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Author Topic: The Saints of Steampunk (NOT a religious discussion)  (Read 16947 times)
Sgt.Major Thistlewaite
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I am, therefore I think.


« Reply #50 on: February 11, 2011, 03:25:07 am »


Queen Victoria: English monarch. How is it that she has not been mentioned in this thread yet? Smiley
She was, by me.  Wink
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Madame Curatrix
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« Reply #51 on: February 11, 2011, 05:23:36 am »


Queen Victoria: English monarch. How is it that she has not been mentioned in this thread yet? Smiley
She was, by me.  Wink

Blast. Well, now I feel sheepish.

However, she is well-deserving of a second mention! God save the Queen! Smiley
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Outflyer_Calliope
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« Reply #52 on: February 11, 2011, 12:00:50 pm »




However, she is well-deserving of a second mention! God save the Queen! Smiley
[/quote]

God save the Queen!
... has anyone mentioned Ms. Georgia 'Tiny' Broadwick?

Relatively unknown and a little later than Victorian, but a personal hero of mine and I think a person with real grit. She was joint responsible for helping to invent the modern parachute design still used by people today as well as holding a number of world records. IE: First person to successfully execute a 'free fall' manoeuvre before deploying a parachute and first person to jump from an airplane. That’s class....

more about Ms. Broadwick here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiny_Broadwick
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A beautiful piece of nonsense...
Sgt.Major Thistlewaite
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Gibraltar Gibraltar


I am, therefore I think.


« Reply #53 on: February 12, 2011, 01:53:20 am »


Queen Victoria: English monarch. How is it that she has not been mentioned in this thread yet? Smiley
She was, by me.  Wink

Blast. Well, now I feel sheepish.

However, she is well-deserving of a second mention! God save the Queen! Smiley

*Raises glass* To the Queen!
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Smaggers
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You cannot mesmerize me...I'm British!


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« Reply #54 on: February 12, 2011, 03:54:33 pm »




However, she is well-deserving of a second mention! God save the Queen! Smiley


God save the Queen!
... has anyone mentioned Ms. Georgia 'Tiny' Broadwick?

Relatively unknown and a little later than Victorian, but a personal hero of mine and I think a person with real grit. She was joint responsible for helping to invent the modern parachute design still used by people today as well as holding a number of world records. IE: First person to successfully execute a 'free fall' manoeuvre before deploying a parachute and first person to jump from an airplane. That’s class....

more about Ms. Broadwick here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiny_Broadwick
[/quote]

Are there no pictures of this remarkable Ms? 

From wikipedia-
Quote
In 1914, she demonstrated parachutes to the U.S. Army, which at the time had a small, hazard-prone fleet of aircraft. On one of her demonstration jumps, the static line became entangled in the tail assembly of the aircraft, so for her next jump she cut off the static line and deployed her chute manually, thus becoming the first person to jump free-fall.
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Professor Fzz
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« Reply #55 on: February 14, 2011, 12:12:50 am »

more about Ms. Broadwick here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiny_Broadwick


Are there no pictures of this remarkable Ms? 


She looks to have been quite a character:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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MWBailey
Rogue Ætherlord
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"This is the sort of thing no-one ever believes"

rtafStElmo
« Reply #56 on: February 14, 2011, 03:32:37 am »

Interesting.  I'm not familiar with early steam power in the US, but according to wikipedia, Peter Cooper built the first steam locomotive in the US, the Tom Thumb, in 1830. 

I'm surprised how late this was.  In England, Richard Trevithick built the first steam locomotive in 1804.  George Stephenson built his first colliery locomotive in 1815, and seems to have built 16 more in the next few years.  By 1825, the Stockton and Darlington railway was entirely steam hauled.  From wikipedia:

"The Stockton and Darlington Railway opened on 27 September 1825.  Driven by Stephenson, Locomotion hauled an 80-ton load of coal and flour nine miles (15 km) in two hours, reaching a speed of 24 miles per hour (39 km/h) on one stretch."


