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Author Topic: Learning basic watch/clockmaking  (Read 6743 times)
Captain MacMorrigan
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« on: January 28, 2011, 03:39:14 am »

While I don't consider myself to be a total  noob when it comes to steampunk, I will  freely admit that I am still relatively new at all this.  So, I naturally ran out into the streets (and by streets I mean Ebay) and purchased a bunch of old watch parts.  It was only after getting them and looking at them all, that I realized I have virtually no idea how to put any of it together.  I don't need to make a functioning watch, but I would like to at least arrange it so that I could turn them by hand and not have them just wobble and fall off.  How does one go about learning this?  It could be as simple as how to secure gears in place in a disassembled watch (however actually simple or complicated that maybe).
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Captain Shipton Bellinger
Master Tinkerer
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Why the goggles..? In case of ADVENTURE!


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« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2011, 08:11:31 am »

Rather than start with a miscellaneous collection of watch parts, your best bet is begin with a working clock that you don't mind destroying.

Carefully disassemble it, making copious notes (including photographic) during the process. Lay out the parts in the order that you remove them, preferrably in a clean, secure compartmentalised tray.

Once disassembled you can clean (if necessary) and reassemble the clock in the reverse order that you took it apart.

Advantages of starting with working clocks:
Clocks are much larger, and therefore easier to work on, than watches.
You know that you have all the necessary parts of a working timepiece.
You can actually see how the parts fit and work together before you start.
You can generally get away with a far less specialised set of tools.

There are some rather good diy clock-repair sites out there on the Ætherwebs. a quick Google session should return several. I'll see if I can find one or two of the better ones when I have a minute to spare.

PS Take care when dismounting the main spring - even when fully unwound it can launch small parts into the darker recesses of your work area.

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Capt. Shipton Bellinger R.A.M.E. (rtd)

Captain Shipton Bellinger
Master Tinkerer
***
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Why the goggles..? In case of ADVENTURE!


WWW
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2011, 06:58:32 pm »

More to do with repair than with making, but this site is really rather good.

http://www.m-p.co.uk/muk/ryoc/

I don't know if this is the same Watchguy who frequents Brass Goggles, but this site is well worth a visit.

http://thewatchguy.homestead.com/index.html

« Last Edit: January 28, 2011, 07:58:41 pm by Captain Shipton Bellinger » Logged
Abslomrob
Deck Hand
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« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2011, 03:11:59 pm »

This is more for wrist watches, but the basics are mostly the same:

http://www.TimeZoneWatchSchool.com
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Captain MacMorrigan
Officer
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United States United States



« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2011, 06:00:04 pm »

These are great!  Thanks so much!
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