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Author Topic: What Are You Reading? (Mk. II)  (Read 92448 times)
GCCC
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« Reply #1775 on: March 16, 2016, 09:00:28 pm »

Just finished Tea Krulos' Monster Hunters: On the Trail with Ghost Hunters, Bigfooters, Ufologists, and Other Paranormal Investigators. There's kind of a sad honesty to it.

I don't live close enough to a library to have a card without getting charged, the librarians at the library next to my work probably think I'm hiding from someone and afraid I'll leave a digital/paper trail (since I've also never asked to use their Wi-Fi and don't have smartphone).

So that's why we haven't been able to track you. Time for some good old-fashioned shoe leather, then...  Wink
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« Reply #1776 on: March 16, 2016, 09:03:48 pm »

Just completed Tolstoys Anna Karenina and really enjoyed it; having never even watched the movie (any version of the movie) I had only a vague idea of the story and was pleasantly surprised that it wasn't just about Anna and Vronsky.  Who knows, I may try War and Peace again - I've never managed to get very far with it although I have tried several times!

I've had that problem every time I've attempted to get through Moby Dick. I understand there's a rather cracking adventure tale buried somewhere in that doctoral thesis on whaling...
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Angus A Fitziron
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« Reply #1777 on: March 16, 2016, 09:53:32 pm »

Not much steamy reading lately - I read the latest Haruki Murakami "Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage" - and decided that it was about time I re-read the back catalogue.

However, a wander round The Works nabbed a couple of books with SP appeal - Peril On The Royal Train by Edward Marston and Dreaming Spies by Laurie R King. Now, I have read a number of the 'steam detective' Jim Stringer stories by Andrew Martin and found them entertaining and well written, so I was perhaps expecting more from Marston's 'Railway Detective'. The story was so so and the characters seemed reasonably well written, but I felt that I was being fed information about railways that didn't add to my enjoyment or was pertinent to the plot! I am unlikely to return to the Railway Detective novels anytime soon.

On the other hand, I really liked Dreaming Spies. If you aren't aware of the series plot line, Sherlock Holmes marries a much younger woman, Mary Russell and they continue to solve crimes together. I really didn't want to like this book, given the impossible task of following in Doyles foot steps, but actually it wasn't all that bad! The book was elegantly written, had an engaging plot with Agatha Christie like twists and turns and the detail (which was extensive) all contributed to the richness of the story. Even though this is the thirteenth book in the series, I had no difficulty picking up on the relationship between the two key players and their supporting cast. So, time to begin - 12 books to get through - where's my library ticket?
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« Reply #1778 on: March 17, 2016, 07:41:26 am »

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.
I'm currently rereading Calle Anderson by Sofia Rhei and Marian Womack.

It's a children's book telling the adventures of Kay and Gerda (the Snow Queen) and their adventures after they return from the Snow Queen's realm, set in a steampunk Copenhagen.
A good read!

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily

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Cora Courcelle
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« Reply #1779 on: March 17, 2016, 09:56:57 am »


On the other hand, I really liked Dreaming Spies. If you aren't aware of the series plot line, Sherlock Holmes marries a much younger woman, Mary Russell and they continue to solve crimes together. I really didn't want to like this book, given the impossible task of following in Doyles foot steps, but actually it wasn't all that bad! The book was elegantly written, had an engaging plot with Agatha Christie like twists and turns and the detail (which was extensive) all contributed to the richness of the story. Even though this is the thirteenth book in the series, I had no difficulty picking up on the relationship between the two key players and their supporting cast. So, time to begin - 12 books to get through - where's my library ticket?

Yes, I've been a fan of these for quite a while and have read nearly all of them; I like the way the stories balance the protagonists view points and somehow still feel as if Holmes could have done this.
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« Reply #1780 on: March 17, 2016, 11:53:49 pm »

I have been exceedingly busy lately and often unable to sleep, so I downloaded an ebook onto the kindle app on my phone so I could read without turning on the light and waking my partner. I've never read David Copperfield before but I'm really enjoying it so far, I forgot how much I enjoy Dickens...
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« Reply #1781 on: March 19, 2016, 02:44:03 pm »

I'm currently enjoying a nice long slog through 'The Pickwick Papers'. 

After that is done, I have an original 1927 copy of 'The Chronicles of Boulton's Siding' to peg into. 
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« Reply #1782 on: March 20, 2016, 08:39:55 pm »

I am once again galloping my way through the 12 'Flashman' novels and I'm enjoying them just as much as I did the first time around.

While his victorian attitudes will upset some 21st century moralists, the depth of adventure, rude humour and historical accuracy are difficult to beat.

No, it's not real steampunk ... but his 'brass neck' and 'steamy encounters with brazen hussies' would put it higher up the list than some 'steampunk' I've read.

