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Author Topic: James' non-SP model building thread  (Read 106654 times)
James Harrison
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« Reply #1700 on: October 22, 2017, 02:48:04 pm »

Yes it is rather.  I bought it several years ago as a sort of graduation present to myself when I finished my Masters.  (It's Napoleonic themed. Blue is the French- Napoleon, Empress Josephine, Ney and Grouchy, Red is the Allies- Duke and Duchess of Wellington, Prince of Orange and Blucher). 

I still can't play chess though. 
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Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.
James Harrison
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« Reply #1701 on: October 23, 2017, 06:50:16 pm »

Onto the next project!- another of those cardboard carriage kits I started over the Summer.  You may recall back in June / July I built two, then decided that the heat of the Summer was not conducive to the material and adhesives. Well, it's cooler now so lets get on with the remaining pair. 

As I'm dog-sitting tonight I'm not exactly in a position to break out knives, glues etc.... so tonight's task looks likely to be to weather the delivery lorry I finished yesterday.  Chalk pastels being less of a problem when doggy comes sniffing around. 

Also; another day another project.  (This one is probably in the realms of Steampunk)..... a 1/350 scale kit of the Royal Navy's last pre-dreadnought.  HMS Lord Nelson of 1908, 4 12" and 10 9.2" guns..... lovely! 



Which reminds me, I still have that 1/700 HMS Queen Elizabeth to build too....
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The Bullet
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« Reply #1702 on: October 23, 2017, 09:19:47 pm »

Work started on the Loriot.
Made two buffer beams.
There was only one but it was too thin and had more holes than Swiss cheese.
Frame parts have been clamped together and are ready for welding.

I still need two coupling hooks with three-link chain coupling and some axle boxes.

The angles between frame and deck, although flimsy, will be re-used.
The wooden deck will be scrapped and made from scratch.
The dimensions of the old one seem to fit anything but this wagon.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1703 on: October 24, 2017, 05:02:01 pm »

Work started on the Loriot.
Made two buffer beams.
There was only one but it was too thin and had more holes than Swiss cheese.
Frame parts have been clamped together and are ready for welding.

I still need two coupling hooks with three-link chain coupling and some axle boxes.

The angles between frame and deck, although flimsy, will be re-used.
The wooden deck will be scrapped and made from scratch.
The dimensions of the old one seem to fit anything but this wagon.

I remember you showing us the photos of that in original condition; the deck looked very odd and parts of the frame being missing.  Good luck with it!
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The Bullet
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« Reply #1704 on: October 27, 2017, 12:11:10 pm »

Frame welded. New buffer beams welded to it.
Now it is off to the other department.
(A friend will make the axle bearings).
Hook&chain couplings have been odered.
In the meantime I will do some work on the 216.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1705 on: October 29, 2017, 10:09:33 am »

Well, the lorry is finished. 









Progress on the third of the cardboard ex-Metropolitan Ashbury coaches:

-Underframes and bogies built and painted;
-Windows cut out;
-Panelling cut out and fitted;
-Sides painted. 

Until I'm at a stage where I can cut out the sides and start gluing it all together, there's a lot of progress of the 'work for 20 minutes and leave it for a day' sort, as it's mostly painting. 
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Banfili
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« Reply #1706 on: October 29, 2017, 02:40:02 pm »

And very smart it looks, too!
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The Bullet
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« Reply #1707 on: October 29, 2017, 02:45:22 pm »

216 update

Bogie upgrade finished. Two motors for each bogie.
Just put them back under the loco and made sure both bogies run the same way.
(would not pull too much otherwise)
Now I will have to split the Control wiring.
I am planning to usw one controller per bogie. So the controllers will not get too warm.
Still do not know how fast she will go and what she will pull.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1708 on: October 29, 2017, 05:05:47 pm »

And very smart it looks, too!

That's after it's been weathered and dirtied up!  Cheesy  Sitting in the little plastic box it came in now waiting for a diorama I'm supposed to be building springs into existence. 
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Banfili
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« Reply #1709 on: October 30, 2017, 03:46:05 am »

It looks like a hard-working little truck!
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The Bullet
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« Reply #1710 on: October 30, 2017, 12:29:11 pm »

216: Controllers wired up.
Tested: OK.
Put the loco back together
System test,
Motor circuits: OK
Lichts: OK
Sound: GAAAAAAAAAAAH!

Somehow the sound module does not work any more.
Loco wiring is OK, amplifier and speakers work.
So she´s still not finished.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1711 on: November 02, 2017, 07:14:47 pm »

Hmm, yes. This latest cardboard kit. 

Truth be told, it's not going quite so well as the previous two.  The sides were cut pretty well, the panelling to the ends though perhaps less so.  So I had to make new ends.  Then the roof refused to fit neatly, so that needed attention.  The glue tended to pool in quite obvious places and has had to be removed once it had dried, which took some of the material with it, leaving rough areas which have then needed to be put right again. 

