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Author Topic: What Are You Reading? (Mk. II)  (Read 91491 times)
Banfili
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« Reply #1900 on: March 26, 2017, 10:39:08 pm »

Just luck, James!
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Angus A Fitziron
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« Reply #1901 on: March 30, 2017, 09:29:46 am »

The Secret of Abdu El Yezdi by Mark Hodder. I waited until a few books were available before launching back into the Burton - Swinburne sagas which began with The Strange Affair of Spring Heeled Jack, The Curious Case of the Clockwork Man and Expedition to the Mountains of the Moon. The current book is followed by The Discontinued Man and the series ends (allegedly) with The Rise of the Automated Aristocrats, so six books in all. The series features Richard Francis Burton, explorer, and Algernon Charles Swinburne, poet - both of whom were actually infamous in the middle C19th and so had they teamed up to solve curious, time warping crimes and political intrigues within the full panoply of Victorian weirdness, then these books would be it!

The books do tend to depend on previous stories to create the full experience, so best read in order and within your memory span, hence me dividing them up into two halves!

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« Reply #1902 on: April 05, 2017, 06:56:22 pm »

I have, this last weekend, read Lyra's Oxford and Once Upon A Time in the North, both short stories in Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials universe.  Now I have nothing more to read in that vein, until October at least. 

My current read then is Stephen Baxter's Massacre of Mankind, the official sequel to The War of the Worlds.   
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« Reply #1903 on: April 28, 2017, 04:51:57 am »

Picked up a used foreign language "academic novel" (the kind of thing they make people read for High School/College foreign language courses, or whatever the PC term is these days), entitled El Husar, by Arturo Perez-Reverte. Perhaps I'll be able to get back to reading Espanol like I used to...
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« Reply #1904 on: May 13, 2017, 12:29:12 pm »

Since early April then,I have read the 'official' sequel to The War of the Worlds- Stephen Baxter's Massacre of Mankind, which I didn't much care for.  Everything that I personally found appealing about Wells' novel was missing from it.  I then went on to re-read some Connie Willis- Time is the Fire and Passage- and now I am reading H L Mencken's Prejudices series, which at the moment I am finding fairly hardgoing, the first book in the series seemingly devoted to literary criticism.  Considering these books were written in the late 1910s/ early 1920s, and that the authors and books he is criticising are complete unknowns, I'm finding it difficult to understand the work.  Holding judgement on that one then until I'm further in. 
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« Reply #1905 on: May 15, 2017, 11:05:08 am »

Currently reading books for uni including Research for Fashion Design and The Fundamentals of Fashion Management. Also reading The Secret History for pleasure.
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Banfili
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« Reply #1906 on: May 15, 2017, 11:26:28 am »

You really don't want to know .... All right, I'll tell you! Journal articles like this "What lies beneath: Thinking about the qualities and essences of stone and wood in the chambered tomb architecture of Neolithic Britain and Ireland"

Everybody's favourite, right?
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morozow
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« Reply #1907 on: May 15, 2017, 05:11:50 pm »

Koshko, Arkadii Frantsevich "Sketches of the criminal world of the tsarist Russia"

The head of the Moscow police detective, and later was in charge of the criminal investigation of the Russian Empire.

A great result was given by A. F. Koshko, a new system of identification based on a special classification of anthropometric and fingerprint data. Moscow spying for his photographic, anthropometric, fingerprint offices created extremely accurate criminal file. Later this system was adopted by Scotland Yard. When the revolution General koshko was forced to flee from Russia, the British asked him to head they have a research Department. The Moscow period in the life of A. F. Koshko brought him fame, awards and a new increase.

In his memoirs, the cats describe their most high-profile investigation. This is a short dynamic stories.

Very funny and interesting to read.

Old people, old characters. Now there are none. Although, maybe the old language turns all of this.

And it seems to be part of the author added to the beauty of a syllable.

I read these memoirs, after reread Sherlock Holmes. Funny contrast a complex situation and reasoning of Holmes and ease of short stories the Koshko.
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« Reply #1908 on: May 17, 2017, 05:14:01 pm »

Reading a lot of Cthulhu mythos stories at the moment
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Banfili
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« Reply #1909 on: May 18, 2017, 12:49:33 am »

Which reminds me - picked up a copy of H P Lovecraft's 'The Call of Cthulhu', No.16 in the Pocket Penguin Classics (reprint, of course), orange cover, a couple of months ago. Bookgrocer was selling stuff off for $5.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1910 on: May 20, 2017, 08:49:36 pm »

I'm still, slowly, ploughing through HL Mencken's Prejudices.  I've finished the first, and begun the second, so progress is being made...

Today I went into Birmingham and came home with another three books.

- A compendium volume of Alice in Wonderland, Alice Through the Looking Glass and Alice's Adventures Underground;
- The sequel (I guess you could call it) to the above, After Alice;
and
- The Woodhead Route. 
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morozow
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« Reply #1911 on: May 26, 2017, 03:22:19 pm »

Read the memoirs of academician Likhachev.

The Chapter about the Siege of Leningrad.... It was just awful. Hundreds of thousands of people dying and dead from starvation. The details of this...

