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Author Topic: Fountain Pens & writing implements...what do you use?  (Read 30183 times)
floateruk
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« Reply #25 on: August 02, 2007, 02:00:39 pm »

http://www.cultpens.com/acatalog/Faber-Castell_Ambition_Cocos.html
http://www.cultpens.com/acatalog/Faber-Castell_Ambition_Black.html

I use the black one at all times. Absolutely beautiful pens.
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Vienna Fahrmann
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« Reply #26 on: August 02, 2007, 08:29:55 pm »


     Dear Floateruk,

     thanks for the link to cultpen...I hadn't yet found that site in my pen hunt.  I'll have to go through it when I have a bit more time.

     Vienna
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heavyporker
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« Reply #27 on: August 02, 2007, 10:33:04 pm »

 Is this the pine-scented green ink you were referring to?

 http://www.nostalgicimpressions.com/product_p/265h.htm



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Robotguy
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« Reply #28 on: August 02, 2007, 10:50:08 pm »

That is not the ink that I purchased. I bought mine from Pendemonium http://pendemonium.com/ink_scented.htm. They have the scent as an additive, and you can choose any ink they carry (lots!) and add a custom scent. I am not sure why they don't carry the "Fragrant Woods" scent anymore, They only have Black Cherry, Delphinium, Strawberry, Violet and Watermint nowadays. Here (http://web.archive.org/web/20040204095611/http://www.pendemonium.com/ink_scented.htm) is a Wayback machine link to the page when they had the "Fragrant Woods".

J. Herbin (http://www.jherbin.com/fountain_pen_inks.shtml) carries some scented inks also...
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floateruk
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« Reply #29 on: August 03, 2007, 01:20:18 pm »

No problem at all Vienna.

I think i got my black one for about £40 in the end. Not sure it definately came from cult pens.
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akanekun
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« Reply #30 on: August 04, 2007, 08:40:19 pm »

AH! Now I realize what I have. I bought a lovely glass dip pen from a novelty rag because the idea captivated me. It's fun to write with, but the glass tip (the writing tip is a double-helix of glass) scratches on paper a bit and it's a bit aggravating trying to keep in mind how much writing I can do with each tip (it's something like four or five words each dip).

 I never realized that there were so many types of ink just for fountain and dip pens. The pine-scented ink sounds LOVELY! Why did they stop selling it, and can it be found anywhere else?

There's always the option of purchasing a perfume oil (blackphoenixalchemylab comes to mind) and adding it to your ink (not sure what the right amount or mixture is, but there's always google) if you want a custom scented ink.

And might I suggest the Namiki Falcon fountain pen? It has one of the most flexible nibs out of the fountain pens I've tried, and is able to yield a line that really varies from thick to thin.
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Great Bizarro
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« Reply #31 on: August 07, 2007, 05:30:29 pm »

In the early 60's in the states they used to make us learn to use a fountain pen to write with. I can still remember the blue and black stains on everything! I eventually started doing calligraphy and got the hang of a quill. Grin
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Improbable
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« Reply #32 on: September 10, 2007, 07:30:29 pm »

If anybody is interested in getting started with fountain pens, I must recommend the Waterman Phileas as one of the best values out there. I think it runs about $30 these days, which gets you a pen, a variety of cartridge colors, and a converter and bottle of ink. The nib is ridiculously better than what you'll find on the disposable pens. It's a plastic body with a very art deco look to it.

Much better to get this and realize how nice fountain pens can be than to drop $5 on some horrible scratchy little thing that scares you off forever.
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markf
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« Reply #33 on: September 10, 2007, 07:46:47 pm »

I like this one a lot.  markf

http://www.eco-artware.com/catalog/MTP1-multi-tool-pen.shtml
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Ettie
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« Reply #34 on: September 10, 2007, 08:18:15 pm »

That is a nice One and looks very oldschool!
I have to get one of those pens! Wink
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Sir Ratchetspanner
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« Reply #35 on: September 10, 2007, 10:02:02 pm »

I use a rotring fountain pen my brother bought me. I cant find a picture of it online, but it has a nice hexagonal metal body. It takes cartridges though, its not the bladder type.

I used to use a cheap parker fountain pen all through middle school. They didnt allow biros. This was scarcely 15 years ago too.

My handwriting is terrible. I dont just mean terrible, i mean "doctor writing a prescription under the influence of the gin" terrible. I find that using a fountain pen forces me to slow down, and makes my writing readable! (at least readable to me)

A strange example of obsolete technology working better than modern disposable stuff.

What annoys me, is i cant find black cartridges on the cheap. My local pound shop sells a packet of 50 blue ones for a pound, but no black! I'm down to my last cartridge.

If i had a go at making a quill pen, it would have to be the medieval style, simply a feather cut to shape. I have a friend who collects feathers.. i wonder if he will part with that foot long perigrine falcon feather of his...
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WookieeGunner
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« Reply #36 on: September 10, 2007, 11:51:46 pm »


As for fountain pens....ick....tried 'em, hate 'em. How anyone managed to draw patents with the damn things is beyond me. I guess I tend to be a bit too heavy handed, and usually end up splitting the nibs. Give me a lead based (oh fine.....graphite based) technical pencil with a good india rubber any old day.

