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Author Topic: Inaugural Goggles  (Read 1655 times)
Lady Kensington Gore
Gunner
**
United States United States


Pioneer of Carbon Crispies


« on: October 16, 2010, 07:02:44 am »

I am embarking on my first steampunk project, the ubiquitous goggles. I have some questions about design and whatnot.

These are my components.

Issue the first: The eyepieces are very obviously pipe fittings. Worse, they're chrome. I may attempt to electroplate them with brass, but have little experience with electroplating. What would look better: Clean chrome eyepieces, or possibly botched brass ones? Will brass even take on chrome?
Also, I'm contemplating grinding down the corners of the 'nut' sections. Is the re-purposed plumbing look in? Or should I get out my Dremel and have at it?

Issue the second: This is the pattern I wish to cut into the leather of the eyepiece. Is it in good Victorian tradition?
I plan to cut shallow bevels into the leather with an X-Acto knife and line them with gold paint. Is there a tool that could do this better?

Thank you for your time and suggestions,
Lady Kensington Gore

P.S.: Please ignore my frequent modifications. I keep being informed of materials a collaborator can procure after I hit the post button.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2010, 07:09:16 am by Lady Kensington Gore » Logged
Botanatrix
Gunner
**
Australia Australia


« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2010, 07:12:26 am »

I think I would keep the chrome over possibly sketchy looking faux-brass...but would investigate silver jewelry-type details to add to make it look like a conscious choice as opposed to sad necessity.

Perhaps some sort of stud or chain on the band? A chain of silver-and-brass links could be attractive and tie the look together? Or is this too girly/ornamented for what you were thinking of?

Maybe just a loupe of silver metal?

Sorry, I'm new too. I'm just floating ideas out, out loud, because I am in the throes of designing a pair of glasses for myself.
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Captain Shipton Bellinger
Master Tinkerer
***
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Why the goggles..? In case of ADVENTURE!


WWW
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2010, 07:32:16 am »

Issue the first: The eyepieces are very obviously pipe fittings. Worse, they're chrome.


It may be worth checking that they are actually brass that has been chrome-plated, as many plumbing fittings are. I'd suggest trying the magnet test, and if the magnet doesn't stick use a file on a small area that won't be visible in the finished goggles. If it's brass under the chrome, then just continue with the file and abrasive paper until all of the plating is removed.

Quote
This is the pattern I wish to cut into the leather of the eyepiece. Is it in good Victorian tradition?


Those curlicues certainly look Victorian enough to me.

Quote
I plan to cut shallow bevels into the leather with an X-Acto knife and line them with gold paint. Is there a tool that could do this better?


Well, depending on your steadiness of hand and expertise with a knife, an adjustable V-gouge may give a more consistent cut, but an X-acto should work fine.

You could also try a swivel knife with a filigree blade.

« Last Edit: October 16, 2010, 07:37:17 am by Captain Shipton Bellinger » Logged

Capt. Shipton Bellinger R.A.M.E. (rtd)

Arvis
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


Never underestimate the power of a hairless monkey


« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2010, 07:40:04 am »

 First, welcome to BrassGoggles!
Now about your goggles. I say go ahead and make em with what you have. Chances are (if your like me) you'll make some mistakes along the way and want to do them over again anyway. Best to do it with parts you don't care much for anyway. As far as the designs you want to cut into the leather, I think it's lovely! I'd go with it. As far as filling it in with paint, I don't know. But there are quite a few others here who do and soon they should be chiming in some very helpful hints.
 On stripping off chrome, I have tried this and it's a flip'n nightmare! This is why I suggest just making them with what you have with out any grinding of corners or the like. In the mean time, keep your eyes open for the parts you really want.
 I had the same problem you are dealing with as far as going with the "repurposed plumbing parts" went. In the end I went about it the "hard way" which wasn't as difficult as I thought it would be. Yep, I made a butt-load of goof's but they are a work in progress and I'm getting there.

