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Author Topic: The Saints of Steampunk (NOT a religious discussion)  (Read 16746 times)
Sgt.Major Thistlewaite
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« Reply #25 on: September 02, 2010, 09:55:58 pm »

I second Agememnon...Pinkerton was scum. His agents were scum. That Lincoln trusted him is no vote of confidence in my book...Lincoln was scum. Guess it depends on which side of the Mason-Dixon you grew up. Lincoln should be remembered as the greatest War Criminal that America ever produced, instead of the "Great Emancipator." What a load of baloney. Oh well, the winners get to write the history books.
Brunel.
Tesla.
Robert E. Lee
David Crockett of Tennessee.
Queen Victoria.
Shackleton.
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« Reply #26 on: September 02, 2010, 10:17:48 pm »

Someone said Sharpe earlier, I agree wholeheartedly.

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« Reply #27 on: September 02, 2010, 11:30:45 pm »

I second Agememnon...Pinkerton was scum. His agents were scum. That Lincoln trusted him is no vote of confidence in my book...Lincoln was scum. Guess it depends on which side of the Mason-Dixon you grew up. Lincoln should be remembered as the greatest War Criminal that America ever produced, instead of the "Great Emancipator." What a load of baloney. Oh well, the winners get to write the history books.
Brunel.
Tesla.
Robert E. Lee
David Crockett of Tennessee.
Queen Victoria.
Shackleton.

*bites his tongue*

*fails*

you clearly forgot your white sheet today
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Captain Brandsson
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« Reply #28 on: September 03, 2010, 12:41:41 am »

Stop.  Now.  Both of you (and anyone else thinking about it).

There are rules regarding this sort of thing at Brass Goggles.

Agreement or disagreement with either side is a non-issue.
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- Maximilian
Sgt.Major Thistlewaite
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« Reply #29 on: September 03, 2010, 12:46:57 am »

Sorry, Max...hadn't been around in a while, it takes practice. I suppose politics is still politics even if it is 145 years old. My fault, and I apologize.

p.s. Pinkerton was still scum. Scum is scum.
« Last Edit: September 03, 2010, 12:49:30 am by Sgt.Major Thistlewaite » Logged
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« Reply #30 on: September 03, 2010, 12:55:02 am »

No apology required. 

I just wanna keep the thread positive and respect the rules of the virtual house we all enjoy.
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Reverend Panic
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« Reply #31 on: September 03, 2010, 02:14:45 am »



Myth says this man proposed to Queen Victoria, upon hearing of this, the prime minister of France was quoted as saying that the union would have been disastarous on a global scale.

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« Reply #32 on: September 03, 2010, 02:17:23 pm »

Martha Jane Cannary Burke, better known as Calamity Jane
William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody
James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok
Phoebe Ann Mosey better known as Annie Oakley


one hell of a party that would be....
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Maj. Clive Hathaway
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« Reply #33 on: September 03, 2010, 06:58:07 pm »

While we're out west I'll second Wild Bill...


 And raise you Doc Holiday


And the Sundance Kid



And for the record, being a Southron sympathizer does not make one a defacto member of the KKK. In fact, had the south been dealt with in a fair & just manner as befits an honorable foe, fringe groups like the KKK would never have gained traction.

And despite popular opinion (it would seem), Alan Pinkerton was a distinguished man who did a lot of good, even if he was a bit of a mercenary. Before coming to the US, he was involved in a lot of workers rights issues in Scotland & England. I admire him in the same way i admire Erwin Rommel.

Just my 2-cents here...

« Last Edit: September 03, 2010, 08:53:26 pm by Maj. Clive Hathaway » Logged

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« Reply #34 on: September 04, 2010, 03:13:23 am »

Alphonso Mucha
William Morris
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« Reply #35 on: September 04, 2010, 03:23:11 am »

Perhaps another non-period entry, but I'm sure no aeronauts will disagree: Hugo Eckener. The Hindenburg fiasco was unfortunate, but the modern concept of the rigid-body airship owes it's existence to Eckener.
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« Reply #36 on: September 04, 2010, 08:34:06 am »

Oh ye of little faith! I am so surprised you have never heard of Our Lady of Conductivity
http://silvergrey.deviantart.com/art/Our-Lady-of-Conductivity-78372418