Happily I think I am over the worst of it.  The underframes are almost finished, except for the trussing, the body is now built, which just leaves the interior and the glazing, so I'm well over the halfway point. 

However I think this project will be put aside again for a little while once this carriage is finished, in favour of some more covered vans- two more of which have recently arrived. 
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The Bullet
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« Reply #1712 on: November 06, 2017, 06:20:28 pm »

216:
Sound module fixed.
Just the amplifier IC (TDA7052B) was shot.
In order to save time when the next fault turns up I built a testing box
It has a long vable with that special connector (2mm pinning instead of 2.54mm), some sockets, switches and pushbuttons for a quick and easy test on the bench.
Now it just has to go back into the loco.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1713 on: November 07, 2017, 02:42:12 pm »

Cardboard carriage #3 finished. Great Central vans #4 and #5 finished. GCR vans #6 and #7 to start tonight.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1714 on: November 07, 2017, 09:00:06 pm »

Right, okay.  I've been without convenient internet access for the last four days and my 'phone isn't great either, hence the silence.  But we're back up and working now!- for a given value of 'working', so I can bring you all up to date. 

I have completed the third of the cardboard carriage kits.  There were several times when I honestly thought it would end up in the bin.  Even now it's not quite as good as the other two.  It looks 'okay' from a distance of about 3 feet, and it is only that attribute which has saved it.  It will, I feel, be quite some time before I look at the fourth and last carriage in that set. 

Now since finishing that carriage I have once again turned my attention to covered vans.  You may recall back in September I repainted a trio of ready-to-run wagons and I mentioned that I had another two to look at.  Well, I've had a look at them and in the space of three days I've repainted them and added three-link couplings.  This now gives me a train of five Great Central-liveried covered vans.  I've also bought a pair of covered vans of the same design as kits (£20 for one van versus £18 for two identical vans that you have to build.... which would you choose?).  I could build them and add them to the same train but the fact of their being kits means I can do something a little different. 

The ready to run vans which I have previously repainted are all vacuum braked.  Incredible though it may sound, right up until the 1960s the vast majority of freight wagons in the UK were only fitted with a handbrake.  There was a reason for this with coal wagons- most of them were privately owned by collieries- but then the fact that open coal and mineral wagons formed the vast majority of freight rolling stock also provided an excuse for railway companies to follow suit.  Why fit your own freight stock with (expensive) automatic brakes if for most journeys it will be coupled up with handbraked stock limited to 15 to 20 miles per hour?  Far better (for shareholders) to be content with handbrakes only and accept the idea of plodding freight trains going nowhere in a hurry. 

This contrasts with passenger carriages, which by law have had to be fitted with an automatic brake since 1889 (in the wake of an horrendous accident to an excursion train in Ireland, when 10 heavily loaded carriages overwhelmed the capability of a handbrake applied in only one carriage, ran away down a hill, and slammed into a following train).

So since the 1880s there was a break between passenger and freight rolling stock in terms of how they were braked and how quickly they could be run.  Which is fine if all of the freight is coal, minerals or general merchandise which can be moved around slowly and take days in transit. 

But what if the freight you're expected to carry is fish, or fruit, parcels, or the like?  It needs to be moved in a hurry or it will arrive useless.  So even from the 1890s the freight stock itself began to be split up, some of it was vacuum braked, some of it just had a vacuum pipe so it could be used in fast freight trains, and most of it remained without an automatic brake at all.     

Now obviously this could lead to absolute chaos- or carnage.  It led to a complicated rulebook dictating several types or classes of freight train which broadly went from unfitted (ie- handbrake only) wagons limited to plodding along at 15 mph, via a series of complicated arrangements of unfitted and fitted stock in the same train (eg the front of the train being composed of vacuum braked wagons, and the rear of the train being unfitted wagons limited in number to a ratio of fitted: unfitted stock), which could be run a little faster, through to fully-fitted goods trains (all stock vacuum braked) which could be run at near express speeds. 

For the modeller then this confused mess presents the opportunity to run things like a real railway, and in the much same vein as you might split up your locomotive collection into various duty rosters so as to not end up with a shunter pulling a crack named express you could split up the goods stock into fitted and unfitted sets and actually marshal trains with a modicum of logic and adherence to prototype practice- which is what I'm trying to do. 

So what I'm now working toward is deciding how much of my goods stock should be, or is going to be, in vacuum braked condition, and how much will be left with just a handbrake.  I think it will be quite interesting being able to run an express goods train or two amidst a general melee of slower freight. 
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The Bullet
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« Reply #1715 on: November 08, 2017, 08:26:14 am »

Sound module back in the rear cab of class 216.
Loco is about 1.4 metres long but....not much space inside.
Now everything is in place and she has moved under her own power again on the test track.
Not I am waiting for good weather to give her a real test on my track and attach some load to see how the new motor/gearbox sets will perform.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1716 on: November 09, 2017, 07:48:09 pm »

Progress on some kits for covered vans; I have built both of them (for a given value of built).  Bodywork done, chassis built up, first coats of paint applied.  I am holding off fitting the brakegear until the paintwork is finished- this I learned from repainting the ready-to-run vans!- so the general hope is that by the beginning of next week I should have these two finished. 

