The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 19, 2017, 06:45:10 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 [3]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Mexican Steampunk {{Bicentennial Edition}}  (Read 42399 times)
dreambig
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #50 on: July 09, 2013, 04:14:48 am »

Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

Just bumping this thread on account that at the Mexican Steampunk forum someone posted this magnificent movie trailer.  The trailer advertises a historically-based fictional drama ("El Atentado" / "The [Assassination] Attempt") surrounding the last president prior to the Mexican Revolution.  The movie has been criticized on content, but the cinematography, the costumes and uniforms regarding Victorian/Edwardian-Era Mexico are nothing short of exquisite.  Really worth a look.

From the channel of AlebrijeCineyVideo in YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/AlebrijeCineyVideo

El Atentado (Trailer oficial Alta resolución)




I think I'm going to watch that film!
Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #51 on: July 09, 2013, 04:49:44 am »

Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

Just bumping this thread on account that at the Mexican Steampunk forum someone posted this magnificent movie trailer.  The trailer advertises a historically-based fictional drama ("El Atentado" / "The [Assassination] Attempt") surrounding the last president prior to the Mexican Revolution.  The movie has been criticized on content, but the cinematography, the costumes and uniforms regarding Victorian/Edwardian-Era Mexico are nothing short of exquisite.  Really worth a look.

From the channel of AlebrijeCineyVideo in YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/AlebrijeCineyVideo

El Atentado (Trailer oficial Alta resolución)




I think I'm going to watch that film!


The film depicts the leading years before the Mexican Revolution (Civil War) of 1910.  The president of Mexico at the time was Porfirio Diaz, who had, by the time of the revolution, become a dictator in the eyes of many Mexicans, particularly the poor with closer ethnic roots to the Native Mesoamerican in Mexico.

The problem was that after the French Intervention on the 1860's, Mexico had become very pro-foreign and pro European, with many economic interests and technological ventures being given priority over the tremendous disparity among the Mexican social classes. A large number of non-Spanish European migrants (many wealthy) came into Mexico from France and Italy among other places (I have family from that period http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,3469.msg808662.html#msg808662 ) seeking economic opportunity by establishing factories and private enterprise, while there was still a tremendous disparity between social classes.  President Diaz had pushed many of the pro-western policies that were responsible for the creation of the heavy industry and national railway system in that country (read: Steampunk ideas).

So depending on what part of society you came from, Porfirio Diaz was either a stalwart harbinger of progress and Western culture, or an evil dictator hell-bent on exploiting the lower classes which invariably were more Native than European in every sense of the word (ironic given that Porfirio Diaz himself came from the lower classes).  The civil war was entirely based on addressing the disparity between classes and the favoritism toward foreign interests.

The movie is a fictional drama about an assassination attempt on Porfirio Diaz, based on real history, so they paid a lot of attention to the costuming and the scenes in the movie.

The reviews for the acting itself were not that good, but this is a great period movie, and it brings you a bit closer to what Mexican Steampunk could be based upon. I've already drawn the analogy between the Meiji period in Japan and the Reforma / Revolucion periods in Mexico, in terms of fashion, class distinction and industrialization...  What is great about this movie is that it graphically depicts all these socio-political aspects I'm talking about, while at the same time giving you a taste for Mexican culture at least visually.

Thereafter adaptation of these visual cues for Steampunk purposes becomes an easy task.  

 
« Last Edit: July 09, 2013, 04:58:56 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #52 on: July 17, 2013, 04:50:13 am »

An interesting concept.  It looks like Mexico City is following Tokyo's example and generating live music and art events using the club scene and mixing with Steampunk. A perfectly sensible approach that has worked well in Japan. In this case a "Steampunk Dark Cabaret" show, dubbed the "Mechanical Cabaret Faire," taking place this Saturday July 27.

https://www.facebook.com/events/678804518800693/
Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #53 on: September 15, 2013, 10:12:56 am »

