The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
April 19, 2018, 10:45:16 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 [73] 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: James' non-SP model building thread  (Read 121320 times)
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1800 on: December 24, 2017, 01:59:06 pm »









Finished!- just in time for Christmas too. 
Logged

Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #1801 on: December 24, 2017, 03:16:13 pm »









Finished!- just in time for Christmas too. 


Very impressive; those old dreadnaughts had a brutal elegance.

Went to see a friend and show him my restored gauge 1 Coach.
The ine he gave to me as a wreck some months ago.
I had it stripped and re-painted in its original colours.
Missing bits have been replaced.
He was really pleased with the result and......gave me a box containige the wrecks of 3 similar coaches.
Missing bits&pieces everywhere.
Next restoration project.......






















The build looks intersting, but wow, what a collection of oscilloscopes and signal generators! Is that your own collection or a workplaces?

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1802 on: December 24, 2017, 06:36:21 pm »

Thank you.  Quite a lot of Great War equipment has a certain charm or appeal about it- whilst pulling no punches about what it was built to do, the engineers still managed to give it a degree of aesthetic treatment.  This of course was in the era of guns capable of reaching the horizon, being guided by the unaided human eyeball.... a case arguably of effort being spent in the wrong direction. 

I'll be looking at this Mk.1.5 tank next.  It's so close to being a decent model of a Mk.2 that I may as well hackbash it into one- there is a minimal amount of modification necessary.  I'm rather looking forward to it, as I've never tried artillery or armour before.
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1803 on: December 25, 2017, 01:05:02 pm »

Christmas Week Project!

For the last three or four years Christmas Week has seen me build one of the smaller projects out of the to-do list, and as we've been discussing recently the subject for this year is an Airfix WWI tank. 

I started work on it last night and, well, within an hour....





It's quite a nice simple little kit to build.  If you follow the instructions the guns should turn and elevate, however to achieve that there's a lot of relying on friction fit of parts.  That, to my mind, is just begging for one or more bits to fall free loose inside the model and then of course you can't get them out (and if you do get them out you can't get them back inside again).  So I just glued the whole lot up solid. 

The tracks were about the most frustrating part, they're lengths of rubber that you're supposed to form into a band by heating the joint (presumably melting it with a soldering iron or something).  This is an idea I didn't like- I'm not about to damage the iron by getting rubber all over it, also the potential for the tracks to be damaged- and then having formed the continuous band you somehow have to stretch it over the model so you can either wreck the track or slip and smash the model- so I formed them insitu with contact adhesive.  Putting the joint underneath the model effectively masks it. 

Logged
The Bullet
Snr. Officer
****
Germany Germany



« Reply #1804 on: December 25, 2017, 02:41:26 pm »

The build looks intersting, but wow, what a collection of oscilloscopes and signal generators! Is that your own collection or a workplaces?

Yours,
Miranda.

This is my own little lab.
Most equipment was saved from scrap.
During my apprenticeship and my time at university I knew every equipment bin.....
Some units were calibrated and then deemed too old.
Jewels among the collection are R&S LARU and KARU (inductance and capacitance meters) dating frim the sixties.
Still precise as new.
HP 4-channel 100 MHZ scope, 1.3 GHz spectrum analyser,.....all old but good enough for me.
Logged

If brute force does not work....you´re not using enough of it.
Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
Board Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #1805 on: December 25, 2017, 09:16:48 pm »

Christmas Week Project!

For the last three or four years Christmas Week has seen me build one of the smaller projects out of the to-do list, and as we've been discussing recently the subject for this year is an Airfix WWI tank. 

I started work on it last night and, well, within an hour....





It's quite a nice simple little kit to build.  If you follow the instructions the guns should turn and elevate, however to achieve that there's a lot of relying on friction fit of parts.  That, to my mind, is just begging for one or more bits to fall free loose inside the model and then of course you can't get them out (and if you do get them out you can't get them back inside again).  So I just glued the whole lot up solid. 

The tracks were about the most frustrating part, they're lengths of rubber that you're supposed to form into a band by heating the joint (presumably melting it with a soldering iron or something).  This is an idea I didn't like- I'm not about to damage the iron by getting rubber all over it, also the potential for the tracks to be damaged- and then having formed the continuous band you somehow have to stretch it over the model so you can either wreck the track or slip and smash the model- so I formed them insitu with contact adhesive.  Putting the joint underneath the model effectively masks it. 



Very nice. I can't wait to see it painted.
Logged

I made a note in my diary on the way over here. Simply says; "Bugger!"