On a more serious note, I'm an engineer, and I propose Sadi Carnot as a "Steampunk Saint"

From Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicolas_L%C3%A9onard_Sadi_Carnot



Below is one of his faithful modern-day priests, my former thermodynamics professor;  The honorable Philip Schmidt of The University of Texas at Austin, dressed as "Sadi Carnot"  He still is teaching and probably pulling the same fake accent for the whole lecture around the Thanksgiving (Or was it Halloween?) date...  We need to invite this guy to a steampunk outing

From http://www.me.utexas.edu/news/2009/0509_schmidt_chancellors_award.php


Quote
Thermodynamics students find themselves back in 1824 when Sadi Carnot (aka Phil Schmidt) makes a guest appearance to explain his discovery of the second law of thermodynamics. Carnot has been delivering the famous lecture for over 20 years.

« Last Edit: September 08, 2010, 06:24:47 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Professor Fzz
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« Reply #37 on: September 04, 2010, 09:38:22 am »

I don't know how we missed him, but Richard Trevithick has to make the list. 

How could we possibly forget the inventor of the steam locomotive and the steam carriage:






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Professor Ross
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« Reply #38 on: September 04, 2010, 06:57:47 pm »

Perhaps another non-period entry, but I'm sure no aeronauts will disagree: Hugo Eckener. The Hindenburg fiasco was unfortunate, but the modern concept of the rigid-body airship owes it's existence to Eckener.

I certainly agree!

I would also like to add Count von Zeppelin himself.
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dixi
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« Reply #39 on: September 07, 2010, 08:15:30 pm »

Bleh, my internest has been out for several days.  Even though the Good Capitain said appologies where not needed, I should not have gone to that area in the first place. 

And I am absolutely not accusing Southern Sympathizers of being racists in any sort of all inclusive way.  That would make me a total hypocrit.
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von Corax
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« Reply #40 on: September 08, 2010, 05:04:04 am »

Fred Dibnah
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Dibnah

I met him in 1984 as well Smiley


A Sainthood for Fred Dibnah? The Blessed Dibnah would be aghast at the thought, and would likely want to ’it you wi’ spanner for suggesting it. Tongue
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Miles (a sailor)Martin
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« Reply #41 on: February 08, 2011, 11:57:56 pm »

as a machinist i must bring this gentleman to your attention
quoted  from lindsays tech pubs site
from Eminent Engineers by Dwight Goddard - 1906

Henry Maudsley was the originator of modern machine tools. He came of an old English family who had their seat near Ormskirk, but who became scattered during the eighteenth century. William Maudsley, father of Henry, was a joiner working in the neighborhood of Bolton. He got into some trouble and joined the Royal Artillery, to be sent, soon afterward, to the West Indies, where he was badly wounded. He was sent home, and afterwards discharged, but being a handy workman was soon employed in the arsenal. Here he was married and Henry was born in August, 1770. When twelve years of age he was sent to work filling cartridges, and two years later he was set at work in the carpenters shop. His heart, however, was in the nearby blacksmith shop, and after several reprimands for neglecting his work he was transferred to the smithy when fifteen years of age.

His heart was in this work and he rapidly became an expert craftsman, especially in forging light iron work, and, in the use of the file, he soon surpassed all others.

At this time Joseph Bramah had taken out patents for improved locks of the now well-known tumbler type. These were a great improvement over previous locks. Bramah challenged any one to pick a lock of his manufacture, and the challenge was unaccepted until fifty years later, when Hobbs, an American expert, after sixteen days of effort, finally succeeded.

This lock was so delicate a mechanism that he found difficulty in securing workmen skillful enough to make them. Maudsley was recommended to him, but when Bramah saw how young he was, at that time only eighteen, he hesitated to employ him. His need was so great, however, that he finally hired him. When Maudsley presented himself for service a new difficulty arose. He had not served the requisite seven years of apprenticeship and the other workmen refused to receive him.

Maudsley himself solved the difficulty by proposing the repair of a worn-out and broken bench vice before six o'clock, and if his workmanship did not commend him he would withdraw. His success was complete. The most exacting of the workmen acknowledged his skill. The tact and good sense thus early shown were characteristic of him in all his relations with his workmen.

