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Author Topic: Fountain Pens & writing implements...what do you use?  (Read 30145 times)
Vienna Fahrmann
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« on: July 23, 2007, 05:55:22 pm »


     I'm currently looking for less modern writing implements to flesh out my usual set of pocket accessories (I'm an accessory fiend) & wondered what others use.  I have a beautiful fountain pen that belonged to my father, but I never take it anywhere for fear of loss (I have very few items that belonged to him).  I've been looking at buying a new pen & found some that are truly works of art, & priced as such.  I'm hoping to find or make something a little unusual looking without breaking the bank.  What do you use for writing?
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rogue_designer
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« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2007, 06:00:28 pm »

I carry everywhere, a Rotring series 600 trio (blue, red pens, and a .7mm pencil) It is solid aluminum, and works flawlessly day after day.

I also have started carrying again, a low level Aurora fountain pen with a medium nib (and Pelikan blue tinte ink). This is relatively inexpensive (less than $100usd) but with a very well made, smooth nib. A pleasure to use, but not so precious that I'm over worried if I drop it, or loan it someone.

(both get a regular workout in my various moleskine notebooks - so much handier than a PDA, even if they can't send email)
« Last Edit: July 23, 2007, 11:52:10 pm by rogue_designer » Logged

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Strange-Sara
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« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2007, 09:17:31 pm »

...
I also have started carrying again, a low level Aurora fountain pen with a medium nib (and Pelikan blue tinte ink). This is relatively inexpensive (less than $100usd) but with a very well made, smooth nib. A pleasure to use, but not so precious that I'm over worried if I drop it, or loan it someone.
...

We have VERY different ideas of what counts as "relatively inexpensive".  Smiley  I use a quasi disposable ($4) fountain pen, which I refill with higher quality ink.  It is a of clear emerald plastic, but is quite attractive to my eye, and writes beautifully (although I need to change nibs eery few months) 
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« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2007, 09:25:51 pm »

I seem to suffer from that strange affliction that dissolves pencils and ballpens. (My family, and especially my sister vehemently assure that they are not in cause.)

I have thus had to go round this problem and collected nibs, pen holders, quills. I have gathered around 40 different nibs, but do not use all of them.
I have so far only used simple pen holders, the more comfortable I found. I have also been given an old pen holder that was made as advertising support. The nib is concealed in the tip, which can be taken out and reversed.  I still have to find a safe way to carry ink around, though.
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hobbitt
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« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2007, 09:28:53 pm »

I have several fountain pens.  I made a small case for them from a cigar box with foam and velvet.

They have a variety of inks in them, grading papers, notes, a blue ink which cannot be scanned by a copier.

There are new inks now that are water based.  I use Noodlers.  The labels of them are quite Victorian.

Do not get the ones with the cartridges.  They dry out much to easily. If you have one of those you can purchase a piston separately, which lets you draw the ink in.

Considering the price of the pens, the fact that I do not have to buy replacements, the prestige I get from students when they realize the difference and the shear pleasure I get from using them, they are well worth it.
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gpalmer
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« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2007, 09:37:47 pm »

I used to use fountain pens, and quite enjoy them.  However, I also lose them routinely, and even the cheap ones at $5 each are not worthwhile then.  Therefore, I generally use rollerballs and such for daily longhand writing.

Art and calligraphy on the other hand use a dip pen and nib, glass pen, or brush.  Windsor and Newton shellac-based india ink for anything but calligraphy.  A decent waterproof ink with a better flow than that for calligraphy (I'd love to use the W&N - so shiny - but it clogs the pen with speed)

Grace D. Palmer
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rogue_designer
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« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2007, 09:42:39 pm »

gpalmer - you should take a look at the noodlers "bulletproof" inks. They don't clog, but have something in them that chemically binds with cellulose, so they become permanent only once they hit paper.  Nice flow, great lightfastness and depth, and a good color range. I think they even have a glossier range.

I still like my pelikan tinte, but that's just me being stubborn.

Strange-Sara - yes I agree. Mostly I say relatively affordable, because the performance and feel is very much like that of fountain pens costing hundreds upon hundreds of dollars. The Aurora represents a value within a luxury category. I do like the Lamy Safari, and the Rotring fountain pens that are much cheaper when really knocking about - but I've been spoiled by the higher quality nibs for any large quantity of writing.
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Robotguy
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« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2007, 11:34:14 pm »

In my pocket protector (I wear a pocket protector which says "Team Geek") I carry a Lamy Vista extra-fine filled with custom pine scented Noodler's Forest Green (from Pendemonium). They don't seem to carry the pine scent anymore, I've had it for about 2 years now and have used about 1/8 of the bottle. The scent and color are actually very subtle, since it's a very dark green.

I also carry an aluminum Ohto Super Pro-Mecha 0.3mm mechanical pencil and a mechanical eraser.