At the Rainhill Trials in 1829, Rocket managed 30mph hauling 13 tons.  And the Liverpool and Manchester Railway provided a full passenger service by 1830. 


So why was the US so slow to start building steam locomotives? 


Mainly, I think, because the technology did not, in fact exist yet on American soil. The first engine to operate on american soil, by the way, was not the Tom Thumb, but rather a British-built loco (imported from Britain) called the Stourbridge Lion. It was not until the following year that Cooper's loco was completed.

Why so late? well...
Most of america was still in a barely-post-colonial, frontierlike economy and level of technology as late as 1800;  one of the early grievances the colonists had had against British rule was the prohibition of large-scale manufactory activity; there were only a few relatively small-scale foundries and other necessary-to-locomotive-manufacture facilities immediately after the revolution, and none of them on a scale that would enable more than piecemeal production of parts -- and those only on a very small scale, if at all. Besides, much of the interior was not yet sufficiently settled or farmed to support such an enterprise, and what bulk shipping there was tended to be handled by the canal system, coastal shipping, and overland means. This made teh establishment of a railway unlikely; there simply was no need for shipping or passenger transportation on such a large scale.

Thus, British-built locos were, until the Tom Thumb was built, the only available machines and Britain the only accessible place to get them, and it was not until the 1820s that Britain had abandoned sufficiently the initiative to take the 'colonies' back for the locos, not to mention the learning of the tecdhnology to build them, to be accessible. 

Sorry for the technopolitical mention, but it's really the only coherent way to address the question.
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MWBailey
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rtafStElmo
« Reply #57 on: February 14, 2011, 03:42:03 am »


Queen Victoria: English monarch. How is it that she has not been mentioned in this thread yet? Smiley
She was, by me.  Wink

Blast. Well, now I feel sheepish.

However, she is well-deserving of a second mention! God save the Queen! Smiley

*Raises glass* To the Queen!
To the Queen! God Bless Her!
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WickedPenguin
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Exploring "What if?" stories in music and words.


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« Reply #58 on: February 14, 2011, 06:22:40 am »

Jimmy Doolittle.

While more of a dieselpunk-era figure, he exemplifies the brilliant, adventurous, can-do attitude so associated with steampunk.  This man's list of accomplishments reverberates to this day. Just to list a few...

* A test pilot in the era before wind tunnels and computational fluid dynamics. In other words, you fly 'em til you break 'em
* An air racer and stunt pilot who set many air speed records and pushed the boundaries of engine and airframe technology.
* One of the first to earn an aeronautical science doctorate.
* Invented high octane aviation fuel.
* Pioneered fuel efficiency techniques.
* Invented instrument flying - i.e. the technology pilots use to fly "blind" in clouds today.
* Pioneered strategic bombing with the 8th Air Force in WWII

And of course, this little thing called the Doolittle Raid... Smiley

If you've ever flown on an airliner, you got to your destination safely by way of equipment, techniques, and philosophies descended from Doolittle's pioneering efforts.

His autobiography I Could Never Be So Lucky Again is one of the best aviation books I've ever tead.
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Professor Fzz
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« Reply #59 on: February 14, 2011, 10:49:58 am »

So why was the US so slow to start building steam locomotives? 


Mainly, I think, because the technology did not, in fact exist yet on American soil.
...
Sorry for the technopolitical mention, but it's really the only coherent way to address the question.

Thanks for the reply - very interesting.  I always think of Victorian America as being a hotbed of technical innovation, but it's easy to forget that technical innovation tends to require a large enough support network of industry and skilled labour.  I looked up the population of the US:

1800:  5,308,483
1830:  12,866,020
1850:  23,191,876
1900:  76,212,168

In the early years of the 19th century, there simply weren't enough people to support both industry and rapid expansion of agriculture.  But that certainly changed quickly.
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Miles (a sailor)Martin
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Just a head full of random thoughts


« Reply #60 on: March 07, 2011, 02:43:52 am »

Do you all know why Mark Twain  used a fellow from Conneticut as his hero  in a Conn. Yankee in King Arthur's Court?  It was because from 1835-1870 Conneticut was the equvalent of the Silicon Valley,almost every were you went had some factory or foundry creating the latest and most uptodate stuff that was avalable.  just the cutting edge of American industry not nessisaraly the backbone but definitly where the brains were trained.   Miles
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Professor Griffiths
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For God and Country!