Maudsley soon proved himself to be the most skillful of them all. It is interesting to note that the very padlock that fifty years later withstood the American expert for sixteen days, was one made by Maudsley's own hands when in the employ of Bramah.

He had the surest eye and the best judgment in undertaking any new work, and it was more and more referred to him.

Notwithstanding his youth, he was advanced from place to place until, by unanimous consent, he was made the head foreman.

Maudsley saw at once that it was essential, if the locks were to be manufactured in any quantity, that the parts must be made by machines that would be independent of men's carelessness. Skilled hand work could make a few, but the number were limited, the expense great and the merit very unequal. He became especially useful in designing special tools for making the patent locks. Smiles says: "In this department Maudsley was eminently successful, and to his laborious ingenuity, as first displayed in Bramah's workshops, and afterwards in his own establishment, we unquestionably owe much of the power and acccuracy of our present self-acting machinery."

Another of his inventions, that alone should bring him fame, was the leather self-tightening collar for packing hydraulic presses. It was Bramah again who patented the press, but its usefulness was nullified by the packing necessary to withstand the enormous pressure, It was Maudsley who designed the leather cup that clings the closer with added pressure but without noticeably increasing friction.

Maudsley stayed with Bramah eight years with but slight increase of wages, and when he, at last, asked for an increase was refused so brusquely that he resigned, and in 1797 opened a small shop of his own near Oxford Street. Little by little work came to him, and every task was so nicely done that it invariably brought him new work. Maudsley continued to apply himself to the invention and improvement of tools that would insure precision of work and make him, in a measure, independent of the carelessness of workmen. It was in this endeavor that he brought to perfection that great improvement with which his name is usually connected, the invention of the slide rest. The first he ever made was while he was still at Bramah's shop, but with his additional improvements he brought the lathe, for the first time, to be a machine of precision, and laid the foundation for the success of all our modern machine tools. Before this, nicety of construction depended altogether on correctness of eye and manual dexterity, with consequent high cost and unequal merit. Thereafter followed that correctness, uniformity and economy that increasingly marked the machine construction of the nineteenth century.

One of the early tasks that came to Maudsley was brought by Brunel. He had been granted a patent for tackle blocks which had been adopted by the admiralty. Maudsley's high reputation came to Brunel's attention, and he was engaged to perfect the machinery for their manufacture.

Maudsley, who was a fine draftsman, made the drawings and the working models in 1801. Before beginning construction he removed his shop to Margaret Street. The whole of the machinery was there constructed by Maudsley. It took six long years, and was not ready for operation until 1808. It required no less than forty four different machines to do the work, every one of which embodied some more or less radical invention and improvement by Maudsley. These machines were in regular employment at the Portsmouth dockyard for upwards of fifty years.

The success of this block-making machinery brought Maudsley added fame and prosperity.

He moved again, this time to Lambeth, and took in a partner in 1810, the company thereafter being known as Maudsley & Field. They made many and various kinds of machinery, flour mills, saw mills, mint machinery, machine tools and engines of all kinds, especially marine engines. A patent granted in 1807 for improvement in steam engines, specified, among other things, the now common pyramidal type of marine engine, with direct connections from piston to crank. He invented a machine for punching boiler plates, and continued to improve the lathe as long as he lived. He made some large machines, but he took the greatest interest in machines of delicacy and precision.

His love for accuracy early led him to give thought to improvement in screw cutting. He made a machine for cutting original screws and from that made the first screw-cutting lathe. He also took the first steps for securing uniformity and standard pitch.

Like all good workmen he took great pride in keeping his tools in good order and condition. Every machine to which he gave thought came from his hand simplified, improved, and with the impress of his personality upon it.

But that for which Maudsley is most worthy of remembrance is not the machinery he built, but the men he trained. His exceedingly attractive nature, his tall, fine presence, his genial ways, bound men to him; not only his friends, but his workmen loved him as a man, while honoring him as a master workman. It was quite natural that there should gather around him a group of assistants who were young men of ability and worth. In fact his shop came to have a reputation all over England as the place for securing the best mechanical training. It was with him that such men as James Nasmyth, Sir Joseph Whitworth, Joseph Clement, and a host of others received their training. This training was not in mechanics alone, but in the wise comments and advice that fell from his lips and, like seed falling in good ground, sprang up, in the years that followed, in the able life of his "boys."

