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Author Topic: Mexican Steampunk {{Bicentennial Edition}}  (Read 42417 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #25 on: June 20, 2011, 12:29:54 am »

Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

I have a NEWSFLASH!

As the Cronopia convention unfolds, we are starting to get some pictures from the event.  The picture below is the first to be released by the Steampunk Mexico Forum group in attendance:


Members from (mostly) Mexico City and Guadalajara assisted this convention (see details above in previous posts), which took place inside an ex-convent in Downtown Guadalajara, and actually had an opportunity to make a presentation to the public promoting the Anachronistic Arts.  Thanks to a Mexican tradition of public and private arts patronage, similar Literature/Cosplay and *now* Steampunk conventions are expected to occur at least bi-annually in that country from what I can gather from advertisement for the events!

Keep tuned, as I'll make sure to keep you posted as this event wraps up this weekend!

Cheers

EDIT: June 20, 2011

We have more photographic Daguerrotypes today! (As soon as we get a compendium, I will give a link the the photo set).
Cheers,
J. Wilhelm
The discussion panel/presentation contingent from the Steampunk Mexico forum.  The chap with the white shirt,  waistcoast and goggles is Mr. "Lukyan Corvinus", bonafide lycanthrope, and founder of the forum (all images hosted on Imageshack):



A few of the Steampunk Mexico forum members having some fun.  Do you want to know how cool these guys are?  OK Ask yourself, which other steampunk group has as a member a priest, that is, a  man of the cloth, specifically a "Prior" (head of a monastery, center-left) building vampire-obliterating weapons?


« Last Edit: October 01, 2014, 09:11:49 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

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« Reply #26 on: June 27, 2011, 07:27:52 pm »

Thank you so much for sharing this!  The Steampunk Mexico forum is awesome.  I do believe it may save my Spanish skills, which are growing dusty from disuse.

Obviously there are many skilled steampunks out there.  I'd love to add a bit of Latin flavor to my Steampunk...  For the hats, colors, and facial hair alone.

You know what we really need?  Which I realize is more Spanish than Mexican?

Steampunk Flamenco. 
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« Reply #27 on: June 28, 2011, 12:52:45 am »

I should warn you the most rigorously correct Spanish in it's most "flowery" mode, as we Steampunks tend to write and speak, can be quite daunting, as the vocabulary is substantially larger and fuller of archaic terms.  We have a lawyer in the forum who makes my head spin with "archaic-babble" and Spanish is my first language.

---
Ha, ha!  I'm more partial to "Steampunk Tango" myself

 Tongue

But that perhaps would be more Dieselpunk...  I did however, seriously suggest a "Mambo/Zoot-Suit" Dieselpunk given that while mambo is 1930's Cuban, it's most famous promoter (Perez Prado), moved to Mexico City in the 1940's, turning Mambo into the Mexican alternative/derivative of Big Band music toward the end of the war.   Mexico even sported a squadron of fighter planes during WW2, and so you can start drawing alternative timelines again.   Interesting to Mexican-Americans because that was the best period of interaction between the two countries, when Mexico helped with the war effort.  I even had a local teacher in Austin interested in Mexican Diesel as a way to get migrant kids in Highschool (AKA Preparatory school elsewhere) excited about history.
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« Reply #28 on: February 28, 2012, 09:20:46 am »

Dear ladies and gentlemen:

There is a call for art submissions to the "THE TIME MACHINE: An International Neo-Victorian Fair," to be held on the 19th through to the 21st of April, 2012 in Mexico City.

The production of the event was meant to raise awareness and inform the world on social changes in Mexico.  Art examples from different movements and genres such as Gothic, Lolita and Steampunk will be present, as well as members from their respective communities

For those who wish to participate:

The even will be held at the historical Maria Tereza Montoya Theatre (Eje Central LÁZARO CÁRDENAS # 912, Mexico City, c.p. 03620, Mexico http://guialocal.com.mx/teatro_maria_teresa_montoya.html)

International Art submissions will be accepted until March 23.

Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Feria-Internacional-Neo-Victoriana-La-maquina-del-Tiempo/261260757283353?ref=ts#!/pages/Feria-Internacional-Neo-Victoriana-La-maquina-del-Tiempo/261260757283353

Submissions: maquina.artisticas@mail.com
General Inquiry: maquina.direccion@mail.com
Vendor Information: maquina.comercio@mail.com

More information may be found durectly from Steampunk-Mexico forum members:
http://steampunk.mexico-foro.com/t1346-feria-internacional-neo-victoriana-la-maquina-del-tiempo

At your service,
J. Wilhelm

EDIT:  Update for today:

I leave you with this video, narrated in English, with a very very cheesy 1960's soundtrack (more appropriate I think for a Warner Brother's "Speedy Gonzales" episode), and an extremely poor sound quality.  Nevertheless the images are interesting and I'm sure more than a few of you will enjoy seeing these machines work in full technicolor

I find myself at your service,
J. Wilhelm

Originally uploaded to YouTube by "TrainElTapatio" on Oct 15, 2006:
Quote
***SYNOPSIS***
Almost every locomotive in this tape was made in the U.S.A. (some are hand-me-downs from the Nickel Plate, the Chicago Northwestern, the Florida East coast, and others). You'll see dozens including 4--4--0 Atlantics over 100 years old and sleek, modern 4--8--4 Northerns. The rare 4--8--0 Mastadon is covered in detail. There are three or four box-cab electrics and even early Alco and EMD diesels. 90 steam run pasts about evenly divided between narrow and standard gauge. 26 cab rides and dozens and dozens of old friends, sizzling quietly, waiting for the signal arm to move. There are vignettes of engineers, firemen, conductors, and brakemen - all in action. The whole is beautifully photographed, much of it against a stunning backdrop of 18,000 foot volcanoes, by the professional cinematographer Mac Owen. Closes with shots from the pilot of a diesel locomotive as it starts from sea level at Los Mochis and climbs 8,000 feet to the summit of the Sierra Madre mountains on the Chihuahua al Pacifico railroad.


"STEAM IN MEXICO" - (1963) Cuautla, Morelos. Estacion de San Lazaro.


« Last Edit: February 29, 2012, 07:47:27 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #29 on: July 26, 2012, 07:36:56 am »

Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

I necromance this old thread with the purpose of presenting some material of interest, namely the first full length documentary on Mexican Steampunk.

I confess that I have been so busy with my own Steampunk business and livelyhood in the US, that I have been grossly remiss on my duties as honorary Texas Steampunk and Brassgoggles ambassador to the Steampunk-Mexico Forum.  During the past months a great deal of changes have occurred, and the movement in that country has evolved, both in terms of speed and scope.

The movement has slowed down its former meteoric rise, but at the same time has broadened, greatly expanded across the Spanish speaking world and matured into a full-blown movement the way we know Steampunk to be in the rest of the English speaking world.  Not without pain, since the movement has suffered severe fractures and divisions along the way, and as a result various groups have emerged apart from the original Steampunk Mexico movement founded by Lord Corvinus.

While the documentary liked below is in Spanish and no doubt will leave many non-Spanish speakers without the opportunity to understand the content, the fact is that it is so well realized that I think many of us will find it easy to "fill the blank lines," so to speak, as many of us are acquainted with the Anachronistic arts and the material presented.

The images are noteworthy because they present a much clearer picture of the movement in Mexico straight from the mouth of the people who represent Steampunk in that part of the world.  This is far better than any photographs can convey.  So if a picture is worth a thousand words this short video should be worth a million.  From the images you may be able to observe the creativity, mentality and demeanor of the participants as well as minor details such as average age and other markers which give a nice account of the beginnings of Steampunk by way of subculture development in other parts of the world.

As an aside the median age is definitely younger than in English speaking countries, although some old crooners, like yours truly can be found as well, and a good number of the young people in the documentary are college or technical students as well as artists and professionals in the vocational trades....

So without further delay I present the documentary "Steampunk in Mexico" produced in June of 2012 by Mr. Axel Silva, Ms. Gaby Mosi and Ms. Bren Bernardo

CLICK ON LINK ABOVE PICTURE
http://player.vimeo.com/video/45666861


Cheers,

J. Wilhelm
« Last Edit: October 01, 2014, 08:13:59 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #30 on: July 26, 2012, 03:13:27 pm »

Muy bien!
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« Reply #31 on: July 26, 2012, 04:41:51 pm »

 Unfortunately, I'm one of those who cannot understand Spanish short of the menu board at "Taco-Bell". (and I screw that up too sometimes)
 However the enthusiasm shown by these young people is nothing short of phenomenal!

