The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
November 21, 2017, 11:10:15 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 [8] 9   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Fountain Pens & writing implements...what do you use?  (Read 30148 times)
Flynn MacCallister
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Australia Australia


Mad SCIENTIST!


WWW
« Reply #175 on: May 10, 2008, 12:20:17 pm »

It's just you.
Logged
Mr Zero
Officer
***
United Kingdom United Kingdom



WWW
« Reply #176 on: May 10, 2008, 01:42:23 pm »

It's just you.

As usual.
Logged
Em
Snr. Officer
****


WWW
« Reply #177 on: May 10, 2008, 01:53:51 pm »

The order of new nibs and ink came in the other day but I had to continue on a study on Picasso so I never go to play with them. We had a beautiful gold ink and everything.
*sigh*
Logged

"I like old things, they make me feel sad."
     "What's good about sad?"
"It's happy for deep people."
ArdenMaxwell
Officer
***
United States United States

Freelance Tinker on the Lam


WWW
« Reply #178 on: May 11, 2008, 10:13:29 am »

I have several fountain pens.  I made a small case for them from a cigar box with foam and velvet.

[snip] a blue ink which cannot be scanned by a copier.
[/snip]
Wait, they make non-photo INK now? That's absolutely great, I need to lay hands on some.
Logged

F. Arden Maxwell, freelance tinker.
Please refer all correspondence care of Pandora Bay Research Center, South Pacific. Expect delays, and possibly slightly charred responses.
Em
Snr. Officer
****


WWW
« Reply #179 on: May 11, 2008, 10:40:26 am »

I went out for high-tea today and came back with an old ink bottle.
I must examine it more.
Logged
Silas P. Morgan
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States



« Reply #180 on: May 11, 2008, 05:49:43 pm »

Quote
About two weeks ago, I bought another fountain pen at a local antique store for $10... I have to replace the sac ... I tried to make one out of latex, but the glass rod I used as the form was just a little to big, so now I have to send away for one.... (drat, they cost a whole $3.00.... Smiley  ) It's a lever fill Belmont, a cheap pen that was made by the Moore Company, and sold through Rexal stores... But the nib is a fine Flexable... I've played with it by dipping the nib in ink, and can't wait until I get the sac so I can fix it and use it all the time....

An update....
I found another glass rod that was smaller, so the dip latex sac worked this time..... yay! Now I have to fiddle a little more with getting the nib exactly right so it writes more consistantly... But I'm almost done with fixing it.
Logged
ClockworkGodess
Gunner
**
Australia Australia



« Reply #181 on: July 03, 2008, 02:55:55 am »

I have two feather quills that I made myself using methods similar to these:


http://www.flick.com/~liralen/quills/quills.html
So far I've had them about a month, one needs to be re-shaped but the other is fantastic.
Logged

Check out the steampunk brain I found:
http://kevan.org/brain.cgi?kururin.
heavyporker
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #182 on: July 03, 2008, 03:56:56 am »

 Arrrgh!

 Does anyone know the correct way to dilute india ink so I can use it with a dip pen? I got this lovely looking colored india ink supply for Gogglemas, but I haven't had the chance to really work with it much because it just won't dilute to the point where I can write with it! So far, I've gotten to a mix of about one drop of india ink and three gallons of water, and it still won't write! ARRRGH!

 Am I doomed to only use a brush with india ink?
Logged

I hope you all enjoyed Air Kraken Day
Ms. Madeline S. Brightley
Gunner
**
United States United States


Inventor, Artist, and Tea-Addict


WWW
« Reply #183 on: July 03, 2008, 02:42:02 pm »

Arrrgh!

 Does anyone know the correct way to dilute india ink so I can use it with a dip pen? I got this lovely looking colored india ink supply for Gogglemas, but I haven't had the chance to really work with it much because it just won't dilute to the point where I can write with it! So far, I've gotten to a mix of about one drop of india ink and three gallons of water, and it still won't write! ARRRGH!

 Am I doomed to only use a brush with india ink?

Most of the time, I find the easiest way to deal with that is have specific ink for brush and a different ink for pen that is pre-diluted to the appropriate consistency. For instance, Speedball Superblack drawing ink works wonderfully for nib-pens, even finely pointed nibs like the Imperial which makes a super fine line for adding ornamentation and detail to artwork. There are also Windsor Newton colored inks, which work alright, and Walnut ink - which a wonderful brown (not water proof, unfortunately, but lightfast. you can probably find all of these in an art supply store) and works wonderfully for writing. Mind you, I rarely use calligraphy nibs, but they work fine in the drawing ones and in a glass writing pen, so I would definitely recommend them.