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« Reply #61 on: March 07, 2011, 04:10:51 am »

I would have to definitely list a few people to the Saints list.

Leonardo Da Vinci
Nikola Tesla

I will NOT list Edison for he was an Ass Hat towards Tesla, and stole millions.

The Wright Brothers
Amelia Earhart
Mark Twain
Benjamin Franklin
Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin
Charles Lindburgh

I do like having Dante Cortes, The Count of Monte Cristo listed.

To Queen Victoria and King Edward.

God Save the Queen
Long Live the King
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Uriah Klinkhammer
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United States United States



« Reply #62 on: March 07, 2011, 06:40:12 am »

I must say someone I have drawn inspiration from even before my introduction to steampunk is Benjamin Franklin.  I once had to portray him during his days of working under his brother James, and so I read up on him to get a better idea of who he was beyond his life as a revolutionary.  I try to learn from him in the hopes of being able to collect my scattered thoughts and put them to use.  And now with this I have another reason to turn to him.

Of others already mentioned, Da Vinci, Tesla, Twain, Babbage, Miss Lovelace and, of course, Queen Victoria are definitely worthy of Sainthood.

Also, when I think of steam, I think of John Henry, the world's strongest man who fought the steam powered hammer and won.  The truth behind it isn't certain (and seems a little improbable), but I saw someone mentioning fictional characters, so I figure either way he should get a mention.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Henry_(folklore)
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Dr. Madd
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Maker of Monsters


« Reply #63 on: March 07, 2011, 07:58:01 am »

Mary Shelley.
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What do we want? Decapitations!
Dr. Sniderbunk
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« Reply #64 on: March 09, 2011, 09:43:39 pm »

1801 Joseph Marie Jacquard invented a power loom without such we wouldn't have the Paisley
1890 Herman Hollerith invented the tabulator
1842-1843 Alexander Bain - Fax Machine
Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen
1850 Joseph Lister
Florence Nightengale

Honerable mention
1902 Dutch physiologist, Willem Einthoven First EKG
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Dr. Madd
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Maker of Monsters


« Reply #65 on: March 10, 2011, 12:50:15 pm »

Pinkertons were scum.


As a Southerner, I'd have to agree.



His battle tactics were studied by men like Irwin Rommel and George Patton. He defeated an ironclad gunboat with cavalry!



While not a nice man personally, he was responsible for a lot of 19th century tech.



Invented the Cotton Gin



John Ericsson, brought Ironclads into the mainstream.
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Doctor J. Morrow
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United States United States



« Reply #66 on: March 16, 2011, 03:24:06 am »

Doc Savage, the Shadow, Mark Twain, and Tesla.
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Dr. Madd
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Maker of Monsters


« Reply #67 on: March 16, 2011, 06:28:54 am »

Baron Manfred Von Richtofen
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Zastrozzi
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« Reply #68 on: March 25, 2011, 11:58:10 pm »

Lewis Carroll.

Mary Shelley.

More up to date, Tim Powers.
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Mercury Wells
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I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #69 on: March 19, 2012, 03:30:43 am »

Babbage.
Lumiere Brothers.
Wilkie Collins. (first detective novelist)
AC-D. (Sherlock Holmes)
And not forgeting Rik Mayal for bringing alive the alter ego of Harry Flashman...HUZZAH!
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Captain Shipton Bellinger
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« Reply #70 on: March 19, 2012, 07:49:37 am »

Emily Warren Roebling - a fascinating and extraordinary lady.

