The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
January 23, 2018, 10:49:39 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 [72] 73 74 75   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: James' non-SP model building thread  (Read 112727 times)
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1775 on: December 14, 2017, 08:56:10 pm »

Looks good.  (I'd recommend some 'proper' track snips to cut the rails back, they make the job so easy!)
Logged

Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1776 on: December 15, 2017, 05:41:45 pm »

Work proceeds on Queen Elizabeth; yesterday night saw the spotting top fitted, the main armament built, and work start on the smokestacks. 

I'm not sure about the mast; I was convinced that the top of it had been struck by 1918 but the instructions say to fit it.  I shall dig out my reprint of the 1919 Janes and check tonight. 



Logged
Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
Board Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #1777 on: December 15, 2017, 07:52:57 pm »

Looks good.  (I'd recommend some 'proper' track snips to cut the rails back, they make the job so easy!)

Thanks for that. I've used a razor saw to cut this track, and it seems to have done the job well enough, but a pair of track cutters would have been more useful, and might invest in some, if I can foresee myself cutting track more often.
Logged

I made a note in my diary on the way over here. Simply says; "Bugger!"

"DON'T THINK OF IT AS DYING, JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH."
Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
Board Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #1778 on: December 16, 2017, 06:00:32 pm »

Well I've been indulging my last opportunity to do some modeling before Christmas (possibly even this year) and I think my little Margate Pug has come out quite nicely.

Taking the factory applied transfers off proved a little annoying (and left a nasty smear on the tanksides which necessitated a coat of matt black) but was achieved with some meths and cotton buds

The mark on the cab gives you an idea of what the smear looked like, but I decided to leave those rather than risk messing up the lining

And here she is in her full BR livery, complete with freight classifications:



The transfers aren't brilliant I know, but this was my first time using them and I'm quite pleased with the results, and I can hide some of the flaws with a bit of weathering. And if I find someone criticising my efforts without proof that they've done the same I shall stab them in the eye with a fishplate!
« Last Edit: December 16, 2017, 06:07:50 pm by Madasasteamfish » Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1779 on: December 16, 2017, 06:24:04 pm »

Transfers.  Welcome to Hell.   Cheesy

Looks rather presentable for a first attempt- my early efforts were woeful.  Are they waterslide, pressfix or methfix?
Logged
Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
Board Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #1780 on: December 16, 2017, 06:34:26 pm »

Transfers.  Welcome to Hell.   Cheesy

Tell me about it, the power classifications were so small I didn't even realise they were actually on the sheet until I looked them up online, even when I knew where they were they took some finding!

Looks rather presentable for a first attempt- my early efforts were woeful.  Are they waterslide, pressfix or methfix?

Thanks, they're HRMS pressfix, my only previous experience with transfers is one attempt at waterslide transfers. The one advantage of doing a project like this where everything is grotty and covered in filth is that it allows you the freedom to hide any mistakes.


Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1781 on: December 16, 2017, 06:40:03 pm »

I generally prefer waterslide, as they're about the easiest to use.  Got it on in the wrong place?  Wet it and you can push it around again.  However I'm very much in the position of having to use whatever is available.... which would be pressfix or nothing!  I usually wet my pressfix down to wash the adhesive off, and then use them much as I would a waterslide transfer- once it is in place and dried off there's usually about enough stickiness left in it to hold it in place whilst I give it a wash of PVA to seal it in. 
Logged
The Bullet
Snr. Officer
****
Germany Germany



« Reply #1782 on: December 17, 2017, 12:44:26 pm »

"New" addition to the fleet.

An old Märklin RS66/13050.
Took a bit to get the old type 66 reversing mechanism going again but now she runs.
Pulls a lot and reverses easily.





Logged

If brute force does not work....you´re not using enough of it.
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1783 on: December 17, 2017, 12:59:47 pm »

I love that!

The very old models, well toys really, they have a real charm to them that today's almost mm-perfect offerings have somehow lost.  I often think that, if I had the room and money, I'd rather like to collect some of the pre-WWI German-made toy trains. 