He had his friends also among the foremost scholars and scientists of the day, who made his private workshop a favorite rendezvous. From his shop radiated an influence that is plainly seen in the wonderful development of mechanical engineering in England from his time on. Under his training such men as Nasmyth, Clement and Whitworth, and others received their training, and from them his influence passed on to Sellers and Colt, to E.K. Root, and Francis A. Pratt, to shape also our American practice.

In personal appearance his was of commanding stature, six feet two inches tall, and massively built. He had a high forehead, eyes bright and keen, lips expressive of good humor, but strong and alert. He was cheerful, honest, intellectual and energetic.

He went to France to see a friend who was very sick and, on returning, caught a severe cold, from which he died in 1831.

              Miles
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #42 on: February 09, 2011, 03:19:43 am »

What about this fine chap?

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/historyofus/web04/features/bio/B06_2.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Cooper

I haven't seen his biography yet, but the Public Broadcasting Station here in America has been making quite a bit of fanfare about him...

Starting as an apprentice, this self schooled man became an inventor, powerful industrialist and even ran for the presidency.  He made his first money as a child by inventing a type of glue  Grin He was the first to successfully use anthracite coal to puddle iron in steel mills, and he founded the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art.  Seems pretty Steampunky to me!
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« Reply #43 on: February 10, 2011, 01:53:30 am »

Interesting.  I'm not familiar with early steam power in the US, but according to wikipedia, Peter Cooper built the first steam locomotive in the US, the Tom Thumb, in 1830. 

I'm surprised how late this was.  In England, Richard Trevithick built the first steam locomotive in 1804.  George Stephenson built his first colliery locomotive in 1815, and seems to have built 16 more in the next few years.  By 1825, the Stockton and Darlington railway was entirely steam hauled.  From wikipedia:

"The Stockton and Darlington Railway opened on 27 September 1825.  Driven by Stephenson, Locomotion hauled an 80-ton load of coal and flour nine miles (15 km) in two hours, reaching a speed of 24 miles per hour (39 km/h) on one stretch."

At the Rainhill Trials in 1829, Rocket managed 30mph hauling 13 tons.  And the Liverpool and Manchester Railway provided a full passenger service by 1830. 


So why was the US so slow to start building steam locomotives? 

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Zuzu
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« Reply #44 on: February 10, 2011, 02:11:31 am »

This forum as a whole.. Wink

I don't look at any individuals for inspiration. There are too many great names, and trying to emulate them would only lead to catastrophic failure, which would be quite depressing. Instead, I look at all the wondrous stuff that gets posted here and make little mental notes of the stuff I find particularly interesting. Usually little details that i could incorporate in projects of my own, etc.

Im in concord...

this forum and the people in it have helped me grasp the steampunk world. some of the things ive seen in here  have really inspired..
FOr example , i have not stopped talking about the steampunk USBs the gentleman in here made..
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #45 on: February 10, 2011, 03:50:29 am »

Interesting.  I'm not familiar with early steam power in the US, but according to wikipedia, Peter Cooper built the first steam locomotive in the US, the Tom Thumb, in 1830.  

I'm surprised how late this was.  In England, Richard Trevithick built the first steam locomotive in 1804.  George Stephenson built his first colliery locomotive in 1815, and seems to have built 16 more in the next few years.  By 1825, the Stockton and Darlington railway was entirely steam hauled.  From wikipedia:

"The Stockton and Darlington Railway opened on 27 September 1825.  Driven by Stephenson, Locomotion hauled an 80-ton load of coal and flour nine miles (15 km) in two hours, reaching a speed of 24 miles per hour (39 km/h) on one stretch."

At the Rainhill Trials in 1829, Rocket managed 30mph hauling 13 tons.  And the Liverpool and Manchester Railway provided a full passenger service by 1830.  


So why was the US so slow to start building steam locomotives?  



Interesting.  But it's worthy to note that it may have something to do with the prospects for territorial expansion in the US.  Let's not forget the difficulty in establishing safe routes for communication across the expanding territory and the particular topography that one is required to cross depending on the stage of development of the nation (e.g. the Appalachian Mountain range, the Rocky Mountain range, later after the Annexation of Texas in 1845 and and the Mexican American War of 1846-8, the deserts in the Southwest, etc. etc.)  I'll re-read a history book to see if I can find if Cooper had a particular motivation and what the railroad market looked like in those years...