-Madeline S. Brightley
Logged

"The truth is rarely pure and never simple. Modern life would be very tedious if it were either, and modern literature a complete impossibility!"
- The Importance of Being Earnest, Oscar Wilde
rogue_designer
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


clockwork gypsy


« Reply #184 on: July 03, 2008, 04:30:15 pm »

Arrrgh!

 Does anyone know the correct way to dilute india ink so I can use it with a dip pen? I got this lovely looking colored india ink supply for Gogglemas, but I haven't had the chance to really work with it much because it just won't dilute to the point where I can write with it! So far, I've gotten to a mix of about one drop of india ink and three gallons of water, and it still won't write! ARRRGH!

 Am I doomed to only use a brush with india ink?

My own experiments with india ink to get the ink thick enough for nice blacks, but not too thick for the dip pen is not worth the trouble. Higgins Black Magic works a treat though. And is pretty indistinguishable when mixing brush and pen work in my experience.
Logged

Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabis, ad caput tuum saxum immane mittam.
(Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes. But deserve a nice glass of absinthe. I have some Montemarte in the cabinet, if you wish.)
Prof Eumides Blakehurst
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia


Scientist by Training, Mad by Practice.


« Reply #185 on: July 04, 2008, 01:39:39 am »

For general spiffiness around the office I have a Monteverde Invicta fountain pen (the one in the spoiler is the rollerball version, but mine is the fountain version) with an iridium tip. Hefty beastie, but writes beautifully. Pelikan tinte black ink in a screw cartridge.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

At home there is the calligraphy set-up, a complete collection of William Mitchells and Speedball Cs, plus a pile of 'post-office' nibs (the basic dip pen nibs used the world over before Bics came along), plus brushes etc.

I friend on a farm nearby keeps geese, so she gives me the main flight pinions when they are shed, so I have quite a few feather quills at the moment, as well as some quills from the local ravens and sulphur crested cockatoos.

I usually grind my own ink from sticks for calligraphy, but when in a hurry I use a good quality bottled Chinese ink.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2008, 11:16:53 pm by Prof Eumides Blakehurst » Logged

There is no god and Dawkins is his prophet.
Flynn MacCallister
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Australia Australia


Mad SCIENTIST!


WWW
« Reply #186 on: July 07, 2008, 12:45:52 pm »

(Prof. Blakehurst: the content of your spoiler needs to read:


[ spoiler ] [ img ]http://cdn.www.officedepot.com/pictures/SK/LG/310640_sk_lg.jpg[ /img ] [ /spoiler ],

or if you want the image to be linked,

[ spoiler ] [ url=www.yoururl.com ] [ img ]www.yourimage.jpg[ /img ] [ /url ][ /spoiler ]. )
Logged
Prof Eumides Blakehurst
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia


Scientist by Training, Mad by Practice.


« Reply #187 on: July 07, 2008, 11:18:18 pm »

Thank you Miss McCallister.

I was definitely being a bear of very little brain yesterday due to life.  Sad

All fixed now (on both fronts I hope).
Logged
Zwack
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States

And introducing the wonderful Irish (Mrs Z).


« Reply #188 on: August 06, 2009, 01:06:50 am »

I thought that I would add to this post as...

I now have an Esterbrook SJ Model with a 9556 nib in Cobalt Blue.

The Waterman's 452 1/2V that I think I mentioned before.

And a custom made brass fountain pen (a standard insert made into a pen with some Winchester .270 cartridges).

I have to say that I am finding it much more enjoyable to write with a good fountain pen than a cheap ball point.

My wife's collection now includes a WWI trench art dip pen made with a contemporary nib and is actually fun to write with.

Z.
Logged

"At least those oddballs are interesting" - My Wife.
I'm British but living in America.  This might explain my spelling.
Heliomance
Officer
***
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #189 on: August 06, 2009, 07:38:22 pm »

I use a Lamy Safari, with the standard blue ink cartridges normally. It improves my handwriting to the point of legibility, but it is still not what you'd call aesthetically pleasing. I have considered starting to use a dip pen - quill or otherwise - purely for the image, but ink bottles in lecture theatres seems like a recipe for disaster.
Logged
stardust
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


friend of polar bear


« Reply #190 on: August 06, 2009, 07:43:26 pm »

i use a bog standard parker pen for daily use. it has a refilable cartridge so i have an old travellers inkwell made of leather and brass which i carry spare ink in.

for calligraphy i have several parker nibs but also a dipping quill with copperplate nibs, which i love, though it's very battered. i've got my eye on a calligraphy set on ebay so i may be adding to my collection very shortly. Grin
Logged

and doesn't Mr. Kipling make exceedingly good cakes.......
Zwack
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States

And introducing the wonderful Irish (Mrs Z).


« Reply #191 on: November 01, 2009, 10:58:45 pm »

Top five commonly encountered problems with dip pens.

