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Author Topic: I need a steamy/Victorian christmas feast recipe!  (Read 1112 times)
elShoggotho
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« on: December 06, 2010, 02:12:48 am »

So here's the deal: I volunteered for the preparation of my family's christmas feast. My original idea fell flat, but I'm still obligated by honour to make a good feast. The only limitation: it has to be beef based.

So, how do I feed my family (parents, grandma, uncle & fiancée, little brother) in style?
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« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2010, 02:49:51 am »

In my opinion rib is the best joint of beef and, cooked on the bone certainly looks very appropriate for a festive feast.

I'd serve it with carrots, roasted parsnips, roast potatoes, peas and a black pepper sauce made with the roasting juices.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2010, 02:52:06 am by Narsil » Logged







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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2010, 03:10:30 am »

Two questions:

1.  How many people will be attending?
2.  How much money are you willing to spend? (this will differ from region to region, of course, but read the following...)

The reason I ask, is that I have a rib roast recipe from Ming Tsai of the Food Network (US), which is very good BUT VERY EXPENSIVE.  This meat dish I precede with my own recipes for antipasto; One recipe, a fancy salad of sliced hearts of palm and green asparagus with mayonnaise and a half hard-boiled egg sprinkled with paprika.  And if people are very hungry (or very big  Grin ), my own other recipe is a spinach fettuccine pasta "a la Normandy" with white Riesling wine-cheese sauce (I guess somewhat similar to Alfredo sauce but with wine), shrimp, crayfish and mussels.  But that is almost overkill.  Grin

For 10 people:  10 lbs of prime rib roast (with bone) heavily crusted with what seems to be an awful lot of salt and pepper (2 cups of Fleur de sel or Kosher salt 6 tablespoons of mixed, red, black and white pepper), but it all works out in the end.  Cure in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours, better overnight.  Preheat oven and then Roast/Bake (at that temperature an electric oven on "bake" has to do both simultaneously, actually) uncovered at 287 C (550 F) for 30 minutes until brown, then bake at 162 C (325 F) for 2-3 hours covered with aluminum foil depending on weight, shooting for at least 54 C (130 F) internal temperature for medium rare.  The meat alone is plain brilliant.  I don't know what else to call it.  Leave the salt crust on until you cut the meat (of course you need to let the meat rest before cutting!!)

The original gravy is made from the drippings of the roasting/baking itself, but I find it too unpractical, so I fry some 8 strips of bacon instead, and while the meat is roasting, then I brown 8 (yes 8!!) shallots, shitaake musgrooms (2 cups) and remove the bacon (which you can eat as a snack),  and deglaze (scrape the drippings from the pan) with red wine (4 cups), and reduce (boil off) to 25% of the original volume.  Then you add  8 cups of beef stock, and two fennel stalks (using the whole bulb plus stalk it looks like Celery a bit just trim off the "leaves", OR in place of all that 3 bulbs of star anise, which is harder to get), plus  2 tablespoons thyme, 2 tablespoons of butter and two more of soy sauce. and reduce again to 50% volume.

The original recipe (which I did for many years) calls for everything to be blended to a puree at the end and passed through a sieve to leave a perfectly smooth gravy, but I've been thinking that's wrong (and dangerous since I burned myself once while blending, that stuff expands and "froths" with movement), and perhaps it'd be better to leave some of the chunks of mushrooms, shallot and anise whole for texture. I'll try that the next time; I'm willing to bet the sauce will be more interesting that way.

After serving the full course, people WILL ask you when you plan to open the restaurant  Grin  that became one of my signature Christmas dinners. (but I have two others on reserve  Grin)


Cheers,

JW
« Last Edit: December 06, 2010, 06:03:00 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Camillia du Chine
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« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2010, 05:57:44 am »

Disclaimer : I am vegan, so can only get so far behind this...  Grin   

As stated before... depending upon number of guests, budget, time, and so forth :

Have you thought about Beef Wellington?  It's a loin sort of cut, covered in a pate of mushrooms, ham, spices, etc., and wrapped in puff pastry to bake.  You can buy very serviceable puff pastry ready made.  It's more low and long in appearance, not tall like a standing rib crown, but still very dressy.  Can use cut out bits of pastry to decorate the outside and/or put decorative cuts in the pastry.  You can do one large roast, or wrap individual portions for petit Wellingtons.  Google has a number of recipes and lots of images.
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elShoggotho
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« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2010, 06:00:57 am »

Six people will be attending, including myself. Knowing my folks, we'll need at least a pound of beef per person.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2010, 07:36:14 am »

Then it's not so bad , you can work it out... Costwise as well.  My problems were when I was bringing 10 to 12 people into a two bedroom apartment!
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RoseOak
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« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2010, 10:38:07 pm »

Heston Blumenthal's victorian feast

I saw the gothic and the fairy tale ones and they were great fun. It might not contain anything cookable but its probably fun to watch

http://www.channel4.com/programmes/hestons-feasts
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elShoggotho
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« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2010, 12:42:17 am »

Then it's not so bad , you can work it out... Costwise as well.  My problems were when I was bringing 10 to 12 people into a two bedroom apartment!
I wonder if that recipe would work with steak quality beef. I can get kosher (or rather halal, certified) steak for EUR 3 to 4 a pound.
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« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2010, 02:56:34 am »

Sir,

If cost is an issue, beef brisket tends to be on the inexpensive side.