Being on the hunt for more cheap rolling stock, I've managed to pick up another pair of Dapol cattle wagons for about £8 each.  This will, ultimately, give me a cattle train of seven vehicles.  Plus the brakevan, plus the locomotive gives me a train length of.... let me think a moment.... a little over three feet (4" per van plus say 9" for an 0-6-0 goods engine).  Yes, I think that should about answer my needs.  Current plans suggest a maximum possible goods train length of fifteen vehicles and then of course factor in that track layouts were almost always two or three times the length of a maximum anticipated train, well.... 
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The Bullet
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« Reply #1717 on: November 12, 2017, 03:15:54 pm »

A freind brought some fullsize loco parts. Pressure gauges for Boiler, Heating, Pump and Brake, many signs,.....

Yesterday I found a piece of flat steel about 5mm thick, drilled 4 holes of 24mm (!) diameter, welded some supports to it and today the pressure gauges took their new place on the wall:



Still need to clean all the signs and put them up also.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1718 on: November 12, 2017, 05:26:58 pm »

Oh, marvellous!

I was at the AGM of the new-build project I support yesterday.  Lots of loco bits on display but sadly none to bring home with me!
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1719 on: November 13, 2017, 08:51:58 pm »

The last few nights I have spent seeing if it is possible to convert the venerable 1950s Airfix (now Dapol) cattle wagon kit into a typical Great Central cattle van. (It better be, I've got seven of them to do!)



Now you start off with something like this.



And you're aiming for something like this. 

The strapping is the right pattern but the wrong material.  The doors are quite, quite wrong.  The overall length, width and height are good matches but there are specific details that need to be altered.  Well, I started with the one cattle wagon that I had built many years ago on the basis that if I can get this one looking right then the others (still in flat packed condition) should be a doddle by comparison. 

I think I've about managed it.  I'll just need to order in more 0.5mm strip.  A lot more 0.5mm strip. 

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James Harrison
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« Reply #1720 on: November 15, 2017, 06:06:54 pm »



Top: The third of the cardboard carriage kits. 

Second down: Cattle van that I have been altering.  As a proof-of-concept model I'm happy with it.  But considering how because it was already built there are certain compromises, and because it was built badly it's rather twisted, I think once I've got fairly underway with the six unbuilt kits I'll be scrapping this one. 

Third and fourth: Covered vans from the Parkside kits.  Looking for more of these.
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Will Howard
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« Reply #1721 on: November 15, 2017, 07:20:16 pm »

  But considering how because it was already built there are certain compromises, and because it was built badly it's rather twisted, I think once I've got fairly underway with the six unbuilt kits I'll be scrapping this one. 

[/quote]

Instead of scrapping it, how about a diorama of a damaged wagon BEING scrapped (or repaired?)
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1722 on: November 15, 2017, 08:31:30 pm »

It would have been done at a carriage or wagon works.  Which were huge compounds which I don't really have the space to model....

It will either get scrapped, or, once the other six have been built, very carefully dismantled and rebuilt properly. 

This evening's work has consisted of finishing the paintwork on the two van kits, which was basically painting the brakegear.  I then moved on to a quintet of four-wheeled carriages that arrived yesterday.  Earlier this year I built (or rebuilt) five old four-wheel carriages, giving some of them six-wheel chassis.  Last week another five of the same type turned up on Ebay. 

They had already been built and very nicely finished in Great Central teak livery, three of them had new chassis fitted and the other pair have the parts for new chassis (one of the new chassis is already built and just needs to be fitted). 

About the only thing needing doing to them is to build these two new chassis and fit my favoured buckeye couplings.  As an easy start then I fitted buckeye couplings to the three that are otherwise ready to go. 
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The Bullet
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« Reply #1723 on: November 16, 2017, 07:55:45 am »

In many small German depots there was always the one wagon......
Sometimes found at the end of a track near or behind the loco shed, sometimes beside the rails with their wheels removed and used as mess room, oil store, parts store,...
Maybe you could use it for that purpose. Might look good.
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Madasasteamfish
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09madasafish
« Reply #1724 on: November 16, 2017, 11:47:32 am »

In many small German depots there was always the one wagon......
Sometimes found at the end of a track near or behind the loco shed, sometimes beside the rails with their wheels removed and used as mess room, oil store, parts store,...
Maybe you could use it for that purpose. Might look good.

The repurposing of old coaches and wagons for use as mess rooms or tool sheds was a common practice in the UK as well (usually because it was quicker and cheaper than building a more permanent structure). However, given the openness of a cattle wagon I can't see one being used in that purpose (it'd be too drafty for a mess hut and not dry or secure enough for a store).

The likeliest such use for a cattle wagon would much more likely be as some form of agriculture outbuilding, say a chicken coop.
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