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Author Topic: Wired Edge Brass Sheetmetalwork.  (Read 4461 times)
Dr cornelius quack
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Arrant Carney. Phmebian Cultural Attache.


« on: November 14, 2010, 02:26:14 am »

Haven't made a wired edge in thin sheet since I as at college, but the current project seemed as though it might benefit so I had a go.

The sheet is 36 gauge 'tooling brass' from a local craft shop with copper wire from a bit of 2.5mm twin and earth.



Cut sheet to size and form a fold with a straight edge and a scriber/screwdriver.
Place the straightened wire in the corner and press down the lip of plate with a round ended bar. (I used the back end of a craft knife handle.


Solder along the seam, using the minimum amount of solder you can manage. Too much will cause the edge to stiffen up so you will struggle to roll the sheet for the next step.


Roll the sheet to the finished size and solder the edge seam.
Apply to your Raygun.
Stand back and admire.


« Last Edit: November 14, 2010, 02:40:13 am by Dr cornelius quack » Logged

Such are the feeble bases on which many a public character rests.

Today, I am two, separate Gorillas.
Mr. Boltneck
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« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2010, 04:32:59 am »

Nifty! I've also seen some references to sheet-metal tools which allow the creation of rolled-over edges around a wire, rather than using solder, but have never tried such a method myself.
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Prof_Von_Grumbleflick
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London & Western Home Counties Steampunk Society


« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2010, 05:53:37 am »

A great job!

With a bit of effort, you could try rolling the metal around a rolling pin if you don't want the beaten look to it as well... but I think it looks fine with the hammered finish.. Makes it look a bit more "functional" as opposed to decorative.

A nice walkthrough on doing rolled edges without any pricey equipment.
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Quote
No matter how far you push the envelope, it remains stationery
Dr cornelius quack
Rogue Ætherlord
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


Arrant Carney. Phmebian Cultural Attache.


« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2010, 09:04:42 am »

Thanks chaps.

I'm trying a few different surface finishes just as an exercise in variety.

36 gauge Brass

20 gauge Copper
The 36 gauge plate tends to crinkle quite easily so at the moment its getting a fairly rough and ready hammered or burnished treatment.
Hopefully, I want to get hold of a suitable sized stake to allow for a proper planished surface. It's a painstaking process, but......

I'm a sucker for Planishment!!!

TA! DAH!!

ITHANGYOW!!
« Last Edit: November 15, 2010, 09:15:05 am by Dr cornelius quack » Logged
Mr. Boltneck
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« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2010, 06:18:45 pm »

That's a terrible pun.
I have seen people work thin brass over substrates like Neoprene, or over carefully-cut cardboard patterns, using burnishing tools rather than hammering. I wonder if wrapping such a substrate around a suitably-sized mandrel would let you do the final work in the round.
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Dr cornelius quack
Rogue Ætherlord
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Arrant Carney. Phmebian Cultural Attache.


« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2010, 09:02:44 pm »

The finished diameter is governed by the steel compressed air bottles that form the core of the build. These are a throw away from work and I can get a regular supply, so I'm tied to that size.
Your idea for a soft backing over a solid core to give a workable surface puts me in mind of the technique of backing sheet metal onto a block of Pitch for Repoussé and chasing. I always fancied giving that a go.
I'm also thinking of the possibility of using an engraver as the power source for a small version of one of these;
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sidecar_jon
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« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2010, 09:33:15 pm »

Your idea for a soft backing over a solid core to give a workable surface puts me in mind of the technique of backing sheet metal onto a block of Pitch for Repoussé and chasing. I always fancied giving that a go.

Well nowdays.... ok so some still use pitch (though not the sort you get at B&Q for roofs) I use plasticine on big areas especially on Pewter as its soft and need plenty of support. Warm it and mould it to the surface and hammer away. Other times i use wet sand, packed tight it does an ok job as long as you don't mind hammering the thing back into shape, again plunged into wet sand. For more intricate and small work you cant beat lead. (as the Newlyn copper workers used) Roofing lead sheets make working flat sheets crisply, easy...
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jringling
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« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2010, 12:05:46 am »

May I ask what is in the picture right above the flathead screwdriver?
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Dr cornelius quack
Rogue Ætherlord
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Arrant Carney. Phmebian Cultural Attache.


« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2010, 12:45:01 am »

These?


They are just a little something I put together in an idle moment to see if I could.
Made from lengths of earth bonding strip wrapped round a dowel and soldered up to form a tube wiv 'oles in it.
I think they will end up with some acrylic rod down the middle and LEDs hidden in the tube sections for something or other.
« Last Edit: November 16, 2010, 12:53:43 am by Dr cornelius quack » Logged
jringling
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convicted Rogue and Vagabond…long story…


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« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2010, 12:57:24 am »

That's it...

Not sure what they are, but they look cool...
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Dr cornelius quack
Rogue Ætherlord
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Arrant Carney. Phmebian Cultural Attache.


« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2010, 01:05:06 am »

Thank you.

They look like they might have a sort of 'mysterious, glowing power conduit' vibe going on.

Which is always a good thing.
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Prof_Von_Grumbleflick
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London & Western Home Counties Steampunk Society


« Reply #11 on: November 16, 2010, 02:27:52 am »

Yeah, they'd be great around a fluorescent tube for something like wall lights! Maybe if the tube is wrapped in a nice green gel first.
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Dr cornelius quack
Rogue Ætherlord
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Arrant Carney. Phmebian Cultural Attache.


« Reply #12 on: November 16, 2010, 02:35:20 am »

Bit small for a florri tube. i.d. is only about 10mm.
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Prof_Von_Grumbleflick
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London & Western Home Counties Steampunk Society


« Reply #13 on: November 16, 2010, 01:56:11 pm »

I got the impression that they were a little bigger compared to the handle of the screwdriver. A pity because they're pretty cool looking! You can get much smaller diameter tubes (Fillament type) although they might still be a little too fat.. But they'd have the added bonus of being dimmable.

Maybe something like this (Spoilered because it's a large image):

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Dunno... That's just what I'd do with them. hehe!
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Mr. Boltneck
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« Reply #14 on: November 16, 2010, 07:29:36 pm »

If those tubes were a bit bigger, you could light them with LEDs and make strange, confusing, nunchaku. People wouldn't know what hit 'em!
Less frivolously, if you added an umbrella to the top, and EL-wire to the interior, you could make an SP version of the illuminated umbrellas from Blade Runner.
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Dr cornelius quack
Rogue Ætherlord
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


Arrant Carney. Phmebian Cultural Attache.


« Reply #15 on: November 16, 2010, 09:11:18 pm »

Well, there's no reason why the tube could not be any diameter you like. It's just a matter of winding it round a former of the required size.
The ones I made are the size they are so as to be usable in the raygun builds that I'm on at the moment.
Another possibility would be to form the tube, case it in heatshrink sleeving and pour a clear casting resin into the middle. This would give you a solid rod of plastic which sat flush with the surface of the copper matrix.
I can see that approach working well in terms of end lighting the thing with LEDs.
Come to think of it, you could run fibre optic filament to the windows, and pot them up in resin to allow for different colours.
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twilightbanana
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Netherlands Netherlands


« Reply #16 on: November 21, 2010, 08:50:59 am »

I might know a good source for a larger size of pierced strip:

http://www.theringlord.com/

Besides rings and maille, they also make scales and tags for use in armour and jewelry by punching the shapes from metal strip. They have, in the past, also sold the scrap strip with the holes punched out of them.

I checked their site, but right now I can only find the scrap strip by performing a search for it (it looks like they removed it from all the categories):
http://theringlord.com/cart/shopdisplayproducts.asp?Search=Yes&sppp=1000&websess=85919564496286

Mostly aluminium, some steel. They also make bronze scales, but with todays' prices for copper alloys there probably isn't a very large market for them so they don't produce a lot of bronze scrap strip. Could be worth the trouble of asking, though.

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