Like this Carette Great Northern Atlantic



Or this Bing Great Central (what else  Cheesy ) Bogie Pom-Pom
Logged
Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
Board Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #1784 on: December 17, 2017, 06:40:26 pm »

I generally prefer waterslide, as they're about the easiest to use.  Got it on in the wrong place?  Wet it and you can push it around again.  However I'm very much in the position of having to use whatever is available.... which would be pressfix or nothing!  I usually wet my pressfix down to wash the adhesive off, and then use them much as I would a waterslide transfer- once it is in place and dried off there's usually about enough stickiness left in it to hold it in place whilst I give it a wash of PVA to seal it in. 

I'll bear that in mind in future, but I didn't have too many problems using them in the standard 'position and wet, then remove the backing' method. But then again I have picked up a couple of tricks to help with numbering locos (though I did actually mess up one of the crests, and had to replace it).
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1785 on: December 18, 2017, 08:35:25 pm »

A little more work on Queen Elizabeth.  Propellor shafts and rudders fitted.  No.2 smokestack built, complete with 'coffee tin' searchlight platforms.  More deckhouses and small-calibre guns fitted.  Photos will follow once I can get to the camera...
Logged
The Bullet
Snr. Officer
****
Germany Germany



« Reply #1786 on: December 19, 2017, 02:54:05 pm »

As usual, Murphy paid a visit.
One loco started reversing without any trigger.
Investigation showed that one of thr points (one of the less accessible ones of course) was to blame.
One of the blades was not attached to the stretcher any more.
A rivet had broken.
This triggered a short circuit while the loco was moving over ti.
this caused an interruption of the supply voltage and made the type 66 reverser act.
(not good at full speed with a long train....)
Took ages to get the point out, 5 minutes to fix the rivet, then ages again to get the point back in place.
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1787 on: December 19, 2017, 03:15:07 pm »



There we go.  As usual the closer I get to completion the longer the list of jobs becomes!
Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #1788 on: December 19, 2017, 06:43:33 pm »



There we go.  As usual the closer I get to completion the longer the list of jobs becomes!

The last 20% always seems to take 80% of the time... She's looking very handsome already, though.

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1789 on: December 19, 2017, 07:00:39 pm »

At the moment, without the mainmast, she looks remarkably like the [urlhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilean_battleship_Almirante_Latorre]HMS Canada[/url].... and there's only a couple of feet in length and beam in it too.... which is slightly less than nothing at 1/700 scale. 

Pity I've got too many other projects in the pipeline!
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1790 on: December 19, 2017, 08:20:19 pm »



There we go.  As usual the closer I get to completion the longer the list of jobs becomes!

The last 20% always seems to take 80% of the time... She's looking very handsome already, though.

Yours,
Miranda.

Thanks; you can begin to see why I consider this class just about the most graceful dreadnoughts ever built.  The work now is changing from large bits to tiny ones!- much of the remainder of the work now runs to the smaller details like ships boats, anchors and searchlights.  Plus all of the final painting of same- there's always that one point you miss in the the first painting effort. 

Work this evening has run to touching-in of paint on the model (prop shafts and rudders, the funnel caps, searchlights and the odd places where the paint missed) and adding four tiny photo-etched breakwaters around the 6" batteries.  I hate gratuitous photo etch!  It's so awkward and fiddly to build, you need superglue to build it without it coming adrift and even then it tends to stick to the tweezers more readily than the model.  There's not a lot of it on this model thankfully but at the same time there's none on this model that couldn't have been done in plastic instead.   
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1791 on: December 21, 2017, 07:49:26 pm »

Last night I fitted the last of the big items- the mainmast.  Work now basically extends to a range of smaller details.  Mostly, these run to the anchors, the propellors and the ships' boats, all of which are progressing... two, possibly three, short sessions should see the model completed.  They have to be fairly short now because the nature of the work is of a twenty minutes' painting and then twenty hours' drying order. 
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1792 on: December 22, 2017, 05:20:41 pm »

And.... that's now me on holiday for a week or so.  It's somehow become traditional that I turn out a model over Christmas week, well this year it looks like the current project will be finished in time so a slot will be available...

So, what's it to be?