Quote
Not without pain, since the movement has suffered severe fractures and divisions along the way, and as a result various groups have emerged apart from the original Steampunk Mexico movement founded my Lord Corvinus.

 So what motivates this split up? Artistic differences, geography, politics?

 I'll bet their parties are a blast!

 Arvis
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« Reply #32 on: July 26, 2012, 10:53:03 pm »

This thread would probably overlap with your desires just enough to maybe give you an idea or two.


I thought the same exact thing. Steamwestern or Weird Wild West. My cousin who is half Mexican has considered putting together a Weird West Costume to join us in a few photo shoots.

Check out the Spaghetti Western The Mercenarie. Not exactly Steampunk but should appeal to those who appreciate Weird West and Steampunk genre.

I am half Puerto Rican myself and have yet to put together a Steampunk Airship Pirate outfit  Wink
« Last Edit: July 28, 2012, 01:38:53 am by Voltin » Logged

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« Reply #33 on: July 27, 2012, 03:18:27 am »

Thank you gentlemen for your comments!

So what motivates this split up? Artistic differences, geography, politics?

Politics and an over-bureaucratization unfortunately play a major role in this splitting process for the last two years.  Geographical considerations are also extremely important due to the size of the territory we speak of.

In the original forum, having members with an abundance of energy and youth, and many of them being college students, I observed many times how members would adopt great tasks like starting an online radio station, organizing museum exhibitions, and starting a magazine,  to quote some activities, only to become tired and overwhelmed down the line by the ambitious program they had set for themselves. The Mexican movement started many years after Steampunk became well developed in the English Speaking world; the "bar was raised very high" for these newcomers who have access to the Internet, and who want to do everything they see play out in the International Steampunk scene.

You have to remember that Mexico is a large nation geographically and demographically so you would have various events around the country, many of them originally under the banner of "Steampunk Mexico Forum."  Also within the forum you would have professional writers who already had their own Steampunk-Dieselpunk magazine for example, as well as musicians, and makers, who had their own lives organized around Steampunk before the forum existed.  Different events would have to be organized at various cities and travel arrangements would be necessary for some of the most important events like Cronopia.

In the meantime this year we saw the emergence of various international fora in Latin America and some some "cross-polination began to occur."   Steampunk Mexico began to look to Latin America a bit more like Brassgoggles looks with respect to other Steampunk fora:  not the leader by any means but definitely the most important forum.  Only the visitors from Spanish fora could avail themselves of greater resources and experience in Europe.

In the Mexican foum, older people within the group would rise through the ranks to the top and attempted to organize all those activities, giving it a structure and steering it into a particular direction with a set agenda, but less like an open social movement and more like an organization with undisclosed goals that were not discussed openly in the forum.  Often those goals would conflict with people whose professional life revolved around Steampunk and who were participating in good faith within the forum, but who felt accosted by the new forum policies.  This provided the first signs of friction last year in 2011.

At some point some of those goals, such as giving preference and a special voice to certain Latin American Steampunk interests (once that Latin American Steampunk fora started emerging), came dangerously close to usurping the egalitarian and democratic nature of the original forum.  In one particular incident earlier this winter (2011-2012) it was discovered that some favouritism toward certain Latin American members and leaders was being kept secret from all the members of various fora across Latin America, and when these goals were leaked across various international fora (about 5 or 6 countries if I remember well), that created the first "International Incident" which directly led to the ousting of some administrators and the first major rupture of the movement.

As far as Mexico that resulted in a clean split, with Steampunk Mexico on one side and the organizers of "THE TIME MACHINE: An International Neo-Victorian Fair," on the other.

As I place this post, I have found out that more recent infighting this late March has led to a split between the group representing the professional online magazine group ("El Investigador"/ Mercenarios de Dios), and the Steampunk Mexico Forum, for reasons that I don't understand too well, to be honest but that somehow are related to the organization of the video I just posted.  I didn’t even know about this until today when I wrote them to notify them about my posting, and even more bizarre, if you look at the video both representatives of the forum administration and the Magazine are present in the video (as well as people associated with Time Machine)!!!