Rub with an equal mix of ground cumin, kosher salt and black pepper, wrap and refrigerate at least a couple days.
Slow roast on a rack at 250F (pardon US measures) over onions, carots and celery and liquid of your choice to internal temp. of 185F. Depending on size, this may well take all day.

Blend 1/2 the veggies into a pure to thicken your gravy , slice meat very thin, cross-grain, and enjoy Smiley
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« Reply #9 on: December 08, 2010, 11:22:06 am »

I have a couple of spiced beef recipes which I can recommend. I've put them in degrees of difficulty. The last one takes over a week to prepare and serve and its supposed to be for Twelfth night but its worth it.


Quote
Bartlemas Beef

3lb brisket of beef
1/4 tsp each of ground nutmeg,ginger,cinnamon,cloves and mace
1tsp salt
rub the beef with the spices and salt, put into close fitting earthenware dish and cover with water. Braise for 30 mins per  pound (450g) until tender. Serve very hot with parsnips, potatoes and  spiced mustard




Quote
Martinmas Beef
3lb brisket of beef
1 inch piece of root ginger
2-3 blades of made
1/4 a grated nutmeg
1/4 tsp ground cloves
1tsp salt
1/2 pint dry white wine
2tbs white wine vinegar
1oz cornflour

Put the beef in an earthenware dish, finelt chop the ginger root and mix with mace, nutmeg cloves v and salt. Stire spices into the wine with the vinegar and pour over the beef. Cover with a tight fitting lid and  oven coook for 3-4 hours. Remove the meet, cover with foil and leave to stand. Thicken the sauce with  little cornflour in cold water and serve with the beef




Quote
Hunting Beef
3lb silverside of beef
2oz cane sugar
1/2 oz black peppercorns
1/4 oz allspice
1/2 oz juniper berries
1 1/2oz salt
rub beef with sugar abndleave for  2 days ion a stoneware pot in the fridge
crush allspices with the salt, rub the beef with this mixture everyday for 7 days, After 7 days remove from dish and wash well. Put meat in an ovenproof dish with 1/2 pt of water and bak in a slow over for 5 hours. Remove, drain and cover with board and weights. Leave for 24 hours before carving
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Mr Peter Harrow, Esq
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« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2010, 08:56:15 pm »

Roast Suckling Tiny Tim? First catch your Dickensian character (Tiny Tim should be easy)
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« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2010, 01:20:58 am »

www.historicalfoods.com has LOTS of good recipies
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elShoggotho
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« Reply #12 on: December 21, 2010, 03:54:17 pm »

I decided for an adaptation of Mr. Wilhelm's recipe, to go with the cheesecake my brother will supply. As always, the feast will be glorious.

Next year, I'll go back to traditional stuff though, serving goose with chestnuts.
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Just call me Rob
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« Reply #13 on: December 21, 2010, 04:08:12 pm »


It certainly does look to be a good recipe, I may have to scale it down and try it myself.

Personally, I'm quite taken by Beef Wellington.

I made one the other month.
Filet steak (or sirloin can be used).
Puff pastry (from the frozen food section)
A big slab of decent pate.
Muchrooms
Onions
Brandy.

Chop and fry the onions and mushrooms, chuck in a glug of brandy.
While they are frying roll out the pastry – it needs to be big enough to wrap the meat with about an inch all the way round spare.

Take the mushrooms and onions and put them in a bowl add the pate, mix it all up so it's all gooey and meaty.
Take some of it and put it in the middle of the pastry in a shape about the size of the steak.
Put the steak on top.
Brush the steak with more brandy.
Put the pate mix all round and on top of the steak.
Wrap the whole meaty mess in the rest of the pasty.
Brush with egg.
Cook.
I can't actually remember how long to cook for – it'll depend on the size of the lump of meat anyway. I think you cook it for the same time as you'd cook a beef roast of the same weight.

It's actually very easy to make and it tasted fantastic, it's one of the most savoury dishes ever.
You can make them big enough for 10 or use a steak and make an individual one.