... some of the things ive seen in here  have really inspired... for example , i have not stopped talking about the steampunk USBs the gentleman in here made..

Of whom might we be talking about, my lady?  We have more than a few Memory Disk fabricators in here  Cheesy
« Last Edit: February 10, 2011, 04:02:39 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Madame Curatrix
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« Reply #46 on: February 10, 2011, 06:20:28 pm »

People I look to for 'steampunk' inspirations are less inventors, and more artists, architects, and designers - individuals who, in my opinion, represent the pinnacle of aesthetic evolution and innovation in the Victorian/turn-of-the-century period. They embody the exotic, fantastic, majestic and extravagant that I believe to be integral to the steampunk movement. Of course, this list is by no means exhaustive, just some of the individuals that first come to mind for me. Smiley

Sir George Gilbert Scott: English architect of the Victorian era, with many of his works exhibiting the flamboyant Neo-Gothic style, such as in the Prince Albert Memorial.

Gustave Eiffel: French architect and engineering genius, responsible for that glorious ironwork tower in Paris, as well as the armature supporting Lady Liberty, and a plethora of magnificent public buildings on multiple continents.

Charles Garnier: French architect of the famous Paris Opera House, a marvel of engineering and beauty.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: English author who hardly needs an introduction. I've always been most inspired by his Sherlock Holmes stories.

Louis Comfort Tiffany: American master of art glass and stained glass, and interior decorator. His stained glass lamps, with their rich bronze bases and intricate, jewel-liked shades, continue to be imitated and and replicated.

Rene Lalique: French jeweler and art glass artisan. His designs combined natural motifs and mythological imagery to create striking works that were a great departure from mainstream Victorian jewelry styles.

Charles Frederick Worth: French fashion designer, considered the father of haute couture, whose lavish gowns were sought by the world's richest and most fashionable women, including royalty. Original examples are highly prized by collectors today.

Sarah Bernhardt: Iconic French-Jewish actress and artist. Known for her beauty, stage acting (she also starred in some of the earliest silent films) and controversial and exotic lifestyle. For example, she owned a pet tortoise with a jewel-encrusted shell, often played male roles, and she slept in a coffin. She was an inspiration to many artists of the period, most notably Art Nouveau genius Alphonse Mucha.

Queen Victoria: English monarch. How is it that she has not been mentioned in this thread yet? Smiley
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Smaggers
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« Reply #47 on: February 10, 2011, 08:34:24 pm »

IKB


Very unPC in places, but it has a song about a big top hat.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2011, 08:38:39 pm by Smaggers » Logged

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Matthias Gladstone
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« Reply #48 on: February 11, 2011, 12:46:15 am »

"Thirded" on Hugo Eckener; a fine individual and a personal hero.
On the airship front, we certainly can't omit the Graf Ferdinand Von Zeppelin, or the pioneering aviator and the first man to make a powered flight, Henri Giffard. Similarly, I feel Barnes Wallis, while well out of period, deserves a mention for the R-100.
I'll second Richard Trevithick, he was rather pioneering in his use of high pressure steam.
I'd also like to add Edward Teach "Blackbeard", Bartholomew Roberts and all of the other "classic" pirates from the Golden Age. An indirect link, but without popular pirate fiction, we wouldn't have airship pirates, which are something of a staple.
-Matt
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« Reply #49 on: February 11, 2011, 03:00:26 am »

The man who caused my initial love of weird science and crackpot inventions was this chap. (the videos aren't working for me sadly, but you'll get the idea pretty quick)

http://www.wilflunn.com/

For those unfamiliar Wilfred Lunn is probably best known for his regular appearences in the groundbreaking British childrens T.V show Vision On back in the 70's. I don't think the concept of Steampunk had quite come to fruition then, but as they say some people just have it in their blood, and I personally think he's one.

Edit

Once again in hindsight, I run the chaps name through the BG search engine. Jolly glad to see his contributions have been acknowleged many times before  Grin

I'd also have to give at least some props to Prince Albert as well  Wink
« Last Edit: February 11, 2011, 03:14:58 am by Argus Fairbrass » Logged

Have her steamed and brought to my tent!
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