4. Wrong ink. (or old ink). Inks that are formulated for fountain pens may not work well for dip pens and visa versa. Pure india ink is great, but you need to clean your nibs religiously.

Ummm, it's safer to use ink formulated for fountain pens in dip pens than they other way round.  Non fountain pen ink contains Shellac which can seriously gum up a fountain pen.  

For a good range of inks try J Herbin, Noodlers or Private Reserve.  Having said that I have Noodlers, J, Herbin, Pelikan and an old bottle of Carter's permanent blue-black ink.  

Some inks are very acidic (particularly blue-black ones) and they can damage a modern pen if left in there too long.  Some old pens are made from a milk derived plastic (a caseinate) so be very careful if trying to soak an old "plastic" pen to clean it up.

Z.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2009, 11:02:06 pm by Zwack » Logged
Herr Klinger
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


Hmmm... Must shoot better photos...


« Reply #192 on: November 01, 2009, 11:51:26 pm »

I have a Duke with a snakeskin pattern for writing in general, and my prize pen is a stainless steel Rotring. It has a pressure system that supposedly allows the ink to flow correctly on air flights, but it looks so much like a weapon you probably couldn't get it on a plane these days.

Also, Noodler ink all the way. I've tried Montblanc ink and Waterman cartridges, and Noodler is superior in my opinion. They have high security document ink that is just fantastic.

http://www.noodlersink.com/
Logged

"In what country is there a place for people like me?"
~ Andrew Ryan
Sir A Poiselamppe
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Inventor of the Homing Battenburgram


WWW
« Reply #193 on: November 02, 2009, 12:11:20 am »

When I have to I use one of these



not pretty but effective.... also a .7 propelling pencil

*edit for spelling* must have bee more tired than I thought
« Last Edit: November 02, 2009, 12:47:47 pm by Sir A Poiselamppe » Logged

Mr Peter Harrow, Esq
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Fellow of the Victorian Steampunk Society


« Reply #194 on: November 02, 2009, 01:52:13 am »

I make my own fountain pens, you can get kits from woodturning suppliers, which are a brass inner sleeve nib and connectors, intended to have a wooden outer sleeve.

You can instead outer sleeve the pens in brass and copper. The also do solid pen boxes which quite nicely take brass additions.
Logged

Proudly giving the entire Asylum The Finger!
Lady Charis Bethquin
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom



WWW
« Reply #195 on: November 02, 2009, 04:16:47 pm »

Like stardust, at work I use a standard Parker.

I've always thought that I was strange in that using ballpoint pens makes my skin crawl slightly (it's the way it schritches on the paper....urgh even thinking of it is making me cringe...).

When I was at school we were taught to write 'joined up' and made to use fountain pens. I think I was the only person at school that continued to use one once it wasn't compulsory (once we joined high school).

Does anyone know if children are still taught to write using fountain pens? I would imagine not....
Logged

The Owl and the Pussy-cat went to sea,
In a beautiful pea green boat,
They took some honey, and plenty of money,
Wrapped up in a five pound note.
Vienna Fahrmann
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Austria Austria


« Reply #196 on: November 02, 2009, 11:06:16 pm »


   I suspect that penmanship study in schools is practically non-existent.  Fortunately, there are a fair number of classes offered in different places for those who want to learn it outside of a compulsory school experience.

     Vienna
Logged
stardust
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


friend of polar bear


« Reply #197 on: November 02, 2009, 11:14:19 pm »

my friends teenage daughter was round at the weekend and asked if she could borrow a pen so i handed her my parker and she looked at it like it was an alien.

she then attempted to write with it and couldn't, needing to use a biro to finish what she was doing.

it made me very sad to see something so simple and beautiful vanish in a generation.
Logged
Captain Quinlin Hopkins
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States



WWW
« Reply #198 on: November 03, 2009, 12:03:23 am »

Fairly surprised no one here has mentioned silverpoint.  

Do just a bit of research on it and you'll probably fall in love with.  Traditional is fully hardened, but a fully annealed version can be used with great success.    

a place to start:

Not for everyday writing, but I do enjoy sketching, and the permanence this has lends itself well to archival drawings.  If everyone had to put forth effort to write in this method, there would be more profound words written and less incoherent babel. 
« Last Edit: November 03, 2009, 12:36:22 am by Captain Quinlin Hopkins » Logged

Sincerely,
Captain Quinlin Hopkins (Hoppy)

Do not ignore the freedoms of someone else, for eventually you will be someone else! 

DFW Steampunk Illumination Society
Zwack
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States

And introducing the wonderful Irish (Mrs Z).


« Reply #199 on: November 03, 2009, 02:04:27 am »

Fairly surprised no one here has mentioned silverpoint.  

Which means that you haven't read the entire thread.  I do actually carry and use a metalpoint at times.

Z.
Logged
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 [8] 9   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.273 seconds with 16 queries.