I've had success in using very thick cut steak and make a 2 person Wellington.
Which makes me think, I really must do another one.

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« Reply #14 on: December 22, 2017, 11:58:14 pm »

Does any one have culinary plans for this season?

My Bah! Humbug! roommates will not be doing anything for this Xmas, and I doubt I'll be able to crash a party. Given that I cooked for Xmas last year, I'm unwilling to go without some more of that Prime Beef I posted in this thread... (see recipe above)

Because this will be a personal portion, I have found a small 2 lbs. piece in the supermarket, which I plan to bake encrusted in salt and pepper as I have done in the past. Fopr the side dish I have purchased basil-infused potato gnocchi which well be served with traditional tomato sauce. The basil should go well with the meat.

For dessert, I will be buying the traditional, Cajeta, a goat milk caramel sauce, which will be poured over crepes and garnished with crushed walnuts.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2017, 12:49:43 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
walking stick
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« Reply #15 on: December 23, 2017, 12:19:39 am »

Look up Beef Wellington, basically beef baked in pastry with wine mushrooms and/or pâté.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #16 on: December 23, 2017, 12:58:28 am »

Look up Beef Wellington, basically beef baked in pastry with wine mushrooms and/or pâté.

The thing is, with Beef Wellington, I have a irrational fear that Chef Gordon Ramsey is going to show up and give me a verbal assault worse than Sgt. Gunny would scream when he's in a bad mood...  Grin
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #17 on: December 23, 2017, 07:08:46 am »


 Here is a New Zealand  classic

  Standard roast beef  with a few spices rubbed in, ginger is good, garlic etc.   Roast potatoes, carrots, pumpkin, kumara. Maybe onion and mushroom added.  Serve with peas,  beans and gravy. Other seasonal vegetables  can be cooked  accordingly.    Christmas is in summer in the Antipodes. We have lighter food.  Roast  meat is often served cold   for  Christmas  dinner.

http://www.beefandlamb.com.au/How_to/Cooking_beef_and_lamb/Tools_and_Apps/Cooking_times_and_conversion_table

 Followed by trifle, pavlova, cheesecake,  brandy snaps
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #18 on: December 23, 2017, 06:23:12 pm »


 Here is a New Zealand  classic

  Standard roast beef  with a few spices rubbed in, ginger is good, garlic etc.   Roast potatoes, carrots, pumpkin, kumara. Maybe onion and mushroom added.  Serve with peas,  beans and gravy. Other seasonal vegetables  can be cooked  accordingly.    Christmas is in summer in the Antipodes. We have lighter food.  Roast  meat is often served cold   for  Christmas  dinner.

http://www.beefandlamb.com.au/How_to/Cooking_beef_and_lamb/Tools_and_Apps/Cooking_times_and_conversion_table

 Followed by trifle, pavlova, cheesecake,  brandy snaps


You see, that's the thing. Antipoedian Christmas should be in June 25! It's not like Christmas falls on the day of the real Nativity, because nobody knows what that date is. The Northern European tradition of Xmas follows Solstice Pagan festivals! All we know is that it's the first quarter of the year. With that much fudging, it makes no difference if Christmas is in December or June!!

Just noticing the terminology. Kumara is a cultivar of Red/Purple Sweet Potato:

Wiki (Sweet Potato)
Quote
In New Zealand, the most common cultivar is the red (purple) cultivar called kumara, a name derived from the Māori name kūmara, but orange ('Beauregard') and gold cultivars are also available.[7] Kumara is particularly popular as a roasted food, or in contemporary cuisine as kumara chips, often served with sour cream and sweet chili sauce. Occasionally, shops in Australia will label purple cultivars as "purple sweet potato" to denote the difference to the other cultivars. About 95% of Australia's production is of the orange cultivar named 'Beauregard', originally from North America, known simply as "sweet potato". A reddish-purple cultivar, 'Northern Star', is 4% of production and is sold as "kumara".
« Last Edit: December 23, 2017, 06:33:32 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #19 on: December 23, 2017, 06:43:10 pm »

Well I got the Beef. Now I face the dilemma of not having a working (electric) oven. Lower electric element busted.  Angry

Technically according to the package recommendations I only need 300 F / 149 C. And the piece of meat is relatively thin. Maybe about 3 inches thick.

I just realised my toaster oven goes up to 450 F / 232 C, and can easily fit the piece of meat plus aluminium container up to 4 inches high quite easily on the lower tray. Toaster oven Christmas??  Roll Eyes Maybe use a crumpled "pound-cake" aluminium container sitting on top of the solid lower tray, and an aluminium foil cover with open slots at the top to protect the Quartz IR lamp??  Grin

I also have a gas grill capable of much higher temperatures. I think that will be more reasonable...