I maintain very little contact or no contact with the organizers of TIME MACHINE, but as far as Mercenarios/El Inverstigador and Steampunk Mexico, I still regard both sides  to be friends so that places me in a difficult position.  Undecided   I can only hope that fences can be mended between the two, but then again Steampunk is greater that any one person,and there is no sign of a slowdown as more people in that country adopt the subculture, and so there is no reason I can't maintain amicable relationships with all the factions I mentioned.  

Welcome to the diplomatic world  Tongue



« Last Edit: July 27, 2012, 04:14:20 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #34 on: July 27, 2012, 03:44:01 pm »

I don't speak Spanish either but a very invigorating documentary all the same.  I've had a fascination with Mexican culture since I was quite young and always wanted to see some of the Aztec monuments and the Day of the Dead celebrations.  Now I find out there is steampunk over there as well!

Steampunk is greater that any one person,and there is no sign of a slowdown as more people in that country adopt the subculture
This is the best sign that the movement will outlive whatever politics is besieging it.  It could even be to the culture's advantage since two or more separate steampunk organisations will allow one to fail while the others continue instead of everything riding on a single group or interpretation.

I don't know how Brass Goggles decides and organises its administrators but they seem to do a pretty good job of letting people promote their events, ideas and services while keeping the politics out.
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« Reply #35 on: July 28, 2012, 08:26:58 am »

I think that there are very few truly national and transnational fora which are successful.  Precisely the fracture of the larger groups happens along the regional and areas of interest (online magazines, online radio, shops, music events, conventions), exactly as it should happen.

Trying to administer all events in a central way is not a good idea.  At some point, right after the founder of the group left and before the 2012 administration was chosen, the forum was headed by a lawyer who favoured some proposals to push the organization into a non-profit / not-for-profit organization ("civil society" as it's known in legal terms in Mexico).  I thought the idea was ridiculous at the time because the forum had existed for only 6 months, but I guess it made sense if they were going to try to raise revenue and administer various events across the country.  

In contrast in the USA events are highly localized.  The organizers of individual events operate independently from the local fora.  Those who want to form corporate entities can do so (music concerts, conventions, shops) but in the forum they participate socially only and they occasionally promote their efforts and such, so the forum is just a "public loudspeaker," but not endorsing directly those events or activities.

That is exactly what is happening now, but it's disturbing to see the lack of civility during the splitting process. That lawyer became part of the administration of "Time Machine" the annual international Steampunk expo that I wrote about...  It might make more sense to have him there in that capacity...  I don't see that as a negative, but certain members in the Steampunk Mexico Forum carry a marked animosity toward the former members in the Time Machine Expo.  At some point the animosity needs to vanish so people can choose whichever Steampunk organization they want to choose and feel free to "Cross-Polinate" again.  Please note these ruptures all happened in the span of 7 months.  So the wounds are still raw.

They are so much more passionate in Mexico compared to Texas.  Maybe I'm old and I see it in a different way, but I cant bring myself to take anything too seriously like they do.  Maybe the Texas Streampunks are all older (middle age) people, who are very busy working -all true), such that socialization is just that: socialization and nothing else.

That is why my business "Victorian Steam" is "left at the door" when I enter this forum.  My business is an entirely separate entity.  In fact most of my clientèle is not even Steampunk, but rather people who discover Steampunk and just fall in love with it ("impulse buyers").  So I never got bothered to integrate my activities much with any forum.  I come here to have fun mostly and rest.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2012, 09:23:39 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #36 on: August 31, 2012, 07:24:35 am »

Ladies and Gentlemen:

If you forgive the colourful (and loud) Mexican folkloric music, I just found this video paying homage to the women known as "Adelitas," who traveled around with the revolutionary troops (Mexican Civil War, 1910) along the rail-road system... The song itself, whose lyrics praise the Adelitas, is a Corrido, a folkloric style of song used to romanticise the revolutionary period.   I couldn't resist posting.  Rather nice images of locomotives during the revolutionary period, and you can see the Edwardian / National-Ethnic mix of styles.  It illustrates all the possibilities outside of the Victorian World proper...

La Adelita - Revolución Mexicana


EDIT:  I had mentioned this tidbit before in this thread, but somehow this information seems to belong to this post:

George Lucas' Star Wars concept for Princess Leia's hairstyle and dress is inspired by the look of the the women who would often accompany the farmer/revolutionary conscripts' into battle by riding the steam locomotives.