Yes, I am an electrical engineer.
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gpalmer
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« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2007, 01:54:19 am »

gpalmer - you should take a look at the noodlers "bulletproof" inks. They don't clog, but have something in them that chemically binds with cellulose, so they become permanent only once they hit paper.  Nice flow, great lightfastness and depth, and a good color range. I think they even have a glossier range.

Thank you!  I have ordered a vial of their bulletproof black.  It's about the same price as quality drawing ink.  It now remains to be seen how it functions in a nib pen (being designed for fountain pens) and whether or not it will withstand watercoloring.  If so, I believe we will have a new champion! Smiley

Grace D. Palmer
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phuphuphnik
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« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2007, 03:41:21 am »

I use an Esterbrook Red marbled pen, with a fine nib. and Parker Quink. Jet black.
Have used it from 6th grade on. (about 20 years)
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Vienna Fahrmann
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« Reply #10 on: July 25, 2007, 02:38:15 am »


     Thank you for the pen & ink ideas, i'm looking forward to finding some newwriting implements.

     Vienna
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Prof. George of Chaos
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« Reply #11 on: July 25, 2007, 05:09:57 am »

Sad to say for everyday purposes I generally find myself using a none-too-sharp drawing or writing pencil, or a ballpoint (I find bic disposable tends to write on skin a little better than my parker spring loaded refillable), but for something intended for another's eyes, or to last, it is a different story. I have a few different types of fountain pen (two from calligraphy sets and two from the historical reenactmentary amusements at Sovereign Hill near Melbourne, and the three dip ones serve me rather better than the cartridge), any number of flourescent inks in ballpoint form, a fondness for sharpies, curiously enough, as well as a bright red portable Olivetti Valentine typewriter for which I toiled at pulling boards in the sun for days to get from my father after he, thinking he was doing me a favour, bought it ahead of me from the purveyor of antiques. Along with these I've an ambition to gather to me a Venetian glass dip pen, as I once had the oppertunity to try one and it was simply the finest feeling my hand has ever had while writing. And those inks!
Actually! Would any of you fine chaps and chapettes have the knowledge of manufacturing typewriter ribbon? I have some difficulty finding the stuff, and I would dearly love to type out notes and radiographic telegrams in more exotic colours than red and black (wonderful colours as they are) anyhow. Can you imagine recieveing a note typed out in blacklight ink?

One further aside in regards to writing implements, I rather admire the ancient use of stylus and wax. Most of the advantages of a slate and chalk, but without that hideous sound. I must make a set and try it out sometime soon...
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« Reply #12 on: July 25, 2007, 08:03:30 am »

I use a quasi disposable ($4) fountain pen, which I refill with higher quality ink.  It is a of clear emerald plastic, but is quite attractive to my eye, and writes beautifully (although I need to change nibs eery few months) 


For my everyday writing, I have some special needs.  I write math six to eight hours a day, and this requires a very fine point pen (as I sometimes need to put two subscripts and a superscript on one letter).  Also, because I grade papers, draw graphs, and annotate things, I need multiple colors.  I use Staedtler Triplus Fineliners.  They are the greatest pens ever.  (Not to sound like a commercial; I really do just love them.)  They are about $7US for a pack of 10 colors (although the yellow is basically worthless, as it's too light to be seen, even for underlining).  They also come in all black packs.  They are tiny little felt tips, shod in steel.  The barrels are steel and traingular.  They almost never dry out (it takes about 3 days of no lid) and when they do, standing them upside overnight with the lid on resurrects them.  For me (I write quite hard) they wear out in about 4 months (the tip gets all smooshed down into the steel).  They don't smudge or smear, and neither do they bleed through the paper.  Save for the yellow, all the colors are dark enough to read easily.  I like the brown in particular; I think it looks very "old timey".  Anyhow, sorry for my ramblings; they really are great pens.  My hands used to hurt all the time from writing so much, but no more! 



I also like sharpies a lot.  In particular, I use them quite a bit in talisman creation, as they put sigils on anything.  Why else are they called "magic markers"? Wink
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Prof. Rane, MA
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« Reply #13 on: July 25, 2007, 11:07:55 am »

the shear pleasure I get

On behalf of my hair and facial hair, I simply must take offence, sir!

(Sorry about that... and it's not even in-topic. I won't do it again, I promise.)
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MrFats
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« Reply #14 on: July 25, 2007, 01:36:45 pm »

I carry with me, at all times, a balanced G2 Pilot.. as well as a Staedtler mechanical pencil and plastic eraser. I am not sure of the exact name, for the pen, but it's very light, and writes very smoothly. As for fountain pens, nib pens and the like, I do not have one. I intend to purchase one in the near future, and appreciate all the ideas for good writing implements.
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Dr von Zarkov
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« Reply #15 on: July 25, 2007, 02:24:55 pm »

I use an Esterbrook Red marbled pen, with a fine nib. and Parker Quink. Jet black.
Have used it from 6th grade on. (about 20 years)
Indeed, the very brand of fountain-pen which we have used! In USA these are still to be found at flea markets and garage sales at most reasonable prices. We own several and keep spare nibs on hand. When the bladders dry out, pen "hospitals", found in large cities, come to the rescue.