Compresses the heart.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1912 on: June 10, 2017, 09:57:28 pm »

Finished the sixth, and final, Prejudices by H L Mencken.  Taken as a full set in one go, they're an ordeal.  A series of articles and essays taking potshots at the social mores of his time- roughly 1915-1930- so we're talking American involvement in the Great War, Prohibition, Creationism vs Evolution, bigotry and racism, religious fundamentalism, the slackjaw awfulness of politicians, the ignorance of the general public, the shortage of good literature..... heavy stuff.  Not helped in the least that he was writing in the 1920s for an audience of the 1920s- and assuming an acquaintance of the state of play at that time.  

So it's difficult to get a handle on the specifics he's discussing.  Sadly not the basics though.  If I've learnt anything from ploughing through the approximately 1,000 pages the complete series comprises, it's that things in the world really haven't changed in the last 90 years.  Amd if that doesn't make you want to give it all up and open a vein right here right now, I don't know what will.  
« Last Edit: June 10, 2017, 10:01:53 pm by James Harrison » Logged
Cora Courcelle
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« Reply #1913 on: June 12, 2017, 03:29:45 pm »

Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray.
I've never actually read this and am enjoying it immensely, although I am tending to read the 'moral' paragraphs quite quickly.
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« Reply #1914 on: June 18, 2017, 11:45:29 am »

These last few days I have been reading Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland, Through the Looking Glass and Alice's Adventures Underground.  The edition I have has the original John Tenniel illustrations, which are a mix of childish whimsy and (to my mind) horror.  There's one (well, two actually) of a little girl going into/ coming out of a mirror- shades of The Ring.  



Actually, a quasi-Victorian whimsihorrific story.  I'd read/ watch that.  
« Last Edit: June 18, 2017, 11:48:56 am by James Harrison » Logged
Angus A Fitziron
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« Reply #1915 on: June 21, 2017, 11:12:25 am »

A brief pause in books whilst I got immersed in some periodicals about the polar and other exploratory long distance flights that took place at the end of WWII and into the first few years of the Cold War. Fascinating stuff - I don't know if this is material coming to the surface with release of secrets after the 50 year policy.

Now back to steampunk and reading The Rise Of The Automated Aristocats!
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1916 on: July 11, 2017, 07:57:21 pm »

"Iron, Ornament and Architecture in Victorian Britain" has been my reading material for the last few days.  Next up is "Mrs Pooter's Diary" to be followed variously by a biography of H H Munro, a work on Nottinghamshire market towns 1680- 1840, and a little volume on the works of Watson Fothergill. 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1917 on: August 04, 2017, 09:50:54 pm »

Well...

"Mrs Pooter's Diary" was a humourous little book and highly recommended.  The Hector Hugh Munro biography was enlightening; the real pleasure though were the six examples of his uncollected short stories.  Then I ploughed into "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man" by James Joyce.  With the exception of "Dubliners", I always struggle with Joyce.  It seemed a long book with precious little happening, although unlike "Ulysses" it was actually readable from beginning to end.  So now I'm reading "The Pre-Raphaelite Tragedy" and intend to follow that up with Max Beerbohm's "Zuleika Dobson". 
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Banfili
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« Reply #1918 on: August 04, 2017, 10:54:49 pm »

Three chapters from books on the British & Irish Neolithic sent to me via DropBox by my dissertation supervisor - Sigh!
Not as if I didn't have enough to read as it is! Tongue Shocked
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1919 on: August 27, 2017, 10:55:00 am »

"The Pre-Raphaelite Tragedy" by William Gaunt was a splendid read.  "Zuleika Dobson"?- a rather witty satirical look at Edwardian Oxford, although the titular character is the sort of blockhead that seems almost intended to rub me up the wrong way. 

I'm currently reading "News From Nowhere" and other writings by William Morris. 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1920 on: September 20, 2017, 05:04:18 pm »

My current read is "They and I" by Jerome K. Jerome.  Then I have "Those Were The Days" by AA Milne to plough through.  Mmmm, 800-odd pages of essays from Edwardian Punch.  Lovely. 
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« Reply #1921 on: September 21, 2017, 10:14:08 am »

eltman, the novel "The wanderer".

A strange creation. Hard to read, if you think at the same time. We should not think Smiley

I would say that the novel is written in the genre - impressionnisme. 30 years before the advent of impressionism in painting.

This novel memory, novel mental journey. Need to relax and enjoy the images and paintings appears in the brain when reading. Well, or to suffer from the jumble of words, when the image does not occur.

P.S. I thought it was funny how the author changed with age.

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James Harrison
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« Reply #1922 on: October 25, 2017, 08:22:12 pm »

If you can find a copy of it, I can highly recommend AA Milne's Those were the Days.  If you can't..... well there is a condensed version of it called Happy Days that can be downloaded for free as an audiobook from Librivox*. 
My current reading slushpile looks a little something like this:

-Anno Dracula 1899 and Other Stories by Kim Newman
-One Thousand Monsters by Kim Newman
-Book of Dust by Philip Pullman

This last I'm deliberately keeping to the bottom of the pile.  I don't much care for an author who denigrates others not alive to defend themselves. 

*Other audiobook vendors exist
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« Reply #1923 on: November 01, 2017, 09:41:22 am »

Almost finished verne's 5 weeks in a balloon  Cheesy
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