I have a friend who told me about the Sheaffer Snorkel with a Conical tip.  It seems that this particular nib was designed (and demonstrated by Sheaffer) to handle making copies through 10 layers of carbon paper.
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Prof. Brockworth
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« Reply #37 on: September 11, 2007, 07:34:13 am »

Schaeffer fountain-pen here, but as a hot-handed lefty it's a smeary mess unless I am very careful (hot hands make ink expand, which makes traditional pens leak and blob).  For serious work it's Rotring technical pens all the way.  They simply have the cleanest line and blackest ink out there.
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Smaggers
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« Reply #38 on: September 11, 2007, 01:18:59 pm »

Now there's an idea.  I need to get a dead fountain pen that I can fit my Wacom pen into. Grin
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Crane
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« Reply #39 on: September 11, 2007, 10:40:13 pm »

I use one of these:


Even bought a leather slipcase for it to keep it from getting scratched.
Fortunately I don't lose pens.
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Vienna Fahrmann
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« Reply #40 on: September 12, 2007, 02:20:25 am »


     Dear Crane,

     That's a nice-looking pen.  What make & model is it?

     Vienna
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Crane
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« Reply #41 on: September 12, 2007, 09:50:32 am »

It's a Parker Sonnet Special Edition. They also do one with a laquered red barrel, and a gold plated lid that has patterns like the ones on the barrel of this one.
Only cost me £70 on Ebay, including P&P.
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Capt. Algernon Flynn
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« Reply #42 on: September 18, 2007, 12:29:35 am »

For fountain pens, I regret that I haven't anything fancy, just a red Sheaffer-thing that came with a calligraphy set - but it hasn't broken or leaked or exploded on me yet.
I also managed to procure a set of dip-pens from the Victorian Trading Company (who was FINALLY! having a sale! They're usually rather pricey) - clear glass, nicely balanced, and came in a little box/case with six? or five? different colours of ink. I FELL IN INSTANT LOVE.  Cheesy
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Mme. Sculthorpe
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« Reply #43 on: September 19, 2007, 11:47:39 pm »

Ah, I adore this thread! In the past I have used primarily fountain pens, though I do like the way a ball point can capture the delicate flows and loops by a simple easing of the hand. I have tried glass pens and quills, as well as various calligraphy instruments. They all produce their own unique style of writing, though in all honesty my heart belongs to fountain pens.

The most beloved of my collection: the Mont Blanc Jules Verne Limited Edition ~

http://www.montblanc.com/49.php

Sadly a bit too heavy for a small lady's hand; the weight rather causes whispers to become shouts on parchment.  The Oscar Wilde edition, on the other hand, could very well suit. Hmmm...yes.
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Ettie
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« Reply #44 on: September 20, 2007, 02:11:02 am »

Ah, I adore this thread! In the past I have used primarily fountain pens, though I do like the way a ball point can capture the delicate flows and loops by a simple easing of the hand. I have tried glass pens and quills, as well as various calligraphy instruments. They all produce their own unique style of writing, though in all honesty my heart belongs to fountain pens.

The most beloved of my collection: the Mont Blanc Jules Verne Limited Edition ~

http://www.montblanc.com/49.php

Sadly a bit too heavy for a small lady's hand; the weight rather causes whispers to become shouts on parchment.  The Oscar Wilde edition, on the other hand, could very well suit. Hmmm...yes.



Aww that is very nice!

Looks heavy too!
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Chazz the tinkerer
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« Reply #45 on: September 29, 2007, 06:29:32 pm »

Greetings and Salutations,
      I have a small collection of fountain pens ranging from the fairly inexpensive ($30.00) to more expensive ($100+).  I find them to be a joy to write and draw with.  In most of mine of them I use a converter to fill them from a bottle.  I find that the range of colors available in cartridges is some what limited, plus if you fill from a bottle you can mix inks to get a personal color.  Anyway I don't know if anyone has put these out as sources, http://www.coloradopen.com   has an excellent range of pens & http://www.levenger.com  has a nice line of pens and is an excellent source for leather cases, note cards, and assorted other accessories.  Hope this information is helpful. 

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Vienna Fahrmann
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Austria Austria


« Reply #46 on: September 29, 2007, 10:29:33 pm »


     I've been having dreams lately about writing with a glass pen.  Maybe my subconscious is telling me to try it out.

     Vienna

     P.S. I think my "ultimate pen" (if I had unlimited resources) is called the "Darfur", but I don't remember who makes it.  It is very textured silver and gold.
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Nemo137
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« Reply #47 on: September 30, 2007, 04:19:36 am »

When I was ~10 or so, my grandmother bought me a Pelikan learners pen, bright yellow and turqoise, with an adapter for using bottled inks. When I proved that I could use that without making a mess, my dad gave me an old Waterman of his, which I returned when I left for college, not wanting to damage it. Anymore, I use the Pilot V5's, which are very smooth and let me write quickly without sticking like ballpoints do.
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Kew
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« Reply #48 on: September 30, 2007, 10:04:53 pm »

When I was ~10 or so, my grandmother bought me a Pelikan learners pen, bright yellow and turqoise, with an adapter for using bottled inks. When I proved that I could use that without making a mess, my dad gave me an old Waterman of his, which I returned when I left for college, not wanting to damage it. Anymore, I use the Pilot V5's, which are very smooth and let me write quickly without sticking like ballpoints do.

I also use Pilot V5's. I'm eying the Rotring pens somebody pointed out however.

The Pilots must be reasonably good, because a recent comment from a friend on my work was "Your handwriting looks very nice, but I can't read it". I'm not sure if this is a good thing.
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Herr Döktor
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« Reply #49 on: September 30, 2007, 11:57:56 pm »

My weapon of choice:


A Waterman fountain pen, my Christmas present to me some ten years ago, mainly because I can only write with an ink-pen or a pencil, ballpoints make my writing look like it's the random scribblings of a pre-literate child!
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