Native Meso-American hairstyles for women often included long braids with coloured ribbons.  The women would roll the braids in the now infamous "Cinnamon Roll" hairstyle, that George Lucas picked!  The bullets were transformed to another leather accessory in Leia's costume, if I remember well ... Princess Leia is a Mexican Revolutionary woman!
« Last Edit: August 31, 2012, 10:37:32 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #37 on: December 30, 2012, 05:35:02 am »

Dear Ladies and Gentlemen:

Please pardon the intrusion.  Just bumping this thread for the benefit of a new BG member, Mr. RJ Bowman, who was inquiring on the existence of Steampunk scenes outside of the English Speaking world...
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« Reply #38 on: January 04, 2013, 04:40:34 pm »

Thanks for bumping this, a most interesting thread which I might have missed if you had not. 
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« Reply #39 on: January 05, 2013, 03:26:42 am »

EDIT:  As an aside: I think this is known by some *at least some people* here in the USA, but George Lucas' concept for Princess Leia's hairstyle and dress is inspired by the look of the the women who would often accompany the farmer/revolutionary conscripts' into battle by riding the steam locomotives.

Princess Leia's hairstyle is identical to that worn by characters in the 1974 film Zardoz, a film that I suspect shared some designers and stylists with the 1977 film Star Wars. George Lucas was later inspired to talk out of his ass during an interview.
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« Reply #40 on: January 05, 2013, 03:29:53 am »

Quote
George Lucas was later inspired to talk out of his ass during an interview.

That is one sideshow I don’t want to see  Tongue  Grin
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« Reply #41 on: January 30, 2013, 10:53:42 am »

Speaking of revolutionaries, I'm just bumping this thread with an interesting photo-manipulation I found on the Deviantart account of a Steampunk Mexico forum member, Mr. Xpk (a.k.a. Gorgonzola666).   Apparently Pancho Villa availed himself of some interesting equipment Grin  

I presume Mr. Xpk still is in that SP Mex forum - there has been a split in that group as I detailed above).


I'm also bringing up some news and concerns.  I sadly find that the Steampunk Mexico forum (the original) has greatly slowed down from the fast pace that it enjoyed in the last couple of years.  In contrast the Japanese movement rose much more slowly and is much more limited to Tokyo (as opposed to the nation-wide Mexican movement) but has shown no signs of slowing down within the same time frame...  Comparing both movements is valid in the sense they both started at around the same time.

My understanding is that the last major event was an art gallery display that occurred in Fall of last year.  I have recently been sent photos and details of the event, and I shall post those in short term (even if posthumously) .  But I'm a tad alarmed to see basically no activity (reunions, events, etc.) since the fall.

I shall have to weigh in and try to elucidate what is going on.  I'm in fairly frequent contact with Mercenarios de Dios (the group behind the retro-futurist magazine El Investigador), and seems the magazine is concentrating  more toward the Dieselpunk side, as the leader of the group, Lord Inmusapa, had veered in that direction.  Curiously, I know Mercenarios keeps good contract with the Japanese Steampunk band Strange Artifact and other Tokyo Steampunk Society members.

I know Dieselpunk has become more important in South America, but I'm unsure if this trend translated to Mexico as well.  The activity in the Steampunk Mexico Forum is as of January showing some activity from the Spanish members of the forum, and I have no reason to believe that Steampunk in Spain has slowed down.

Alas, I don't really have a strategy, as my role in that forum is purely diplomatic, and currently my attention is placed on the Japanese Steampunk movement (I may have to have the USAS Orca cross the Pacific once again, just to find out what is going on).  What I do may be decided on what the current administration of the forum can tell me.  

I'll keep you posted

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« Reply #42 on: February 01, 2013, 03:26:53 am »

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« Reply #43 on: February 01, 2013, 09:37:07 pm »

I just had a conversation last night over Twitter with Lord Inmusapa from the Group known as Mecenarios de Dios / retrofuturist magazine El Investigador.  He's noticed the same changes I commented in my previous post, and informed me he was helping to promote Steampunk at other conventions such as ConComics, this last December in Guadalajara.  So it looks like Steampunk is following the same pattern of "infiltration" we see at other comics/animation conventions in the United States.

