drive and gear meshing problems and I found that I could snuggle the motor down almost between the frames. It's still going strong.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #41 on: January 08, 2012, 04:54:24 pm »

I've done locos with a removable boiler/firebox - leave the firebox slightly long at the cab end so it plugs into a suitable opening on the cab front. I had the smokebox wrapper extend down to the footplate around a plasticard cradle as one piece. Alternately, build up the cradle on the footplate with the tube resting on it, though it's more difficult to disguise the join that way. You'll need to cut away a lot of the tube to sit down over the chassis and I fear you may also have to make the cab front and roof removable with the boiler, as the motor block (which drives the rear coupled axle IIRC) will extend back into the cab.



Slightly extending the firebox does sound like a good idea.  As it is one I hadn't thought of I guess it's a good idea that I've called a halt for the day before I went any further- as the next step, had I carried on, would have been the fabrication of the front spectacle plate...

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
 

Firstly I cut, from 0.5mm plastic, rough cuts of the bunker, cab and tank sides.  These were then glued onto the running plate. 

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

More accurate tracings of the same components were then made onto good quality paper.  These were then cut out and affixed to the plastic roughs, which themselves were then tidied up to conform to the tracings. 

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Hence the model now looks like this.  The next step is going to be the fronts and tops to the tanks, the bunker coal plate and the rear spectacle plate for the cab.  This will give the body already built a lot more in the way of rigidity. 

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Angus A Fitziron
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« Reply #42 on: January 08, 2012, 05:26:28 pm »

Cheers!  I must practice my soldering more often, I really should.  Incidentally, I checked my iron and it's a 25 watt example.  I've no idea about the solder I use- it's just a length of the stuff my Grandfather gave me with the iron itself, but appears to be one of those types with the flux running down the centre of the wire. 


The resin cored solder is OK for attaching small wires but not for tin work. It sounds like it could be rather old as well, which if it has been loose in the bottom of a tool box somewhere it will have oxidised thus making it even more difficult to get a result. I would buy a new roll of lead / tin solder produced especially for tin work. I agree with Mécanicien de Vapeur that the new plumber's lead free solder is not suitable for model making (unless you are going to suck it!)

Coming on well. You are providing provocation encouragement for me to stop writing and get on with my scratch built Decauville 0-4-0...

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James Harrison
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« Reply #43 on: January 08, 2012, 05:33:07 pm »

Coming on well. You are providing provocation encouragement for me to stop writing and get on with my scratch built Decauville 0-4-0...

Just another free service I provide  Wink  Is that the eccentric camelback-style design with three axles and only four wheels?
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Angus A Fitziron
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« Reply #44 on: January 08, 2012, 05:58:35 pm »

Coming on well. You are providing provocation encouragement for me to stop writing and get on with my scratch built Decauville 0-4-0...

Just another free service I provide  Wink  Is that the eccentric camelback-style design with three axles and only four wheels?

I can't recall a camelback (or is that a wind up??) The prototype will be a Progrès 5 Tonne on 60cms gauge. This is one I photographed at Chemin de Fer Touristique du Tarn a couple of years ago in Saint-Lieux-Lès-Lavaur. The railway is 50cms so the engines have been re-gauged as necessary. It is one of the few places that I have seen steam trains running actually on the highway as if it were a tramway (which I suppose it is....  )



This is another 5T on a short piece of road between the station and the railway yard (where all the lines are coming from to the right). Over my left shoulder, the road bears off and the railway continues as a rail only permanent way. The railway preservation team got away with it by having the piece of road (~200m?) designated as a level crossing (note the french roadsign) but one where the cars and trains travel in the same direction!

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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #45 on: January 08, 2012, 06:13:09 pm »

Nice-looking engine there.  The tramway set-up looks similar to the cross-town link at Porthmadog on the Welsh Highland Railway: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porthmadog_cross_town_link

I was thinking of this loco earlier:

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Angus A Fitziron
Zeppelin Overlord
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United Kingdom United Kingdom

Research Air Ship R.A.S. 'Saorsa'


« Reply #46 on: January 08, 2012, 06:34:42 pm »

Oh yes, a Prussian Glaskasten! I have a mind to build one of those too as it fits into the location of my imaginary steampunk village, but the chassis I have for it is not really suitable (0-6-0 tank) as it drives via the middle set of wheels. I am concerned that removing the rims and spokes from the middle axle and driving the other wheels via rods will result in eratic traction. So that particular project is on the back burner until I can locate a reasonably priced Terrier chassis. All my stock is OO rebodied in 1/35th, so British tanks provide an endless supply of suitable chassis!
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Mécanicien de Vapeur
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



WWW
« Reply #47 on: January 09, 2012, 03:54:09 pm »

I am concerned that removing the rims and spokes from the middle axle and driving the other wheels via rods will result in eratic traction.

Angus,

Assuming a rigid chassis (ie there's no play/compensation/springing on any axle) and provided that's all you do to the middle axle, you should be okay - the O gauge Barclay 06 0-4-0 diesel shunter I mentioned earlier is actually an 0-6-0 with the rear wheelset chopped down to make the flycrank. Because I used 3 identical wheelsets, the fact that the rim and spoked were carved off the rearmost did not affect the critical axle-centre to crankpin distance, which stayed as per the 2 intact wheelsets.

HTH,
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James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #48 on: January 09, 2012, 07:06:10 pm »

If you could find the old Lima J50 or Pannier tank chassis, I think the motor drives the outer axles, so that might be a solution (though I have no first-hand experience of how well that model runs- and heard a few scare stories about it...)
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James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #49 on: January 09, 2012, 09:59:53 pm »

More work on the N5:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Added the spectacle plates to the cab.  Perhaps I should do a bit more of a 'work in progress' series of photos, but to be honest there tends to be so much 'mess' (*that is, tools, glues and materials) lying around when I'm working that the camera would end up either a) one with the model b) ruined by an accident or c) cleared away at the end and put in the bin or modelling box. 

These were made by firstly making a tracing of the cab spectacle plate and transferring this onto 0.5mm plastic sheet.  Two of these were cut, and when cut were checked against each other to make sure that the curvature on top matched... this done I measured the centres of the port openings, which were cut by putting the plastic through a hole punch (!). Unorthodox perhaps but it worked pretty well, especially if the ports have to be perfectly circular. 

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

With that job done I looked to fabricating the tank fronts and tops.  This job was made more complicated because on the N5 the tank tops have a step in them to the rear.... the solution I applied was to cut each piece individually from plastic sheet (4 for each tank- the front, front half of the top, step down, rear half of top), glue those together to form the correct shape on a modelling/ cutting board (one of those with the centimetre square pattern), then cut a rough fifth piece with tank top profile cut into it.  The whole construct of four bits was then attached to this- in effect being a permanently-in-place template holding the whole in shape. 

The next step will be to move to the front of the loco and fabricate the splashers over the leading wheels, some representation of the top of the frames and the saddle for the smokebox. 

 
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