I've narrowed it down to two options. 

1. Airfix 1:72 scale Mk.I tank

Or

2. Repaint of a GWR 43xx 2-6-0 into Railway Operating Division colours, circa 1915-19.

Hmm, choices, choices. 
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1793 on: December 22, 2017, 06:55:47 pm »



There we go!  Mainmast fitted (and then knocked off again, so had to be set up... again....), propellors and anchors added.  That just leaves the boats to fit. 
Logged
Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
Board Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #1794 on: December 22, 2017, 07:35:47 pm »

And.... that's now me on holiday for a week or so.  It's somehow become traditional that I turn out a model over Christmas week, well this year it looks like the current project will be finished in time so a slot will be available...

So, what's it to be?

I've narrowed it down to two options. 

1. Airfix 1:72 scale Mk.I tank

Or

2. Repaint of a GWR 43xx 2-6-0 into Railway Operating Division colours, circa 1915-19.

Hmm, choices, choices. 

I'd reccomend the tank personally. There's something pleasant in starting with a box/bag of bits and coming back some time later to find a complete model.
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1795 on: December 22, 2017, 07:44:23 pm »

The tank has been in the doldrums of the to-do list for a couple of years and would make a nice change.  Meanwhile the loco.... well it's brand new (to me) and only arrived today!  I'd need to not only buy the khaki paint (urgh.  Christmas crowds.), but also try to find some appropriate transfers... the tank might be the better option. 

Logged
Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #1796 on: December 22, 2017, 09:35:08 pm »

I got my brother a model Consolidated Liberator B24, Airfix kit, 1:72, for Christmas! He can paint it out in South East Asia Command colours, and put our dad's numbers on it. He hasn't done/had a model for donkey's years - will keep him out of mischief for a bit!
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1797 on: December 22, 2017, 10:00:28 pm »

Well, this is the next project. 



It's an Airfix 1:76 scale Mk.1 tank.  Ummm, actually.... I say Mk.1, but at the time the kit was moulded (late 1960s) the only example the pattern makers had access to was actually a Mk.2- roughly the same but with a few changes.  So they designed a sort of amalgam early heavy tank- a Mk. 1.5, if you will.  It's basically a Mk.2 with steering wheels to the rear. 

As best as I can tell, that rear axle is about the only element of the kit that makes it a hybrid.  Leave it off and you have, pretty much, a decent model of a Mk.2. 

This particular tank, Lusitania, has an interesting history.  It was named after the Cunard liner torpedoed in May 1915.  It was one of 50 Mk.2's built in 1916/17 which were kept in Britain or training camps in France- early experience with the Mk.1's had shown they had issues, so the Mk.2's were intended as training tanks whilst the Mk.IV/ Mk.V types were developed. 

Later in 1917 however the Mk.2's were actually put into fighting units, to make good losses, and 15 of them fought at the Battle of Arras in April 1917.  Even at this early date (tanks had only first seen combat in the latter half of 1916), the Germans had already developed tactics and armaments that could defeat them and several were lost to armour-piercing bullets (riddle one with bullet holes and even if the tank can still move then it's a good bet the crew have come off a poor second).

Lusitania itself didn't survive Arras- it broke down and was then hit by British artillery.  So say the history books anyway; don't be surprised if in a few years it turns up on Red Lion Square as a war memorial.       
Logged
The Bullet
Snr. Officer
****
Germany Germany



« Reply #1798 on: December 22, 2017, 11:49:08 pm »

Went to see a friend and show him my restored gauge 1 Coach.
The ine he gave to me as a wreck some months ago.
I had it stripped and re-painted in its original colours.
Missing bits have been replaced.
He was really pleased with the result and......gave me a box containige the wrecks of 3 similar coaches.
Missing bits&pieces everywhere.
Next restoration project.......



















« Last Edit: December 23, 2017, 07:35:28 pm by The Bullet » Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #1799 on: December 23, 2017, 09:20:48 pm »

Looking forward to seeing how you get on with those.  There's something quite satisfying about taking a basket case and bringing it back to use. 
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 [72] 73 74 75   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.225 seconds with 15 queries.