Tonight, ladies and gentlemen is the 203rd anniverasary of Mexico's Independence from Spain,  Technically the event happened on midnight of September 15 of 1810 (the actual celebration if the 16th. of September), when a friar by the name of Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, a son of Spanish migrants suddenly renounced the cloth and rang a parish bell calling for independence.  The war for independence would continue for 11 years until 1821.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_War_of_Independence
Quote
Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, a local priest and member of a group of educated Criollos, in Querétaro, hosted secret gatherings in his home to discuss whether it was better to obey or to revolt against a tyrannical government, which is what he considered the Spanish government in Mexico to be. These meetings came to include famed military leader Ignacio Allende. In 1810 Hidalgo arrived at the conclusion that a revolt against the colonial government was needed because of the events and injustice being perpetrated upon the poor of Mexico, which had gotten out of hand. By this time Hidalgo had achieved some notoriety. He had distinguished himself as a student at the prestigious San Nicolás Obispo school in Valladolid (now Morelia), where he received top marks in class and later went on to become Rector of his old school. Later he also became known as a top theologian. When his older brother died in 1803, Hidalgo took over as Priest for the town of Dolores.[3]

Hidalgo was in Dolores on September 15, 1810, with other leaders of the rebel "conspiracy" including military commander Allende, when word came to them that the conspiracy had been found out. Needing to move immediately, Hidalgo ran to the church, calling for all the people to gather, where from the pulpit he called upon them to revolt. Being inspired and tired of their ill-treatment by the wealthy (who had befriended the Spaniards) and the Spanish, they all shouted in agreement for such a revolt. They were a comparatively small group, and poorly armed with whatever was at their disposal. Some only had sticks and rocks as weapons. On the morning of September 16, 1810, Hidalgo called upon the remaining locals who happened to be in the market on that day, and again, from the pulpit, he announced his intention to strike for independence and exhorted the people of Dolores to join him. Most did: Hidalgo had an army of some 600 men within minutes. This became known as the “Cry of Dolores” as the people shouted, or "cried", from the church "independencia!"

Hidalgo and Allende marched their little army through towns including San Miguel and Celaya, and where the angry rebels killed all the Spaniards they found. Along the way they adopted the standard of the Virgin of Guadalupe as their symbol and protector. They soon reached the town of Guanajuato on September 28th, where the Spanish had barricaded themselves inside the public granary. Included in that barricade were some forced royalists, creoles that served and sided with the Spanish. The small rebel army had reached about 30,000 by this time and the battle was horrific. Over 500 Spanish and creoles were killed. The rebels now marched on toward Mexico City.



So I use this occasion to bump this thread as it will become slightly more active in the next few months.  There are several subjects I usually write on toward the end of the year and besides Mexican history in the 19th. C there is usually the subject of the Day of the Dead (see http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,27548.0.html) and other threads where I promote Mexican culture as a possible international alternative aspect on Steampunk.

So I open this season with some images (Facebook) and a video (rather noisy you may turn the volume down) of the first Steampunk art exposition organised by the Steampunk Mexico members in Mexico City last year (7-9th November 2012):

The Facebook page for the event: https://www.facebook.com/retrofuturismo.steampunk.en.mexico

And video filmed on location:
Preview - Trailer de la Exposiciòn "Retrofuturismo: Steampunk en Mèxico .3gp


In other news, I have written before that I have noticed that the Day of the Dead is making so much presence in English speaking countries (even in the UK!) that it's becoming rather ubiquitous to see flowery skulls and other tropes associated with the holiday in fashion and such.  Today I had the surprise of seeing a large supermarket chain in Texas (HEB and one of the largest chains in the US), offer a Day of the Dead set of hand painted dishware (including main course plate, salad soup bowl and tea/coffee cups) as part of their Halloween merchandise promotion (yes I know, it is always like this; not even October and stores are pushing Halloween already). Whenever I can I will take a snapshot of the merchandise in question as I found it rather curious that someone would sell that at a regular supermarket.  Hell must be freezing over, as usually it is Mexican teacher who are entrusted with the task of promoting the national folkloric heritage and preventing it from being washed away by the Halloween celebrations which are separated by a single day (the three dates are The Day of  Halloween (Oct. 31) The Day of All Saints (Nov. 1), and the Day of the Dead (Nov. 2), but apparently this is becoming a bona-fide Mexican cultural export, that is reaching far and wide.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Day_of_the_Dead