I highly recommend them.

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James Harrison
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« Reply #1783 on: March 23, 2016, 09:31:36 pm »

Yesterday, whilst waiting for a connection at Birmingham New Street, I was able to pick up a small book of H G Wells' short stories, none of which I had read before...

The Sea Raiders (1896)- The Devon coast attacked by a shoal of Humboldt squid. 
The Land Ironclads (1903)- Trench warfare, suddenly broken by tanks the size of battleships. 
The Magic Shop (1903)- Literally, a magic shop. 

It was an enjoyable quick read (less than 60 pages, and kept me occupied for maybe 45 minutes on a long train journey), and well worth the £1 I paid for it. 
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creagmor
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« Reply #1784 on: March 24, 2016, 03:55:08 am »

A few days ago I read H R Haggard's Allen Quatermain. Obviously League of Extraordinary Gentlemen was a mishmash, but in the book he dies form a wound sustained in battle, and was cremated. So much for "Africa will never let me die". BTW, in the book. his son died of smallpox and was buried in England. Oh well, I guess that's what they call artistic licence.    
« Last Edit: March 25, 2016, 07:54:11 am by creagmor » Logged

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« Reply #1785 on: March 24, 2016, 09:40:14 am »

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.
In honour of J.S. Bach's birthday, I've just finished rereading Douglas Adam's romp, Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1786 on: March 25, 2016, 02:37:48 pm »

Another small book, again picked up waiting for a connecting train the other day. 

"Trivia, or the Art of Walking the Streets of London" by John Gay (1716). 
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Inflatable Friend
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« Reply #1787 on: March 25, 2016, 02:52:11 pm »

H.G. Wells, War of the Worlds. Again.

Not just for fun this time though, this time it's with highlighter and notepad for research.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1788 on: March 26, 2016, 01:54:34 pm »

I'm about 100 pages off the end of 'The Pickwick Papers', which I started about three (four?) weeks ago. 

Today I went and bought "Dombey and Son" and "A Tale of Two Cities". 
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creagmor
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« Reply #1789 on: March 27, 2016, 04:03:41 pm »

last night I read The Moneypenny Diaries, Her Last Fling. I loaned it to someone so I don't have it at present, but I think the author is Kate Wentworth. A very good read about some mysterious events that lead to her death, just short of 60. It's all about her, and her niece who received Jane's diaries exactly 10 years after her death at sea.

the plot involves an informant high up in the Secret Intelligence Service.  JB only appears a couple of times in the story, and then only in a minor roll. there is a surprise at the end that you must solve for yourself.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1790 on: March 28, 2016, 04:16:27 pm »

I am currently reading 'The Chronicles of Boulton's Siding', which was originally published in 1927 (the date of my copy) and reprinted in the early 1970s. 

If anybody wants to build a model of weird and wonderful Victorian railway engines I advise you to get a copy....





There are scale drawings of 60+ engines like this.
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Caledonian
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« Reply #1791 on: March 28, 2016, 04:38:50 pm »

death in the victorian family, grief and mourning in the 19th century

...
all interesting, but this is the 4th time as I can't find the info I'm looking for
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« Reply #1792 on: April 02, 2016, 03:53:37 pm »

Beyond the Rails by Jack Tyler

Interesting series of books (along with Beyond the Rails II) positing an airship working in Africa during the Victorian era.  Tyler has done his homework on the era and the clash of cultures involved, and the novels are an engrossing read.
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« Reply #1793 on: April 02, 2016, 08:28:57 pm »

Halfway through Hollow City, but also reading Treasure Island for University
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« Reply #1794 on: April 03, 2016, 07:25:59 am »

Good morning. ladies and gentlemen.
I found an edition of the complete Narnian Chronicles with the original illustrations by Pauline Baynes and I'm currently enjoying The Horse and his Boy.

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily

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creagmor
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« Reply #1795 on: April 03, 2016, 03:39:07 pm »

It would seem as though I have the same book, if the stories are in chronological order, rather than in the sequence they were published. Finished Voyage of The Dawn Treader last night.   
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1796 on: April 03, 2016, 05:23:22 pm »

Currently reading Dombey and Son.  After that I have A Two Cities and High Rise to read. 
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« Reply #1797 on: April 03, 2016, 05:30:04 pm »

A series of rather informative papers on lasers. Sci-fi is now spoiled for me forever.
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« Reply #1798 on: April 13, 2016, 05:09:56 pm »

Benjamin Franklin in London - by George Goodwin.

I only came to know of this book because I met Mr. Goodwin at a Historians group I frequent in a very nice public house in London.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #1799 on: May 06, 2016, 08:31:27 pm »

I've just finished Dombey and Son.  Next up is High Rise
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