"DON'T THINK OF IT AS DYING, JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH."
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1806 on: December 26, 2017, 09:15:59 pm »



First coat of paint- Humbrol 117.  Two coats of this, then light dustings of rust and mud tones and some lettering transfers (these will follow next year). 
Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #1807 on: December 27, 2017, 12:11:28 am »


This is my own little lab.
Most equipment was saved from scrap.
During my apprenticeship and my time at university I knew every equipment bin.....
Some units were calibrated and then deemed too old.
Jewels among the collection are R&S LARU and KARU (inductance and capacitance meters) dating frim the sixties.
Still precise as new.
HP 4-channel 100 MHZ scope, 1.3 GHz spectrum analyser,.....all old but good enough for me.

That is an impressive collection! It's really good to see old equipment being given a new lease of life rather than ending up in the trash.



First coat of paint- Humbrol 117.  Two coats of this, then light dustings of rust and mud tones and some lettering transfers (these will follow next year). 

That was quick! Those first generation tanks had such an unmistakable form which to me is more interesting than the more familiar body and turret design. Will it be a standalone or are you planning to diorama it?

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1808 on: December 27, 2017, 11:56:56 am »

There's still a lot of paintwork to do on it but structurally it's finished.  The eventual plan for it is to plinth it on the (unbuilt) layout as a war memorial.  Many of the WWI tanks survived into the early 1940s that way. 
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1809 on: December 27, 2017, 09:20:05 pm »

Ummmmm..... that was quick!  It's finished!  (except for lettering of course). 

Photos tomorrow. 
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1810 on: December 28, 2017, 11:05:06 am »







There we go.  I've also found some punches that I forgot I had so I might have a go later at painting the lettering on.  After that, well I suppose I should get on with the last of the cardboard carriages. 
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1811 on: December 28, 2017, 05:10:30 pm »



And so onto the last of the cardboard carriages.  I'm using up some of the alternative parts for this one, giving it the louvred sides that were fitted to motor cars.  I'm now starting the long and tedious task of cutting out all of the windows and the panelling.  The louvres by comparison should be fairly easy- some plastic strip....

Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1812 on: December 29, 2017, 05:43:47 pm »

Well, all of the windows are now cut out.  Happily the motor compartment utterly consumes the original guard's compartment and one of the passenger compartments- making for three or four fewer windows per side- and now 'all' that needs to be done is to sort out the panelling.  So more fraught cutting of tiny parts.  And that's before I even look at the louvred effect. 

In other news; I used the flash sale on Ebay last night to good effect- I've bought one of these. 



I've got four of these now; three in Great Central livery (although to be fair one of those three is in ersatz GCR livery, being the version applied for preservation in the 1960s).
Logged
The Bullet
Snr. Officer
****
Germany Germany



« Reply #1813 on: December 29, 2017, 09:04:08 pm »

New welding gear operational.
Must buy some 15 x 15 mm angle steel for the next wagon frame.
Logged
Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #1814 on: December 30, 2017, 02:49:41 am »

Australian Special Broadcasting Service (aka SBS1) is running a "slow TV" programme Sunday next - 3 hours (edited down, of course) but uninterrupted by ads - of a run by "The Ghan" train from Adelaide to Darwin - tracks and train. Might be something to have running in the background!
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1815 on: December 31, 2017, 04:55:55 pm »

Progress on the carriage; all windows and panelling cut, sides laminated together.... now onto painting the sides, building the frames, starting the interior....
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1816 on: January 02, 2018, 08:38:57 pm »

Outside panelling painted, underframes being built (underframe cut out, folded up, braced with plastic strip, weights and bogies fitted). 

It is surprising just how much you can achieve spending an hour each evening on a hobby. 
Logged
The Bullet
Snr. Officer
****
Germany Germany



« Reply #1817 on: January 03, 2018, 11:32:22 am »

5" gauge covered wagon:

frames welded up and painted.
buffers, couplings, etc to be fitted today.

Wagon body made
first coat of paint finished
Now all the detailing parts will be added.
Then final coat of paint and lowering onto the frames.

The only part still to be made is the roof (rolled from 3mm sheet steel).
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1818 on: January 06, 2018, 12:09:32 pm »



Carriage underframes; having started with the simple open box structure from the kit (a floor and four sides to fold up), I added a sheet of 0.5mm plastic sheet on top to brace the floor and provide the carriage footboards.  I've also added the couplings (knuckle couplings from the Kadee range, same as now most of my coaching stock) and the buffers (I think these are from the Dart Castings stable- I could be wrong!- but they are intended for British Railways Mk.1 carriages, but don't look out of place for that). 



