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Author Topic: some help with a mantle clock  (Read 1467 times)
steampunk85
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« on: December 07, 2010, 03:08:12 am »

I just purchased this recently from an antique mall for $35. They thought it wasn't working but all it needed was a pendulum

which i found in another part of the mall for $10 and it works perfectly now.

All i know is that it is a sessions clock from the label on the front but beyond that i know nothing about it.

there is no label on the door or any where on the clock and nothing on the movement either.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

any help would be greatly appreciated in figuring out exactly what clock it is. also any suggestions on what to do with it would also be greatly appreciated because frankly I have no idea what i should do with it.
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watch_guy
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2010, 04:27:08 am »

I don't know a whole lot about clocks, but I'll try and help you out as best as I can.

You have what's known as a Tambour style clock. These were popular in and around the 1920s. They were made by most of the American manufacturers. I have a Waterbury Tambour myself.

Your clock has two things going for it. The first is that the case is a little bit fancier than the standard Tambour style. This adds to desirability.

More importantly, however, the three keyholes point toward it being a chime movement. Most commonly, these just have a standard strike movement, which will strikes the hour and half hour. A chime movement plays a chime sequence on the quarter, half, and three quarter hour. On the full hour, they chime and strike the hour. Most chime clocks pay the Westminster chime sequence.

A chime Tambour is a good bit more desirable than a strike Tambour.

As far as what to do with it-my suggestion is the same as I suggest for any watch or clock-leave it as-is, aside from possibly having a professional clockmaker clean and oil it.
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steampunk85
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2010, 03:19:31 am »

well thank you my good sir for the excellent information! I have decided to keep it for my new house I am getting. My office will be throughly steampunked out.

My grandfather agreed to give me his old Franklin Stove as a gift for my office for getting my first house. Smiley
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Darkhound
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2010, 06:12:57 am »

The Sessions Clock Co. began when William E. Sessions bought out the E. N. Welch Co. in Forrestville, Connecticut about 1900. It became the Sessions Clock Co. in 1903, and made complete mechanical clocks in a variety of styles under that name until 1956. They were rather good clocks in handsome cases, and I'm glad this one has found a good home.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2010, 09:52:05 pm by Darkhound » Logged

"Stupidity is a curse with which even the Gods struggle in vain. Ignorance we can fix."
escherblacksmith
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2010, 06:53:59 pm »

neat, I think my folks have a near duplicate . . . as to what to do with it . . . ? Use it as it was intended?
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