My version of a personal Steampunk Day of the Dead altar in 2010

« Last Edit: October 02, 2014, 06:33:41 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #54 on: November 01, 2013, 03:35:44 am »

La Catrina: Folkloric, Political, and All Mexican

Dear ladies and gentlemen:  if you have peered through the fashion and photography circles, you may have noted that the Mexican Day of the Dead icons have found a place in the heart of those who wish to make a statement, and not necessarily only during the Halloween/Day of the Dead scene.


(If embedding is disabled - you can click here: http://youtu.be/0zWS7Vz1IC4)
La Catrina Mexicana


Day of the Dead on Pinterest (apparently, it is a very appealing subject in feminine circles)
http://www.pinterest.com/exaybachay/day-of-the-dead/

Photos: 666 Photography, Austin, Texas.  Model and Makeup Artist: Lisa Naeyaert
http://host.pappapak8.com/~photogra/catalog.php?item=97&catid=6&ret=catalog.php%3Fcategory%3D6
http://host.pappapak8.com/~photogra/catalog.php?item=95&catid=6&ret=catalog.php?category=6
~ ~ ~


As it happens one particular character stands out and is sometimes mentioned now to the point of meme:  La Catrina.


La Calavera Catrina ("The elegant skeleton") is the representation of a female human skeleton in Edwardian Era clothes, or more precisely the representation of a young dead bride dressed in the style of the high-society in Mexico around during the Edwardian period.

The character actually was conceived by illustrator Jose Guadalupe Posada as a wood block print sometime between 1910-13, right after the Mexican civil war, as a political parody of the class divisions in Mexican society.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Calavera_Catrina

You see, at the time, the Mexican high society tended to have deep ethnic and cultural ties to Europe, being comprised of people with higher percentage of European blood, and who invariably occupied the higher social strata. The problem was exacerbated by a massive influx of immigrants from non-Spanish speaking countries in the late 19th. C, namely immigrants from France and Italy, such that a Europeanised society had cemented itself in the heart of Mexico in the capital, Mexico City and surrounding cities.

The president of Mexico prior to the civil war had strongly favoured foreign interests, most notably American and British, due to the industrial progress they bestowed to Mexico, namely the oil industry and the railways system.  It is in fact the social backlash against the perceived favouritism of foreigners what caused the civil war of 1910.

Those elegant people of the upper classes were referred to as "Catrines" according to the slang of the period.  But the artist, JG Posada was not aiming at the high society, but rather at those Mexicans who pretended to belong to those foreign wealthy classes.  He was in fact, criticizing the betrayal of Mexican culture and values by those who would rather side with the foreign and the wealthy.  In fact, the original name Posada gave the print is "La Calavera Garbancera," where Garbacero was an epithet against people who posed as Europeans due to the perceived notion that Spaniards ate a lot of garbazo beans!  The name was later (and mercifully) dropped in favour "La Calavera Catrina."

Being surrounded by so much death during the war, it would not feel out of place for images of skeletons (traditional in the Mesomaerican celebrations of the day of the dead) to be used by artists and incorporated into the popular culture of the time.  Besides the religious processions related to the Day Day of the Dead and Day of All Saints, itself a result of the blending of Christian and pagan customs, there were a number of customs around these dates designed to make and poke fun at death itself.  One of those customs is to write short satirical poems or epitaphs about living relatives and friends, in a manner similar to the American "roast," where one is poking fun at people in a polite way.

Popular youth-historian group "Bully Magnets" take on the history of "La Catrina"
La Catrina - Bully Magnets


Quote
"La Catrina has become the referential image of Death in Mexico, it is common to see her embodied as part of the celebrations of Day of the Dead throughout the country; she has become a motive for the creation of handcrafts made from clay or other materials, her representations may vary, as well as the hat."
-Juan G. Posada


So La Catrina was part "roast" part folkloric and all-Mexican.  She is now part of history and folklore. Or is she? Now, I see her walking down the catwalks of Paris.  This begs the question: if we see more images of Lady Catrina in popular culture around the world is this a type of presage, or reflection of our times?