Now from below; firstly you can see the original cardboard element of the floor and solebars.  Left to its own devices that's not really a very strong structure, so you can see I braced it up with some 2mm square plastic strip running the full length of the carriage down both sides. At the ends, where the buffers and couplings are fitted, I put two of these in (making a 4mm by 2mm block) and then cut the middle out of that to allow a gap for the coupling.  I also drilled 2.4mm holes through the blocks to provide a form footing for the buffers. The bogies are plastic kits by Parkside Dundas intended for one of their long bogie wagon kits; the reason I have used these particular bogies is that the original carriages had very short wheelbases on the bogies (of the order of 5'), which are pretty much impossible to source either as ready-to-run items or as kits.  It is a case of using wagon bogies (which are shorter than carriage bogies), or using carriage bogies with a wheelbase of 8' or so.  Which on a carriage of about 40' length looks pretty ridiculous.  Finally, in the middle of the carriage, are two iron weights of 10 grams each.  These are some of those self-adhesive balancing weights you can buy for balancing car or motorbike wheels. 



Coming up to the bodywork now, you can see how I've used two kits to create the panelling.  I've also used 10mm lengths of 0.5mm square plastic strip to create the louvred vents.  The sides and the roof are drawn as one piece and to create a nice even curve I scored the roof at approximately 2mm centresto induce a curve.  I also know from previous experience that the roof is a little too wide, so I cut a 2mm strip out of it down the centre of the carriage. 



The carriage ends are separate components and fit inside the carriage sides. 



For the interior of the carriage, I am using spare ends from the main kit and otherwise useless parts from the second kit (bought for the panelling) to create the bulkheads between the compartments.  These will be then be painted, and some seats built out of plastic sheet. 
Logged
The Bullet
Snr. Officer
****
Germany Germany



« Reply #1819 on: January 07, 2018, 04:56:13 pm »

2°C outside.

Test run for class 216 after drivetrain upgrade.
Old motors replaced by an assembly of two motors driving a central shaft via reduction gear.
1 Unit --> 2 Motors per bogie.
Two linked motor controllers.
Current limiter set to 120 Amps per bogie.
Starts up much better now.
Much more power at low speeds.
Max speed is the same as before.
Did the first few laps with the sound system switched off in order to check for any mechanical noises. None found.

Success.

To Do:
-replace sheet plexy with "real" windows (with frames, rubber seals,....)
-make metal strips for vents and paint the area in grey

ET 194 11 (Baggage railcar)
Fitted 120 Amp current limiter.
(no more mosfets de-soldering themselves.....)
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1820 on: January 07, 2018, 05:00:57 pm »

It's about the same brass monkey temperature here at the moment.  (More accurately, cold enough for my car to put up a fight starting this afternoon!)

Good work on the 216. 
Logged
Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #1821 on: January 08, 2018, 04:34:58 am »

Storm front & cool change just blowing in - temp dropping from around 44oC to high twenties (hopefully lower!)!
Forgot to watch the slow tv Ghan train trip last night. Hopefully it will be repeated!
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1822 on: January 08, 2018, 08:32:05 pm »

Did anybody catch "The Biggest Little Railway in the World" last night on Channel 4?  An attempt to lay a 32mm gauge railway for 72 miles through Scotland, and then run a live steam engine along it.  Interesting, except for the one host who seems hellbent on rubbing people up the wrong way. 

In other news; both Bachmann and Hornby have announced their 2018 new toolings and I've been contemplating what I'd like to buy.  From Hornby; a con rod nut spanner.  No, that's not a euthamism, or some needlessly confusing railfan speak.  It literally is a little tool for tightening the nuts and bolts on locomotive valvegear.  From Bachmann; maybe a Quarry Hunslet narrow gauge loco.  It would need to be considerably cheaper than the currently-quoted £115 though. 

Now for the on-going project;  the roof is on.  The roof vents are fitted.  The rainstrips are fitted.  The roof has had a coat of paint, and I've started work on the doorhandles. 
Logged
The Bullet
Snr. Officer
****
Germany Germany



« Reply #1823 on: January 08, 2018, 10:43:38 pm »

Next into the workshop: the Super Claud.

*BEEEEEEP* inside valve gear.
One bolt had come loose, slid out halfway, was struck by the expansion link.
Right forward eccentric has shifted position.
*beep* grub screw
*beeeeeep* inaccessible place.

Will take some time to sort out...and even more time to remove anything that keeps me from getting to the parts that need fixing.
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1824 on: January 09, 2018, 08:19:05 pm »

You know when you quietly plug away at something for days with no discernable progress and then suddenly it all starts to come together at once?

Well....

This evening I have

1. Completed painting the roof. 
2. Fitted the doorhandles. 
3. Built the seating. 
4. Painted the seating. 

Which basically leaves fitting the glazing and the seating and securing the body to the chassis....
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 [73] 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.13 seconds with 16 queries.