At 300F it will only take about 50 minutes for medium rare for the 1.8 lbs of meat. Just planning to crust in gros cel salt and red/white/black crushed pepper corn mix.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2017, 06:51:03 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
madamemarigold
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« Reply #20 on: December 24, 2017, 04:35:46 pm »

We wont have as many here for Christmas Dinner so there is not much sense to cook a great amount so I'm thinking we are going to go totally out there and have "Lasagna!" for dinner. With pecan pie... Far from a proper holiday dinner but still sounds good!
(Heresy I say, heresy!)  Cheesy Roll Eyes Grin My mother would be totally aghast if she was still here.   Kiss
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RJBowman
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« Reply #21 on: December 24, 2017, 05:12:24 pm »

I also have a gas grill capable of much higher temperatures. I think that will be more reasonable...

I've grilled steaks outside for Christmas when the oven wasn't working. I highly recommend it.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #22 on: December 24, 2017, 05:36:45 pm »



After a series of low key Christmas, oven issues,  family contingencies etc, I'm doing a roast pork.  I put juniper berries in  the stab holes, rubbed in ginger and Chinese  5 spice, and sprinkled with garlic salt. It's resting in the fridge.  I will roast  potatoes, carrots  and  pumpkin with it.  [I forgot to get peas  beans or silver beet]

 There is a pavlova  to dress up  with whipped cream, tinned peaches and raspberries.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #23 on: December 24, 2017, 07:29:51 pm »

I also have a gas grill capable of much higher temperatures. I think that will be more reasonable...

I've grilled steaks outside for Christmas when the oven wasn't working. I highly recommend it.

It has to be that way. The pound cake size tin container takes 90 percent of the volume of the toaster oven. It'll end up damaging the oven as most of the IR radiation will be reflected,and this Rib roast is so marbled that it has to be inside a container.

I ended up buying a large size roast tin and will be covering with aluminum foil inside the grill. Built in Thermometer on the grill means I can monitor the temperature. What I may do is place the foil container/pan over a thin steel plate we have on the grill, to diffuse the heat under the pan.

We wont have as many here for Christmas Dinner so there is not much sense to cook a great amount so I'm thinking we are going to go totally out there and have "Lasagna!" for dinner. With pecan pie... Far from a proper holiday dinner but still sounds good!
(Heresy I say, heresy!)  Cheesy Roll Eyes Grin My mother would be totally aghast if she was still here.   Kiss

I've cooked pasta for the second course before, but I tended to cook in the French style with mussels, other shell fish, cream and cheese with white wine. A Mediterranean dish with tomato calls for red wine, and can be cooked into the sauce, especially if it's a meat sauce. Alcohol makes everything taste better and turns every dish into a party dish  Grin
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #24 on: December 24, 2017, 07:44:26 pm »


 Here is a New Zealand  classic

  Standard roast beef  with a few spices rubbed in, ginger is good, garlic etc.   Roast potatoes, carrots, pumpkin, kumara. Maybe onion and mushroom added.  Serve with peas,  beans and gravy. Other seasonal vegetables  can be cooked  accordingly.    Christmas is in summer in the Antipodes. We have lighter food.  Roast  meat is often served cold   for  Christmas  dinner.

http://www.beefandlamb.com.au/How_to/Cooking_beef_and_lamb/Tools_and_Apps/Cooking_times_and_conversion_table

 Followed by trifle, pavlova, cheesecake,  brandy snaps


You see, that's the thing. Antipoedian Christmas should be in June 25! It's not like Christmas falls on the day of the real Nativity, because nobody knows what that date is. The Northern European tradition of Xmas follows Solstice Pagan festivals! All we know is that it's the first quarter of the year. With that much fudging, it makes no difference if Christmas is in December or June!!

Just noticing the terminology. Kumara is a cultivar of Red/Purple Sweet Potato:

Wiki (Sweet Potato)
Quote
In New Zealand, the most common cultivar is the red (purple) cultivar called kumara, a name derived from the Māori name kūmara, but orange ('Beauregard') and gold cultivars are also available.[7] Kumara is particularly popular as a roasted food, or in contemporary cuisine as kumara chips, often served with sour cream and sweet chili sauce. Occasionally, shops in Australia will label purple cultivars as "purple sweet potato" to denote the difference to the other cultivars. About 95% of Australia's production is of the orange cultivar named 'Beauregard', originally from North America, known simply as "sweet potato". A reddish-purple cultivar, 'Northern Star', is 4% of production and is sold as "kumara".



  The purple kumara  grown in NZ today   could be an introduced   cultivar  from South  America during g colonial times. The original  kumara was a small dark fleshed vegetable.! That too may have been introduced  to the Pacific    from South America  over the millenia

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