J. Wilhelm
USAS Orca
« Last Edit: November 01, 2013, 09:59:06 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #55 on: October 01, 2014, 07:32:20 am »

Necromancy on account of some pictures and sounds I found on the Aetherweb.

Apparently the Steampunk-inspired music scene is also proliferating down in Mexico and I had not heard so far in these few years from any Mexican Steampunk music groups.

Well here is one, La Non Plus Ultra Orkesta (The Non Plus Ultra Orkestra [sic]), from Mexico City, who classify their genre (quite correctly) as "World Music," but I hear quite a bit of Dark Cabaret.  Quite a bit of carnival and circus inspired music, but nonetheless noteworthy for their existence alone...

HQ Music samples (recommend the first song here - "My Life Hurts"  which is the same as in the first video below):
https://www.facebook.com/lanonplusultraorkesta/app_2405167945

Did I hear a bit of "Steam Tango" in The Last Train?

Pictures:
https://www.facebook.com/lanonplusultraorkesta/photos_stream

Low-Q videos from shot on stage:

La Vida me Duele (My Life Hurts)
La Non Plus Ultra Orkesta - La vida me duele


El Ultimo Tren (The Last Train)
La Non Plus ultra Orkesta El último tren


Miscellaneous videos
La Non Plus Ultra Orkesta ( Comparsa La Bulla)
« Last Edit: October 01, 2014, 07:44:05 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #56 on: October 01, 2014, 08:53:54 pm »

(Snip)
In other news, I have written before that I have noticed that the Day of the Dead is making so much presence in English speaking countries (even in the UK!) that it's becoming rather ubiquitous to see flowery skulls and other tropes associated with the holiday in fashion and such.  Today I had the surprise of seeing a large supermarket chain in Texas (HEB and one of the largest chains in the US), offer a Day of the Dead set of hand painted dishware (including main course plate, salad soup bowl and tea/coffee cups) as part of their Halloween merchandise promotion (yes I know, it is always like this; not even October and stores are pushing Halloween already). Whenever I can I will take a snapshot of the merchandise in question as I found it rather curious that someone would sell that at a regular supermarket.  Hell must be freezing over, as usually it is Mexican teacher who are entrusted with the task of promoting the national folkloric heritage and preventing it from being washed away by the Halloween celebrations which are separated by a single day (the three dates are The Day of  Halloween (Oct. 31) The Day of All Saints (Nov. 1), and the Day of the Dead (Nov. 2), but apparently this is becoming a bona-fide Mexican cultural export, that is reaching far and wide.

Indeed, my youngest has chosen a Day of the Dead inspired outfit for this year's Halloween. Not you would want to let my two near the elegant sugar skull you reference, because it wouldn't be around for too long...

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #57 on: October 02, 2014, 06:39:36 am »

Yes, I guess...  Cheesy  But sugar skulls are not meant to last very long   Cheesy I tried making them from real sugar once. A real mess, since you have to mix sugar with beaten egg whites, mold and allow to dry. Mine were "melting" so in a desperate attempt I put them in the freezer to cool and dry.  The skulls I made didn't last more that one hour because my grandfather (who already suffered from dementia at the time) found them in the freezer and dispatched them before I could get to them...  The one you see is made from Sculpey (thankfully he didn't eat that).
Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #58 on: April 12, 2015, 07:43:20 am »

In looking to post some videos regarding Central American Steampunk, I stumbled upon this Mexican video.

It had occurred to me that a great deal has been said lately about the apparent frivolity of Steampunk. Whether or not we are glorifying the inhumanity of humanity during the Industrial Revolution. Whether Steampunk can be used as a political message.

Does Steampunk have a higher purpose in society?  I say yes.  Here's a statement being made by way of what could easily be categorised as Steampunk art. And if not Steampunk -I can easily envision a Mexican Steampunk project with a similar message.  A constructive criticism of humanity by way of the conversion of killing instruments to musical instruments.


Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.72 seconds with 16 queries.