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Author Topic: removing screen printed lable.  (Read 5182 times)
draxthedestroyer
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« on: October 06, 2010, 07:54:07 pm »

I found a case of glass bottles that I want to use but the lables are screen printed on. With it being glass I am not too sure about sanding or grinding it off. So if someone has advice do help.
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Narsil
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« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2010, 08:03:17 pm »


white spirit should shift most inks, failing that try acetone.
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A man of eighty has outlived probably three new schools of painting, two of architecture and poetry and a hundred in dress.
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draxthedestroyer
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« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2010, 09:23:13 pm »

you sir are a good man.
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Mr. Boltneck
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« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2010, 06:17:47 pm »

Since it's glass, and very few things can harm glass, you may also want to try an ordinary commercial paint-stripper. Glass is often printed with an enamel-based ink, so it can take a bit of extra chemistry to shift it once it has cured.
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blacklines
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« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2010, 01:13:13 am »

Since it's glass, and very few things can harm glass, you may also want to try an ordinary commercial paint-stripper. Glass is often printed with an enamel-based ink, so it can take a bit of extra chemistry to shift it once it has cured.
if its true enamel, this means that it is fused on as enamel is a glass frit and a flux along with a binding body that burns off when the enamel is fired onto the glass.  If this is the case it all depends on the kind of bottle.  For example, during my undergraduate career as a glass worked I would pick up rolling rock, corona, and red stripe beer bottles from a kiln that was at 900 degrees or so and open them up in a gloryhole...  The enamel stayed on, even through the ~2100 degree heat.  OTOH, rogue beer bottles appear to have a much lower temperature enamel on them that would dust off at 900 degrees.  I never attempted to remove the enamel labels from pyrex or other lab glass, so YMMV on that, but I suspect its tough as those things are built to withstand both heat and exposure to various solvents.
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Mr. Boltneck
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« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2010, 04:59:55 am »

Yeah, actual fused enamel (not an enamel in the ink/paint sense) is a whole different game. No solvent will remove that, unless you want to count hydrofluoric acid, which I personally place in the category of please-do-that-far-away-from-me-thanks.
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