He also pointed out that he and his right hand, Ms. Von Marmalade, as well as the magazine have been inducted into The Steampunk Museum

http://www.thesteampunkmuseum.com/index.html


Paulo Cesar Ramirez a.k.a. Lord N. Inmusapa (you don't want to cross this guy  Grin)

Quote
Writer, analyst and promoter of Retrofuturism, Paulo Cesar Ramirez is the founder and General Coordinator of Mercenarios de DIOS, a collective which groups artists from different disciplines to work on common projects. Notable among those is "El Investigador", being the first monthly magazine about Retrofuturism in Mexico. Several issues have been translated from Spanish to English thanks to the project "El Investigador International" of which he is also General Director.

Paulo got involved in Steampunk in 2010 when he began to write his story titled 1875: Reward, some of which can be read in El Investigador.

One of his main interests has been the promotion of Steampunk, as well as analyze it, as a retrofuturistic aesthetic applied to cultural movement trough different branches, such as literature, joining Josue' Ramos in the anthologies Acronos and Planes B.

In June 2011, Paulo was part of the panel in the Steampunk presentation during the Third Festival of Literature and Comic: Cronopia, in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. Currently, he is contributing as a promoter and investigator alongside members of other steampunk communities in Latin American countries such as Argentina, Chile, Peru, and Venezuela, among others.


Araceli Rodriguez a.k.a Lady Von Marmalade

Quote
Araceli Rodriguez is the editor of the magazine 'El Investigador', both the Spanish language monthly version and the English version, known as 'El Investigador International'. She designs the monthly layout of every blog in the group of art Mercenarios de DIOS, in addition to writing regularly in the magazine, and participates occasionally in the blog The Gatehouse. Areceli was also the editorial designer of the Anthology Planes B.

She became involved in Steampunk because of her sister, Meyrilu Wendorf, who was the first person talking about Steampunk in Mexico through her blog 'La Torre de Vapor' which began in August 2009.

In January 2011 Araceli met Paulo Cesar Ramirez and asked him to create a magazine about Steampunk, which is how the first periodical steampunk publication themed in Spanish came about.

Araceli was born in Tepic, Nayarit, Mexico in 1987, was raised in Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, where she obtained a Bachelors Degree in Graphic Design as well as a diploma in Audiovisual Production. As a professional, she is the layout and editorial designer of the two most important magazines about sport fishing in Puerto Vallarta and Bahia de Banderas, Mexico. She is also creating the branding design of both Annual International Sport Fishing Tournaments in the area.

Currently, she lives in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico.



« Last Edit: February 01, 2013, 10:01:37 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #44 on: February 24, 2013, 05:51:07 am »

Online, I found this 1926 silent-film project by a National University (UNAM) student, Gabriel Garcia-Moreno.  "The Ghost Train," originally was played to audiences in various parts of Mexico and in a theatre in California (US). The film has some interesting images.  Depending on how you see it, the film could be a good source of graphical reference for Dieselpunk or Steampunk.

As usual, with Mexican period films and photos, notice the blending of European clothing of the well to do juxtaposed to the native clothing of the peasantry.  This is not just a class-cultural distinction, but an ethnic one because Mexico is a multi-ethnic country; that is, any cultural differences also follow ethnic differences and are an important basis for the historical identity of the Mexican people (as well as any identity crises that may follow from that contrast).

The film actually was in found in the 1960's split in several cellulose nitrate rolls which were stored at the National General Archive.  It was not until the early 2000's that UNAM reconstructed the film, presumably with the involvement of film students.  

"The Ghost Train" (1926) - CLICK ON LINK ABOVE PICTURE - WARNING: It's s 70 minute film...
http://www.filmoteca.unam.mx/cinelinea/silente/silente_tren_cap_1.html
« Last Edit: February 24, 2013, 05:59:58 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #45 on: March 05, 2013, 10:17:02 pm »

I am so happy I have found this thread, both Irene and I are ver interested in international Steampunk scene!

I just had a conversation last night over Twitter with Lord Inmusapa from the Group known as Mecenarios de Dios / retrofuturist magazine El Investigador [...] He also pointed out that he and his right hand, Ms. Von Marmalade, as well as the magazine have been inducted into The Steampunk Museum

http://www.thesteampunkmuseum.com/index.html

Last January we interviewed Araceli and Paulo in our brief interviews' series and they talked a lot about their main projects and the Steampunk scene in Mexico.