A quart bottle of blue Quink bought 25 years ago still serves us well.

A few Rapidograph drafting-pens sit on the desk.

Away from home and the laboratory, von Zarkov prefers the convenience of Pilot Precise V5 Rolling Ball pens with Extra Fine points.
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heavyporker
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« Reply #16 on: July 29, 2007, 12:14:01 pm »

 AH! Now I realize what I have. I bought a lovely glass dip pen from a novelty rag because the idea captivated me. It's fun to write with, but the glass tip (the writing tip is a double-helix of glass) scratches on paper a bit and it's a bit aggravating trying to keep in mind how much writing I can do with each tip (it's something like four or five words each dip).

 I never realized that there were so many types of ink just for fountain and dip pens. The pine-scented ink sounds LOVELY! Why did they stop selling it, and can it be found anywhere else?
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SomewhatSavvy
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« Reply #17 on: July 31, 2007, 05:16:25 am »

I myself have a couple of basic calligraphy pens and almost 40+ different kinds of nibs. For those I had begun by using some black India ink and some red ink that are both, no joke, actually from the 50's and still worked perfectly. I have recently purchased some brown, emerald, and gold ink as well (though I've had some trouble with the green and gold working properly). I have inkwells, but I generally dip from the bottle for convenience sake Roll Eyes. I own one of those cartridge-fill fountain pens that I purchased from a yard sale and have only just recently started messing with it. For everyday use, generally Sharpies suffice, but I used to carry around a couple of these:
but for some inexplicable reason, the tips of them bend. I don't bend them while a write, but at some point I'll open one and the tip will be bent Huh. And as a point of interest: I once fell asleep in bed while using one of these pens-this is a very bad idea-I had gargantuan blue ink blotches all over my sheets and comforter and it took several washes to fade out sufficiently.
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NoraBray
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« Reply #18 on: August 01, 2007, 03:40:06 am »

For my everyday writing, I have some special needs.  I write math six to eight hours a day, and this requires a very fine point pen (as I sometimes need to put two subscripts and a superscript on one letter).  Also, because I grade papers, draw graphs, and annotate things, I need multiple colors.  I use Staedtler Triplus Fineliners.  They are the greatest pens ever. 


Those are great, my set is still going 2 years on, though I use them less than I used too.

Other than those I have all manners of writing/drawing tools as can be seen bellow.. (this doesnt include various other pieces that are in boxes next to the desk..  Tongue or to the other side which is even messier, working on more and better storage Tongue

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Prof. George of Chaos
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« Reply #19 on: August 01, 2007, 11:23:01 am »

Pencils yes, rulers and compasses and other shapedrawing tools yes, brushes yes, highlighters yes, a sharpie certainly, pens and charcoal absolutely, but a plastic fork?!
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NoraBray
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« Reply #20 on: August 01, 2007, 11:26:02 am »

Those are the best.. from those noodle bowls... great for multiple line inks.. texturing and various other things.. like eating.. Don't mix art supplies and eating... I also have bamboo skewers, plastic knives, cotton tip thingys and medical gauze in my art stuff Smiley Im sure there is other things I haven't mentioned.. Tongue I am an art student after all.. Tongue
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Lady QE
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« Reply #21 on: August 02, 2007, 10:38:33 am »

but a plastic fork?!

Its ok....it has green elastics on it.....
Wink

As for fountain pens....ick....tried 'em, hate 'em. How anyone managed to draw patents with the damn things is beyond me. I guess I tend to be a bit too heavy handed, and usually end up splitting the nibs. Give me a lead based (oh fine.....graphite based) technical pencil with a good india rubber any old day.
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NoraBray
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« Reply #22 on: August 02, 2007, 10:56:08 am »

Actually there are multiple forks.. Tongue you might like a speedball nib.. its big and can probably take the harsh use.. though you want to stay away from mapping nibs.. those are 1mm points  or less Cheesy I love those the most.. ifyou arent careful though you mess the paper up big time..  Tongue
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Lady QE
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« Reply #23 on: August 02, 2007, 11:31:45 am »

Nope nope, not for me.....if I have to use ink, for maybe inking a humorous cartoon or such, I'll use one of those new fangled razor-point pens.

Otherwise, the Wikipedia thoroughly endorses pencils as steampunk utensils...."England continued to enjoy a monopoly on the production of pencils until a method of reconstituting the graphite powder was found. The distinctively square English pencils continued to be made with sticks cut from natural graphite into the 1860s."

Pencils are the uber cool.
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Rosel
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« Reply #24 on: August 02, 2007, 01:36:54 pm »

and if you sharpen the pencil with a pen knife then you get a nice flowy look to the writing.
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