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KABAR2
Zeppelin Captain
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United States United States



« Reply #71 on: March 20, 2012, 01:07:15 am »

George Labram an engineer for Debeer's During the Boer seige of Kimberly
he was instermental in building the defenses including a 155ft watch tower search lights and a telephone system....... he supplied munitions for British artillery,
built two armored trains and the largest cannon the British had at the seige.....
known as the Long Cecile it was rifled with a bore of 4.1 inches (100 mm) capable of propelling a 28.5 pounds (12.9 kg) shell over 6,500 yards (5,900 m)

Labram installed an emergency fresh-water supply system for the town and designed a bulk refrigeration plant for perishable foodstuffs, specifically for the storage of meat from cattle that had to be slaughtered as they could no longer be let out for grazing.

Labram was killed on 9 February 1900, less than a week before the siege was lifted, by a Boer shell that hit his room in the Grand Hotel on Market Square.Kekewich gave Labram a full military funeral, that was attended by thousands despite Boer shelling specifically targeting the procession.


George Labram in font of wheel of the Long Ceceil
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Lt. Thomas Corvidae
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« Reply #72 on: March 20, 2012, 04:06:47 am »

So why was the US so slow to start building steam locomotives? 


Mainly, I think, because the technology did not, in fact exist yet on American soil.
...
Sorry for the technopolitical mention, but it's really the only coherent way to address the question.

Thanks for the reply - very interesting.  I always think of Victorian America as being a hotbed of technical innovation, but it's easy to forget that technical innovation tends to require a large enough support network of industry and skilled labour.  I looked up the population of the US:

1800:  5,308,483
1830:  12,866,020
1850:  23,191,876
1900:  76,212,168

In the early years of the 19th century, there simply weren't enough people to support both industry and rapid expansion of agriculture.  But that certainly changed quickly.


We're like rabbits. Somewhat prudish (in public places) rabbits.

I am surprised that no one has mentioned Mr. Edgar Allen Poe. A little bit before hand, but lets face it, most Saints are Medieval figures so we can have a few that come in before the Victorian Age.
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“Can a magician kill a man by magic?” Lord Wellington asked Strange. Strange frowned. He seemed to dislike the question. “I suppose a magician might,” he admitted, “but a gentleman never could.”
MakerMike
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MakerMike
« Reply #73 on: March 21, 2012, 09:50:59 pm »

Interesting thread.  I'll add a few that I've been collecting.

Michael Faraday--chemist, physicist, discovered many of the theoretical underpinnings of electrical technology exploited by Edison and Tesla.  Largely self-taught.

Thaddeus Lowe--American ballooning pioneer, Count von Zeppelin learned from him.
Francis Galton--English polymath, an amazing breadth of work, including writing "The Art of Travel, or Shifts and Conveyences available in Wild Countries", a real interesting browse.
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yaghish
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Netherlands Netherlands

Aethernaut

schlimazlnik
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« Reply #74 on: March 21, 2012, 10:48:31 pm »

These are my saints:
  • Bruce Sterling - mainly because of his involvement in the Dead Media project, which I love and have gotten inspiration from throughout the years
  • William Gibson. He's still punkin' literature with new ideas instead of punkin' old ones from others.
  • "Sarah Legend" - who had the only steampunk website on the internet for years, even when it only covered Western Steampunk.
  • Cory Gross - another individual who made steampunk available in the early internet years
  • Krzysztof Janicz - editor of the Steampunkopedia, one of the first projects to explore the unknown borders of steampunk. The collection of works never wears out when it comes to inspiration.
  • My Granddad, who has build his own steam engine and magic lantern, among other things, out of garbage.
  • My Grandma, who let me watch Bearcats! on the telly, a long, long time ago.
  • Griet Zelle - Being a dancer and a spy in Victorian/colonian times, she deserves mentioning and this gives me the opportunity to place a stunning picture in this post.


Mata Hari 6 [Public domain], by Lucien Walery (http://www.bikiniscience.com/), from Wikimedia Commons

« Last Edit: March 21, 2012, 10:50:06 pm by yaghish » Logged

When there's a will, there's a dirigible to take you there
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