Hope you find it interesting Smiley
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« Reply #46 on: April 09, 2013, 08:53:03 am »

I'm just bumping this thread to include an important piece of information on the origin of rail-roads in Mexico.  Many a time I have spoken about the "delayed" industrialisation in Mexico, and even expounded that the equivalent of the Victorian Era should actually extend into the Edwardian period because of this delay.  Technically the "Steampunk-friendly" period for Mexico should end about 1910 when the "Revolution" (actually is was the Mexican Civil War) started in 1910.

A great deal of the noise surrounding this "Revolution" revolved around the influences of foreign powers, such as England and the United States, who were basically competing for the bounty of natural resources in Mexico, and most of those resources being of mineral nature.

An American citizen from Chicago, Bob Mrotek  a.k.a. "Mexico Bob," who has lived in Mexico City since 1999, and who writes a Blogspot related to Mexican culture has this to say on the origins of the rail-road system in Mexico:

From: http://mexicobob.blogspot.com/2008/08/ferrocarriles-nacionales-de-mxico.html
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Mexican Railways Bond (photo obtained from different source); controversial because the image of Pre-revolutionary President Porfirio Diaz is used in a bond from 1923.  Reviled as the leader who triggered the Civil War by favouring foreign power's interests, nevertheless he was still recognised as the architect of the National Railway system.

« Last Edit: April 09, 2013, 09:09:05 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #47 on: June 18, 2013, 05:28:23 am »

Ladies and Gentlemen:

Just bumping the thread to maintain records... It seems I have finally found the brick-and-mortar site of the splinter group which came off the Steampunk Mexico forum. They go by the name of Steampunk a la Mexicana ("Steampunk, the Mexican Way"), a smaller group with just 18 members, and here is the URL: http://steampunkalamexicana.foroactivo.mx/forum

At your service,

J. Wilhelm
« Last Edit: June 25, 2013, 10:58:07 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #48 on: June 25, 2013, 09:21:23 am »

On a very very thinly related subject, I thought Antony Caudy (despite being of the wrong nation) could be of inspiration:
http://www.google.ca/search?q=Antoni+Gaud%C3%AD&hl=fr&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=lFDJUcnSDOf64APakoCoBg&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=480&bih=208&sei=mVDJUfmgOLb64AOnv4CICw
« Last Edit: June 25, 2013, 09:26:26 am by chicar » Logged

The word pagan came from paganus , who mean peasant . Its was a way to significate than christianism was the religion of the elite and paganism the one of the savage worker class.

''Trickster shows us how we trick OURSELVES. Her rampant curiosity backfires, but, then, something NEW is discovered (though usually not what She expected)! This is where creativity comes from—experiment, do something different, maybe even something forbidden, and voila! A breakthrough occurs! Ha! Ha! We are released! The world is created anew! Do something backwards, break your own traditions, the barrier breaks; destroy the world as you know it, let the new in.''
Extract of the Dreamflesh article ''Path of The Sacred Clown''
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« Reply #49 on: June 25, 2013, 10:41:05 am »

On a very very thinly related subject, I thought Antony Caudy (despite being of the wrong nation) could be of inspiration:
http://www.google.ca/search?q=Antoni+Gaud%C3%AD&hl=fr&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=lFDJUcnSDOf64APakoCoBg&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=480&bih=208&sei=mVDJUfmgOLb64AOnv4CICw


Interesting proposition, but this Catalonian architect had a really "organic style." He was trying to recreate nature and make the art be entirely "living-organism like."  His walls flow like water sometimes and are encrusted with a variety of items like if they were shells in the beach sand or barnacles stuck to a wall.  It's hard to describe but biopunk, seems a better adjective for Gaudi.

Perhaps in his mathematical analysis of quadratic functions (hyperboloids, paraboloids) and other shapes like helicoids, he could be termed as having a more "mechanical" approach to design.  But that was only because he was somewhat obsessed and perhaps gifted with mathematics such that he saw mathematics in nature, and tried to recreate that on paper.  As organic as they were, all his designs were highly mathematical in nature (he wasn't just drawing lines); that takes a very obsessive mind.  A regular architect would focus on space, function and aesthetics.  And engineers will not draw anything more complicated than it needs to be; only the maths required to make the physics of the building work.  But Gaudi took maths to a new level as functional and aesthetic paradigms.  Very obsessive work, but it does look very organic.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2013, 11:07:28 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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