 Arvis
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DAG-NABBIT...I cut it and cut it and cut it... an it's STILL TOO SHORT!
Spiritus
Guest
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2010, 07:00:16 am »

I may attempt to electroplate them with brass, but have little experience with electroplating.
I doubt you can electroplate it with alloy. Mabye with just copper
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Lady Kensington Gore
Gunner
**
United States United States


Pioneer of Carbon Crispies


« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2010, 01:35:51 am »

Thanks, everyone, for your replies!

In the spirit of exploration, I ground away at one (they are ten cents at surplus price, and felt it could be sacrificed) and discovered that the eyepieces are copper underneath, and that grinding them will indeed take for-flipping-ever and look rather sloppy. But it might be a good sign that copper and chrome can get along in an electroplating tank, as has been suggested. I certainly wouldn't mind copper goggles, even if they have that ghastly plumbing-parts look.

I'll be embarking on an electroplating experiment with the copper tonight, and should have results by tomorrow morning.

Fingers crossed,
Lady Kensington Gore
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sidecar_jon
Snr. Officer
****


« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2010, 10:48:56 am »

chrome can be striped of by electrical means....
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Lady Kensington Gore
Gunner
**
United States United States


Pioneer of Carbon Crispies


« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2010, 05:10:26 pm »

chrome can be striped of by electrical means....

I'm all ears. I've only heard of doing it with a sandblaster (which I do not have access to) or muriatic acid (which sounds like a terrible idea for someone who nearly failed high school chemistry) or taking it to a professional (which sounds like an expensive overkill.)

As for the electroplating...Well, I did not fail to electroplate. I merely discovered it is impossible with the given materials. Some chromed areas have a coppery blush, but most of it just looks corroded and discolored. Ah, well, back to the surplus store. Perhaps they have some brass stock in today.

FOR SCIENCE!
Lady Kensington Gore
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Captain Shipton Bellinger
Master Tinkerer
***
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Why the goggles..? In case of ADVENTURE!


WWW
« Reply #8 on: October 20, 2010, 05:37:03 pm »

chrome can be striped of by electrical means....

I'm all ears. I've only heard of doing it with a sandblaster (which I do not have access to) or muriatic acid (which sounds like a terrible idea for someone who nearly failed high school chemistry) or taking it to a professional (which sounds like an expensive overkill.

Use a sodium hydroxide (caustic soda) solution as the electrolyte and a stainless steel cathode. Connect the piece that is to be stripped as the anode. It may take a little while, depending upon current, solution strength and such, but it will work.

I can't recommend this method for removing chrome plating from aluminium.  Wink

Quote
As for the electroplating...Well, I did not fail to electroplate. I merely discovered it is impossible with the given materials. Some chromed areas have a coppery blush, but most of it just looks corroded and discolored.

This has also been my experience. Plating on top of plating seldom gives a satisfactory result.

Quote
Ah, well, back to the surplus store. Perhaps they have some brass stock in today.

What??!! Never give in! Never surrender!  Cheesy

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JingleJoe
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
United Kingdom United Kingdom


The Green Dungeon Alchemist


WWW
« Reply #9 on: October 22, 2010, 09:22:27 am »

You could allways etch the chrome off if it's nice metal underneath, it's the opposite of electroplating. Simply make a salt water solution, peice to etch goes to positive and some useless scrap metal peice to negative with a bulb or resistor or something in the circuit to stop the power supply from overloading, I'd say a 10ohm resistor although in the past I've used high power 3.3ohm resistors, they get toasty.
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Green Dungeon Alchemist Laboratories
Providing weird sound contraptions and time machines since 2064.
quatch
Deck Hand
*
Canada Canada


« Reply #10 on: October 29, 2010, 02:15:20 am »

Did you clean thoroughly? With the degreaser/alcohol/etc. I hear that can make a huge difference in the electroplating.
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